WEFOUNDEarth Lost Without Power


Two years ago, the Earth barely missed getting blasted by an extremely powerful solar storm. Most of us had no idea. But had it hit us, the storm could have knocked out power grids, left millions of people without power for months, and caused widespread chaos.

NASA  recently posted new details on this unnerving close call.  On July 23, 2012, the sun unleashed two large coronal mass ejections — bursts of charged plasma — and sent them hurtling toward Earth's orbit. This was one of the most powerful bouts of space weather seen in more than 150 years.

Had those bursts hit the Earth's magnetic field, they could have induced strong ground currents capable of overloading our electric grids and knocking out transformers, leaving entire regions without power.

As snow has changed over to sleet and rain in the wake of the massive storm that hit the state, the number of customers left in the dark has dramatically climbed all morning.

Fewer than 200 homes were without power at daybreak. But those figures climbed to more than 10,000 customers by 9 a.m. And by 10 a.m., the total number of customers in New Jersey without electricity had climbed to 35,500 people.

"The main driver for outages right now is strong winds," said Frank Tedesco, a spokesman for Atlantic City Electric Co. "The coastal areas may see winds gusts up to 60 mph."

Scientists have recently been able to identify many exoplanets that reside within a ‘ Goldilocks Zone ’, which is the region around a host star where it is thought possible a planet with sufficient atmospheric pressure could sustain liquid water on its surface. Though these planets are within the right orbit of the star, their ability to sustain life is not guaranteed; these exoplanets may be missing their magnetic shielding, which would make them susceptible to damaging radiation.

The magnetic field that protects Earth extends from the inner core to where it meets charged particles coming from the Sun, also known as solar wind. The magnetic field deflects most of these particles, which otherwise would strip off our ozone layer, the layer of our atmosphere responsible for protecting Earth from ultraviolet radiation. This field is generated and maintained through a rotating, convecting and electrically conducting fluid at its core called a geodynamo.

Venus may have had oceans deep in its past that were vaporised once the runaway greenhouse effect took hold. Any water would have been broken down by photons; with no magnetic field the free hydrogen was expelled into space by the solar wind. If an exoplanet had surface water, this water could get blasted away by stellar winds if the planet does not have a strong magnetic field.

Two years ago, the Earth barely missed getting blasted by an extremely powerful solar storm. Most of us had no idea. But had it hit us, the storm could have knocked out power grids, left millions of people without power for months, and caused widespread chaos.

NASA  recently posted new details on this unnerving close call.  On July 23, 2012, the sun unleashed two large coronal mass ejections — bursts of charged plasma — and sent them hurtling toward Earth's orbit. This was one of the most powerful bouts of space weather seen in more than 150 years.

Had those bursts hit the Earth's magnetic field, they could have induced strong ground currents capable of overloading our electric grids and knocking out transformers, leaving entire regions without power.

As snow has changed over to sleet and rain in the wake of the massive storm that hit the state, the number of customers left in the dark has dramatically climbed all morning.

Fewer than 200 homes were without power at daybreak. But those figures climbed to more than 10,000 customers by 9 a.m. And by 10 a.m., the total number of customers in New Jersey without electricity had climbed to 35,500 people.

"The main driver for outages right now is strong winds," said Frank Tedesco, a spokesman for Atlantic City Electric Co. "The coastal areas may see winds gusts up to 60 mph."

Scientists have recently been able to identify many exoplanets that reside within a ‘ Goldilocks Zone ’, which is the region around a host star where it is thought possible a planet with sufficient atmospheric pressure could sustain liquid water on its surface. Though these planets are within the right orbit of the star, their ability to sustain life is not guaranteed; these exoplanets may be missing their magnetic shielding, which would make them susceptible to damaging radiation.

The magnetic field that protects Earth extends from the inner core to where it meets charged particles coming from the Sun, also known as solar wind. The magnetic field deflects most of these particles, which otherwise would strip off our ozone layer, the layer of our atmosphere responsible for protecting Earth from ultraviolet radiation. This field is generated and maintained through a rotating, convecting and electrically conducting fluid at its core called a geodynamo.

Venus may have had oceans deep in its past that were vaporised once the runaway greenhouse effect took hold. Any water would have been broken down by photons; with no magnetic field the free hydrogen was expelled into space by the solar wind. If an exoplanet had surface water, this water could get blasted away by stellar winds if the planet does not have a strong magnetic field.

