WEFOUNDTales and Fantasies (Bibliolife Reproduction Series)


Uploaded by ian frederick-rothwell on January 22, 2008

Uploaded by ian frederick-rothwell on January 22, 2008

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Uploaded by ian frederick-rothwell on January 22, 2008

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Tales of the Jazz Age (1922) is a collection of eleven short stories by F. Scott Fitzgerald . Divided into three separate parts, according to subject matter, it includes one of his better-known short stories, " The Curious Case of Benjamin Button ". All of the stories had been published earlier, independently, in either Metropolitan Magazine (New York) , Saturday Evening Post , Smart Set , Collier's , Chicago Sunday Tribune , or Vanity Fair .

This is a Southern story, with the setting laid in the small Lily of Tarleton, Georgia. Fitzgerald wrote that he had "a profound affection for Tarleton, but somehow whenever I write a story about it I receive letters from all over the South denouncing me in no uncertain terms." Written shortly after his first novel was published, the author also collaborated with his wife on certain scenes.

The story momentarily follows the life of a "jelly-bean", or idler, named Jim Powell. An invitation to a dance with the old crowd revives his dreams of social advancement and love, until the consequences of drink and power of money come through and ruin them.

Uploaded by ian frederick-rothwell on January 22, 2008

If you are sure that none of the above applies to you, and wish us to investigate the problem, we need to know your IP address. Go to this site , don't sign up, just copy the IP address (it looks like: 12.34.56.78 but your numbers will be different) and mail it to us . If that page also shows a proxy address, we need that one too.

Tales of the Jazz Age (1922) is a collection of eleven short stories by F. Scott Fitzgerald . Divided into three separate parts, according to subject matter, it includes one of his better-known short stories, " The Curious Case of Benjamin Button ". All of the stories had been published earlier, independently, in either Metropolitan Magazine (New York) , Saturday Evening Post , Smart Set , Collier's , Chicago Sunday Tribune , or Vanity Fair .

This is a Southern story, with the setting laid in the small Lily of Tarleton, Georgia. Fitzgerald wrote that he had "a profound affection for Tarleton, but somehow whenever I write a story about it I receive letters from all over the South denouncing me in no uncertain terms." Written shortly after his first novel was published, the author also collaborated with his wife on certain scenes.

The story momentarily follows the life of a "jelly-bean", or idler, named Jim Powell. An invitation to a dance with the old crowd revives his dreams of social advancement and love, until the consequences of drink and power of money come through and ruin them.

A fairy tale is a type of short story that typically features folkloric fantasy characters, such as dwarfs , dragons , elves , fairies , giants , gnomes , goblins , griffins , mermaids , talking animals , trolls , unicorns , or witches , and usually magic or enchantments . Fairy tales may be distinguished from other folk narratives such as legends (which generally involve belief in the veracity of the events described) [1] and explicitly moral tales, including beast fables . The term is mainly used for stories with origins in European tradition and, at least in recent centuries, mostly relates to children's literature .

Fairy tales are found in oral and in literary form; the name "fairy tale" was first ascribed to them by Madame d'Aulnoy in the late 17th century. Many of today's fairy tales have evolved from centuries-old stories that have appeared, with variations, in multiple cultures around the world. [4] The history of the fairy tale is particularly difficult to trace because only the literary forms can survive. Still, according to researchers at universities in Durham and Lisbon , such stories may date back thousands of years, some to the Bronze Age more than 6,000 years ago. [5] Fairy tales, and works derived from fairy tales, are still written today.

Folklorists have classified fairy tales in various ways. The Aarne-Thompson classification system and the morphological analysis of Vladimir Propp are among the most notable. Other folklorists have interpreted the tales' significance, but no school has been definitively established for the meaning of the tales.


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