WEFOUNDA Festival of Ghosts


The Ghost Festival , also known as the Hungry Ghost Festival , Zhongyuan Jie (中元节), Gui Jie (鬼节) or Yulan Festival ( traditional Chinese : 盂蘭盆節 ; simplified Chinese : 盂兰盆节 ; pinyin : Yúlánpénjié ) is a traditional Buddhist and Taoist festival held in certain Asian countries. According to the Chinese calendar (a lunisolar calendar ), the Ghost Festival is on the 15th night of the seventh month (14th in southern China [ not in citation given ] ). [1]

In Chinese culture , the fifteenth day of the seventh month in the lunar calendar is called Ghost Day and the seventh month in general is regarded as the Ghost Month ( 鬼月 ), in which ghosts and spirits , including those of the deceased ancestors, come out from the lower realm . Distinct from both the Qingming Festival (in spring) and Double Ninth Festival (in autumn) in which living descendants pay homage to their deceased ancestors, during Ghost Festival, the deceased are believed to visit the living. [2]

Evidence of ancestral veneration in Chinese culture appears as early as its earliest records , with the Shang kings offering sacrifices to their forefathers. Many aspects of the present festival celebrated across East Asia derive from such native rituals in ancient China. [4]

His latest mask, Grand Nathaniel & The Ghosts, reincarnates the sound of virginity lost in the Reagan era — the dour dance beat of sexual ambivalence, the phony sweep of synth strings and organs, misfired drum machines, the raw edge of jaded guitars.

Backed by long time collaborators Brycen Gaddis, Ian Guidroz and Jim Kolacek, Burton’s turn as Grand Nathaniel & The Ghosts revisits the landscape of his misspent youth on the early frontiers of alternative rock.

Burton cribbed his artistic cues from years living in the fallout era of post-R.E.M. Athens, Ga., picking through the ashes of the southern American underground to find the scribblings of obscured legends like Pylon and The dB’s. Grand Nathaniel begins in the 1990s and works backwards, traveling from Athens up the East Coast on a reverse musical timeline, taking in the post-hardcore, prog positivity of DIY Washington D.C. (Trans Am) and the chipped-tooth chic of disco punk New York City (ESG, Liquid Liquid).

The Ghost Festival , also known as the Hungry Ghost Festival , Zhongyuan Jie (中元节), Gui Jie (鬼节) or Yulan Festival ( traditional Chinese : 盂蘭盆節 ; simplified Chinese : 盂兰盆节 ; pinyin : Yúlánpénjié ) is a traditional Buddhist and Taoist festival held in certain Asian countries. According to the Chinese calendar (a lunisolar calendar ), the Ghost Festival is on the 15th night of the seventh month (14th in southern China [ not in citation given ] ). [1]

In Chinese culture , the fifteenth day of the seventh month in the lunar calendar is called Ghost Day and the seventh month in general is regarded as the Ghost Month ( 鬼月 ), in which ghosts and spirits , including those of the deceased ancestors, come out from the lower realm . Distinct from both the Qingming Festival (in spring) and Double Ninth Festival (in autumn) in which living descendants pay homage to their deceased ancestors, during Ghost Festival, the deceased are believed to visit the living. [2]

Evidence of ancestral veneration in Chinese culture appears as early as its earliest records , with the Shang kings offering sacrifices to their forefathers. Many aspects of the present festival celebrated across East Asia derive from such native rituals in ancient China. [4]

His latest mask, Grand Nathaniel & The Ghosts, reincarnates the sound of virginity lost in the Reagan era — the dour dance beat of sexual ambivalence, the phony sweep of synth strings and organs, misfired drum machines, the raw edge of jaded guitars.

Backed by long time collaborators Brycen Gaddis, Ian Guidroz and Jim Kolacek, Burton’s turn as Grand Nathaniel & The Ghosts revisits the landscape of his misspent youth on the early frontiers of alternative rock.

Burton cribbed his artistic cues from years living in the fallout era of post-R.E.M. Athens, Ga., picking through the ashes of the southern American underground to find the scribblings of obscured legends like Pylon and The dB’s. Grand Nathaniel begins in the 1990s and works backwards, traveling from Athens up the East Coast on a reverse musical timeline, taking in the post-hardcore, prog positivity of DIY Washington D.C. (Trans Am) and the chipped-tooth chic of disco punk New York City (ESG, Liquid Liquid).

Karen Gernant, professor emerita of Chinese history at Southern Oregon University, translates contemporary Chinese fiction in collaboration with Chen Zeping.  Among their translations are:  Can Xue, Blue Light in the Sky and Other Stories (New Directions, 2006); Can Xue, Five Spice Street (Yale University Press, 2009); Eleven Contemporary Chinese Writers (Turnrow Books, 2010); Can Xue, Vertical Motion (Open Letter Books, 2011); Zhang Kangkang, White Poppies and Other Stories (Cornell East Asia Series, 2011); and Alai, Tibetan Soul (MerwinAsia, 2012).

Chen Zeping, professor of Chinese linguistics at Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou, China, has written more than thirty articles and papers for professional journals and international conferences, and has also published numerous books in his field.  He has also taught at Southern Oregon University and at Ehime University in Matsuyama, Japan.  In 2005, he received a fellowship from the Japan Foundation for the Promotion of Science to present a series of lectures in Japan.  He returned there to present lectures in early 2008.