A NASA satellite has captured dramatic photos of Puerto Rico before and after a massive blackout during which almost 1.5 million homes lost power late Wednesday (Sept. 21), according to NASA's Earth Observatory.

Puerto Rico plunged into darkness after a fire at the Aguirre power plant, a substation in the southern part of the island, triggered a cascade of problems across Puerto Rico's aging electrical grid.

The power outage was so stark that NASA's satellites could "see" it from space. The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aboard the Suomi NPP satellite took photos before and after the blackout. The first, taken at 2:50 a.m. local time (AST) on Sept. 21 show Puerto Rico bathed in light. [ Earth from Above: 101 Stunning Images from Orbit ]

Two years ago, the Earth barely missed getting blasted by an extremely powerful solar storm. Most of us had no idea. But had it hit us, the storm could have knocked out power grids, left millions of people without power for months, and caused widespread chaos.

NASA  recently posted new details on this unnerving close call.  On July 23, 2012, the sun unleashed two large coronal mass ejections — bursts of charged plasma — and sent them hurtling toward Earth's orbit. This was one of the most powerful bouts of space weather seen in more than 150 years.

Had those bursts hit the Earth's magnetic field, they could have induced strong ground currents capable of overloading our electric grids and knocking out transformers, leaving entire regions without power.

As snow has changed over to sleet and rain in the wake of the massive storm that hit the state, the number of customers left in the dark has dramatically climbed all morning.

Fewer than 200 homes were without power at daybreak. But those figures climbed to more than 10,000 customers by 9 a.m. And by 10 a.m., the total number of customers in New Jersey without electricity had climbed to 35,500 people.

"The main driver for outages right now is strong winds," said Frank Tedesco, a spokesman for Atlantic City Electric Co. "The coastal areas may see winds gusts up to 60 mph."

Scientists have recently been able to identify many exoplanets that reside within a ‘ Goldilocks Zone ’, which is the region around a host star where it is thought possible a planet with sufficient atmospheric pressure could sustain liquid water on its surface. Though these planets are within the right orbit of the star, their ability to sustain life is not guaranteed; these exoplanets may be missing their magnetic shielding, which would make them susceptible to damaging radiation.

The magnetic field that protects Earth extends from the inner core to where it meets charged particles coming from the Sun, also known as solar wind. The magnetic field deflects most of these particles, which otherwise would strip off our ozone layer, the layer of our atmosphere responsible for protecting Earth from ultraviolet radiation. This field is generated and maintained through a rotating, convecting and electrically conducting fluid at its core called a geodynamo.

Venus may have had oceans deep in its past that were vaporised once the runaway greenhouse effect took hold. Any water would have been broken down by photons; with no magnetic field the free hydrogen was expelled into space by the solar wind. If an exoplanet had surface water, this water could get blasted away by stellar winds if the planet does not have a strong magnetic field.

A NASA satellite has captured dramatic photos of Puerto Rico before and after a massive blackout during which almost 1.5 million homes lost power late Wednesday (Sept. 21), according to NASA's Earth Observatory.

Puerto Rico plunged into darkness after a fire at the Aguirre power plant, a substation in the southern part of the island, triggered a cascade of problems across Puerto Rico's aging electrical grid.

The power outage was so stark that NASA's satellites could "see" it from space. The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aboard the Suomi NPP satellite took photos before and after the blackout. The first, taken at 2:50 a.m. local time (AST) on Sept. 21 show Puerto Rico bathed in light. [ Earth from Above: 101 Stunning Images from Orbit ]

When greed for power consumes people’s souls, there is no limit to how far they will go in pursuit of their goals, regardless of the destruction they may wreak on others.

In this science fiction novel, powerful neutron bombs devastate human life on earth, leaving the survivors to pick up the pieces.

Maria, now a category three storm, has been lashing the Dominican Republic further west and heading towards the Turks and Caicos Islands.

It is the second devastating storm to hit the Caribbean this hurricane season - the first being category five Irma earlier in September.

The island's Governor Ricardo Rossello described the hurricane as "the most devastating storm in a century" and said that Maria had hit the island's electricity grid so badly that it could take months to restore power.

Two years ago, the Earth barely missed getting blasted by an extremely powerful solar storm. Most of us had no idea. But had it hit us, the storm could have knocked out power grids, left millions of people without power for months, and caused widespread chaos.

NASA  recently posted new details on this unnerving close call.  On July 23, 2012, the sun unleashed two large coronal mass ejections — bursts of charged plasma — and sent them hurtling toward Earth's orbit. This was one of the most powerful bouts of space weather seen in more than 150 years.

