WEFOUNDDragon's Fire - Chinese Simplified (Chinese Edition)


Chinese dragons are powerful and benevolent symbols in Chinese culture, with supposed control over watery phenomenon, e.g. summoning rain during a drought. Dragons are everywhere in China — in legends, festivals, astrology, art, names, and idioms.

Chinese dragons are seen as lucky and good —  quite different to  the evil, dangerous, fire-breathing dragons of most Western stories. 

Dragons are found in many aspects of Chinese culture from legends about Chinese ancestry to modern mascots, from festival events to astrology to idioms.

Not enough dragons for you? Alright then, you dragon-obsessive. Why not pop over and visit our Common Welsh Green and the Swedish Short-Snout ? And be sure to come back tomorrow to meet Harry’s dragon nemesis. We’re sure you know which one.

The most vibrant and spectacular way of expressing fondness for the dragon is the dragon dance. This has evolved from what was a ritual rain dance into a popular entertainment performed during the period from Spring Festival until the Lantern Festival . The second day of the second lunar month is the Han people's special time - 'Dragon Heads-raising Day'. People could not tonsure their hair from the start of the lunar New Year until then. The activities for celebration are still for a good rain. Other big festivals related to the dragon include the Dragon Boat Festival and those of ethnic groups like Zhuang, Yao, Hani, and so on.

Chinese dragons are powerful and benevolent symbols in Chinese culture, with supposed control over watery phenomenon, e.g. summoning rain during a drought. Dragons are everywhere in China — in legends, festivals, astrology, art, names, and idioms.

Chinese dragons are seen as lucky and good —  quite different to  the evil, dangerous, fire-breathing dragons of most Western stories. 

Dragons are found in many aspects of Chinese culture from legends about Chinese ancestry to modern mascots, from festival events to astrology to idioms.

Not enough dragons for you? Alright then, you dragon-obsessive. Why not pop over and visit our Common Welsh Green and the Swedish Short-Snout ? And be sure to come back tomorrow to meet Harry’s dragon nemesis. We’re sure you know which one.

The most vibrant and spectacular way of expressing fondness for the dragon is the dragon dance. This has evolved from what was a ritual rain dance into a popular entertainment performed during the period from Spring Festival until the Lantern Festival . The second day of the second lunar month is the Han people's special time - 'Dragon Heads-raising Day'. People could not tonsure their hair from the start of the lunar New Year until then. The activities for celebration are still for a good rain. Other big festivals related to the dragon include the Dragon Boat Festival and those of ethnic groups like Zhuang, Yao, Hani, and so on.

The Dragon is the fifth of the 12 Chinese zodiac animals. Each year has an animal sign according to a 12-year cycle. Years of the Dragon include 1928, 1940, 1952, 1964, 1976, 1988, 2000, 2012, and 2024.

People born in a year of the Dragon are called “Dragons” in China. If you were born in 1940, 1952, 1964, 1976, 1988, 2000, or 2012, then you’re a Dragon.

However, Dragon years are generally dated by the Chinese lunar calendar (starting on Chinese New Year), so if you were born in January or February, use the tool on the right to check whether you’re a Dragon.

Chinese dragons are powerful and benevolent symbols in Chinese culture, with supposed control over watery phenomenon, e.g. summoning rain during a drought. Dragons are everywhere in China — in legends, festivals, astrology, art, names, and idioms.

Chinese dragons are seen as lucky and good —  quite different to  the evil, dangerous, fire-breathing dragons of most Western stories. 

Dragons are found in many aspects of Chinese culture from legends about Chinese ancestry to modern mascots, from festival events to astrology to idioms.

Chinese dragons are powerful and benevolent symbols in Chinese culture, with supposed control over watery phenomenon, e.g. summoning rain during a drought. Dragons are everywhere in China — in legends, festivals, astrology, art, names, and idioms.

Chinese dragons are seen as lucky and good —  quite different to  the evil, dangerous, fire-breathing dragons of most Western stories. 

Dragons are found in many aspects of Chinese culture from legends about Chinese ancestry to modern mascots, from festival events to astrology to idioms.

Not enough dragons for you? Alright then, you dragon-obsessive. Why not pop over and visit our Common Welsh Green and the Swedish Short-Snout ? And be sure to come back tomorrow to meet Harry’s dragon nemesis. We’re sure you know which one.


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