Since 1999, he has also collaborated with Karen Gernant in translating contemporary Chinese fiction into English.  Their translations have appeared in Conjunctions , Manoa , turnrow , Chinese Literature , Black Warrior Review , Ninth Letter , and Words without Borders .

Hungry ghosts are pitiable creatures. They have huge, empty stomachs, but their mouths are too small and their necks too thin to take in food. Sometimes they breathe fire; sometimes what food they do eat turns to ash in their mouths. They are doomed to live with incessant craving.

The Hungry Ghost Realm is one of the Six Realms of Samsara , into which beings are reborn. Understood as a psychological rather than a physical state, hungry ghosts might be thought of as people with addictions, ​compulsions and obsessions.

Hungry ghost festivals are held in many Buddhist countries to give the poor creatures some relief. They are offered paper money (not real currency), food and diversions such as plays, dancing and opera. Most of these festivals are held in the summer months, July and August.

The Ghost Festival , also known as the Hungry Ghost Festival , Zhongyuan Jie (中元节), Gui Jie (鬼节) or Yulan Festival ( traditional Chinese : 盂蘭盆節 ; simplified Chinese : 盂兰盆节 ; pinyin : Yúlánpénjié ) is a traditional Buddhist and Taoist festival held in certain Asian countries. According to the Chinese calendar (a lunisolar calendar ), the Ghost Festival is on the 15th night of the seventh month (14th in southern China [ not in citation given ] ). [1]

In Chinese culture , the fifteenth day of the seventh month in the lunar calendar is called Ghost Day and the seventh month in general is regarded as the Ghost Month ( 鬼月 ), in which ghosts and spirits , including those of the deceased ancestors, come out from the lower realm . Distinct from both the Qingming Festival (in spring) and Double Ninth Festival (in autumn) in which living descendants pay homage to their deceased ancestors, during Ghost Festival, the deceased are believed to visit the living. [2]

Evidence of ancestral veneration in Chinese culture appears as early as its earliest records , with the Shang kings offering sacrifices to their forefathers. Many aspects of the present festival celebrated across East Asia derive from such native rituals in ancient China. [4]

The Ghost Festival , also known as the Hungry Ghost Festival , Zhongyuan Jie (中元节), Gui Jie (鬼节) or Yulan Festival ( traditional Chinese : 盂蘭盆節 ; simplified Chinese : 盂兰盆节 ; pinyin : Yúlánpénjié ) is a traditional Buddhist and Taoist festival held in certain Asian countries. According to the Chinese calendar (a lunisolar calendar ), the Ghost Festival is on the 15th night of the seventh month (14th in southern China [ not in citation given ] ). [1]

In Chinese culture , the fifteenth day of the seventh month in the lunar calendar is called Ghost Day and the seventh month in general is regarded as the Ghost Month ( 鬼月 ), in which ghosts and spirits , including those of the deceased ancestors, come out from the lower realm . Distinct from both the Qingming Festival (in spring) and Double Ninth Festival (in autumn) in which living descendants pay homage to their deceased ancestors, during Ghost Festival, the deceased are believed to visit the living. [2]

Evidence of ancestral veneration in Chinese culture appears as early as its earliest records , with the Shang kings offering sacrifices to their forefathers. Many aspects of the present festival celebrated across East Asia derive from such native rituals in ancient China. [4]

His latest mask, Grand Nathaniel & The Ghosts, reincarnates the sound of virginity lost in the Reagan era — the dour dance beat of sexual ambivalence, the phony sweep of synth strings and organs, misfired drum machines, the raw edge of jaded guitars.

Backed by long time collaborators Brycen Gaddis, Ian Guidroz and Jim Kolacek, Burton’s turn as Grand Nathaniel & The Ghosts revisits the landscape of his misspent youth on the early frontiers of alternative rock.

Burton cribbed his artistic cues from years living in the fallout era of post-R.E.M. Athens, Ga., picking through the ashes of the southern American underground to find the scribblings of obscured legends like Pylon and The dB’s. Grand Nathaniel begins in the 1990s and works backwards, traveling from Athens up the East Coast on a reverse musical timeline, taking in the post-hardcore, prog positivity of DIY Washington D.C. (Trans Am) and the chipped-tooth chic of disco punk New York City (ESG, Liquid Liquid).

Karen Gernant, professor emerita of Chinese history at Southern Oregon University, translates contemporary Chinese fiction in collaboration with Chen Zeping.  Among their translations are:  Can Xue, Blue Light in the Sky and Other Stories (New Directions, 2006); Can Xue, Five Spice Street (Yale University Press, 2009); Eleven Contemporary Chinese Writers (Turnrow Books, 2010); Can Xue, Vertical Motion (Open Letter Books, 2011); Zhang Kangkang, White Poppies and Other Stories (Cornell East Asia Series, 2011); and Alai, Tibetan Soul (MerwinAsia, 2012).

Chen Zeping, professor of Chinese linguistics at Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou, China, has written more than thirty articles and papers for professional journals and international conferences, and has also published numerous books in his field.  He has also taught at Southern Oregon University and at Ehime University in Matsuyama, Japan.  In 2005, he received a fellowship from the Japan Foundation for the Promotion of Science to present a series of lectures in Japan.  He returned there to present lectures in early 2008.

Since 1999, he has also collaborated with Karen Gernant in translating contemporary Chinese fiction into English.  Their translations have appeared in Conjunctions , Manoa , turnrow , Chinese Literature , Black Warrior Review , Ninth Letter , and Words without Borders .


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