WEFOUNDSteve Jobs Great Personalities Of World


I t has been five years since Apple co-founder Steve Jobs passed away after a long-fought battle with pancreatic cancer, just six weeks after he stepped down as chief executive of the iPhone maker.

Today, Jobs is still remembered as an inspirational speaker and revolutionary innovator. Here are some of the best things he said over his four decades as one of the most important figures in the technology industry: 

Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven't found it yet, keep looking. Don't settle.

Throughout his life, the late Steve Jobs was known as being one of the most influential and innovative leaders of his time. Jobs is not only the founder of Apple and Pixar but he was able to lead several organizations into being some of the most powerful in the country. He was known for being demanding and hard working, yet possessing a certain Zen and simplicity. While many of us will never be able to mimic the unique characteristics that made Steve Jobs such an inspirational leader, there are a number of lessons that any individual can learn from his unique leadership style.

While most individuals know that it is important to have a certain amount of confidence in a leadership position, Steve Jobs showcased just how important this was with his own efforts with his products. If there was one thing that Steve Jobs had it was confidence and it is something that gave his team members the self-assurance they needed to break barriers and create some of the most innovative pieces of technology in our world today.

One of the most famous stories involving Jobs’ confidence is when he wanted a special type of glass for the front of the iPhone and he wanted it quick. When an employee told him it was impossible, Jobs simply said “Yes you can do it. You can deliver, don’t be afraid.” This type of confidence not only in himself and in his products, but also in others is what made Jobs the leader so many know him as today.

I t has been five years since Apple co-founder Steve Jobs passed away after a long-fought battle with pancreatic cancer, just six weeks after he stepped down as chief executive of the iPhone maker.

Today, Jobs is still remembered as an inspirational speaker and revolutionary innovator. Here are some of the best things he said over his four decades as one of the most important figures in the technology industry: 

Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven't found it yet, keep looking. Don't settle.

Throughout his life, the late Steve Jobs was known as being one of the most influential and innovative leaders of his time. Jobs is not only the founder of Apple and Pixar but he was able to lead several organizations into being some of the most powerful in the country. He was known for being demanding and hard working, yet possessing a certain Zen and simplicity. While many of us will never be able to mimic the unique characteristics that made Steve Jobs such an inspirational leader, there are a number of lessons that any individual can learn from his unique leadership style.

While most individuals know that it is important to have a certain amount of confidence in a leadership position, Steve Jobs showcased just how important this was with his own efforts with his products. If there was one thing that Steve Jobs had it was confidence and it is something that gave his team members the self-assurance they needed to break barriers and create some of the most innovative pieces of technology in our world today.

One of the most famous stories involving Jobs’ confidence is when he wanted a special type of glass for the front of the iPhone and he wanted it quick. When an employee told him it was impossible, Jobs simply said “Yes you can do it. You can deliver, don’t be afraid.” This type of confidence not only in himself and in his products, but also in others is what made Jobs the leader so many know him as today.

We hear a lot about toxic leaders these days, and especially how bad they are for military units, so I was surprised when I picked up Water Isasacson’s terrific biography of Steve Jobs of Apple/Pixar fame to see that Jobs was a classic toxic leader — bullying, self-indulgent, lacking empathy, often ungrateful, unwilling to give credit where it was due, and a world-class control freak. (I hadn’t planned to read the book, but my wife, who cares about computers maybe even less than I do but cares a lot about history, recommended it highly as a story of our times.)

Job’s awful behavior was not just a matter of corporate antics. He was downright weird, not believing in showering much and wafting such bad body odor early that in his career he was told to work nights. An abandoned child himself, he neglected for many years a child he fathered and wasn’t particularly good with his subsequent offspring. One former girlfriend called him an enlightened person, but unusually, also a cruel one.   

Here’s the problem : There is no question that Steve Jobs was a self-centered jerk. Yet he also appears to have been a great corporate leader and innovator who pulled off a series of successes — the Apple II and MacIntosh computers, the Pixar movie animation studio, the iPod, the iPad, and the iPhone. These have had an impact on the way we live. In the process, Jobs built one of the world’s most valuable companies. 

I t has been five years since Apple co-founder Steve Jobs passed away after a long-fought battle with pancreatic cancer, just six weeks after he stepped down as chief executive of the iPhone maker.

Today, Jobs is still remembered as an inspirational speaker and revolutionary innovator. Here are some of the best things he said over his four decades as one of the most important figures in the technology industry: 

Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven't found it yet, keep looking. Don't settle.

Throughout his life, the late Steve Jobs was known as being one of the most influential and innovative leaders of his time. Jobs is not only the founder of Apple and Pixar but he was able to lead several organizations into being some of the most powerful in the country. He was known for being demanding and hard working, yet possessing a certain Zen and simplicity. While many of us will never be able to mimic the unique characteristics that made Steve Jobs such an inspirational leader, there are a number of lessons that any individual can learn from his unique leadership style.

While most individuals know that it is important to have a certain amount of confidence in a leadership position, Steve Jobs showcased just how important this was with his own efforts with his products. If there was one thing that Steve Jobs had it was confidence and it is something that gave his team members the self-assurance they needed to break barriers and create some of the most innovative pieces of technology in our world today.

One of the most famous stories involving Jobs’ confidence is when he wanted a special type of glass for the front of the iPhone and he wanted it quick. When an employee told him it was impossible, Jobs simply said “Yes you can do it. You can deliver, don’t be afraid.” This type of confidence not only in himself and in his products, but also in others is what made Jobs the leader so many know him as today.

We hear a lot about toxic leaders these days, and especially how bad they are for military units, so I was surprised when I picked up Water Isasacson’s terrific biography of Steve Jobs of Apple/Pixar fame to see that Jobs was a classic toxic leader — bullying, self-indulgent, lacking empathy, often ungrateful, unwilling to give credit where it was due, and a world-class control freak. (I hadn’t planned to read the book, but my wife, who cares about computers maybe even less than I do but cares a lot about history, recommended it highly as a story of our times.)

Job’s awful behavior was not just a matter of corporate antics. He was downright weird, not believing in showering much and wafting such bad body odor early that in his career he was told to work nights. An abandoned child himself, he neglected for many years a child he fathered and wasn’t particularly good with his subsequent offspring. One former girlfriend called him an enlightened person, but unusually, also a cruel one.   

Here’s the problem : There is no question that Steve Jobs was a self-centered jerk. Yet he also appears to have been a great corporate leader and innovator who pulled off a series of successes — the Apple II and MacIntosh computers, the Pixar movie animation studio, the iPod, the iPad, and the iPhone. These have had an impact on the way we live. In the process, Jobs built one of the world’s most valuable companies. 

He's remembered for his obsessive commitment to quality (sometimes to the point of ruthlessness ), incredible success, and vision.  

The former Gilt Groupe CEO has let the same guiding principle take her from developing 'The Bachelor' to running Martha Stewart's empire to challenging Silicon Valley

I t has been five years since Apple co-founder Steve Jobs passed away after a long-fought battle with pancreatic cancer, just six weeks after he stepped down as chief executive of the iPhone maker.

Today, Jobs is still remembered as an inspirational speaker and revolutionary innovator. Here are some of the best things he said over his four decades as one of the most important figures in the technology industry: 

Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven't found it yet, keep looking. Don't settle.


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