Had those bursts hit the Earth's magnetic field, they could have induced strong ground currents capable of overloading our electric grids and knocking out transformers, leaving entire regions without power.

As snow has changed over to sleet and rain in the wake of the massive storm that hit the state, the number of customers left in the dark has dramatically climbed all morning.

Fewer than 200 homes were without power at daybreak. But those figures climbed to more than 10,000 customers by 9 a.m. And by 10 a.m., the total number of customers in New Jersey without electricity had climbed to 35,500 people.

"The main driver for outages right now is strong winds," said Frank Tedesco, a spokesman for Atlantic City Electric Co. "The coastal areas may see winds gusts up to 60 mph."

Scientists have recently been able to identify many exoplanets that reside within a ‘ Goldilocks Zone ’, which is the region around a host star where it is thought possible a planet with sufficient atmospheric pressure could sustain liquid water on its surface. Though these planets are within the right orbit of the star, their ability to sustain life is not guaranteed; these exoplanets may be missing their magnetic shielding, which would make them susceptible to damaging radiation.

The magnetic field that protects Earth extends from the inner core to where it meets charged particles coming from the Sun, also known as solar wind. The magnetic field deflects most of these particles, which otherwise would strip off our ozone layer, the layer of our atmosphere responsible for protecting Earth from ultraviolet radiation. This field is generated and maintained through a rotating, convecting and electrically conducting fluid at its core called a geodynamo.

Venus may have had oceans deep in its past that were vaporised once the runaway greenhouse effect took hold. Any water would have been broken down by photons; with no magnetic field the free hydrogen was expelled into space by the solar wind. If an exoplanet had surface water, this water could get blasted away by stellar winds if the planet does not have a strong magnetic field.

A NASA satellite has captured dramatic photos of Puerto Rico before and after a massive blackout during which almost 1.5 million homes lost power late Wednesday (Sept. 21), according to NASA's Earth Observatory.

Puerto Rico plunged into darkness after a fire at the Aguirre power plant, a substation in the southern part of the island, triggered a cascade of problems across Puerto Rico's aging electrical grid.

The power outage was so stark that NASA's satellites could "see" it from space. The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aboard the Suomi NPP satellite took photos before and after the blackout. The first, taken at 2:50 a.m. local time (AST) on Sept. 21 show Puerto Rico bathed in light. [ Earth from Above: 101 Stunning Images from Orbit ]

When greed for power consumes people’s souls, there is no limit to how far they will go in pursuit of their goals, regardless of the destruction they may wreak on others.

In this science fiction novel, powerful neutron bombs devastate human life on earth, leaving the survivors to pick up the pieces.

Two years ago, the Earth barely missed getting blasted by an extremely powerful solar storm. Most of us had no idea. But had it hit us, the storm could have knocked out power grids, left millions of people without power for months, and caused widespread chaos.

NASA  recently posted new details on this unnerving close call.  On July 23, 2012, the sun unleashed two large coronal mass ejections — bursts of charged plasma — and sent them hurtling toward Earth's orbit. This was one of the most powerful bouts of space weather seen in more than 150 years.

Had those bursts hit the Earth's magnetic field, they could have induced strong ground currents capable of overloading our electric grids and knocking out transformers, leaving entire regions without power.

Two years ago, the Earth barely missed getting blasted by an extremely powerful solar storm. Most of us had no idea. But had it hit us, the storm could have knocked out power grids, left millions of people without power for months, and caused widespread chaos.

NASA  recently posted new details on this unnerving close call.  On July 23, 2012, the sun unleashed two large coronal mass ejections — bursts of charged plasma — and sent them hurtling toward Earth's orbit. This was one of the most powerful bouts of space weather seen in more than 150 years.

Had those bursts hit the Earth's magnetic field, they could have induced strong ground currents capable of overloading our electric grids and knocking out transformers, leaving entire regions without power.

As snow has changed over to sleet and rain in the wake of the massive storm that hit the state, the number of customers left in the dark has dramatically climbed all morning.

Fewer than 200 homes were without power at daybreak. But those figures climbed to more than 10,000 customers by 9 a.m. And by 10 a.m., the total number of customers in New Jersey without electricity had climbed to 35,500 people.

"The main driver for outages right now is strong winds," said Frank Tedesco, a spokesman for Atlantic City Electric Co. "The coastal areas may see winds gusts up to 60 mph."


51QI9RktmFL