WEFOUND100 Classic Cakes (The Australian Women's Weekly: New Essentials)


1. For the cake: Preheat the oven to 175°C. Butter the bottoms and sides of two 9-inch round cake pans; dust with flour, and tap out the excess.

Beat the butter, sugar and oil in a large bowl with an electric mixer on medium-high speed until light in color and fluffy, about 5 minutes. Beat in the eggs, one at a time, and then the vanilla until combined.

3. Alternate folding the flour mixture and the milk into the batter with a spatula, adding the flour in three additions and the milk in two, starting and ending with the flour, until just smooth. Divide the batter evenly between the prepared pans.

Your wedding cake is like the exclamation point on the reception and it should be a total reflection of your style and taste (pun intended). See 1000's of wedding cake photos and then find the right baker to help you pull it off.

Your wedding cake may just be the most significant confection you ever buy, so it's key to know what you're getting into. A good place to start is by reading our top tips from wedding cake bakers from around the country. Next, the fun part (well, besides the tasting), is to start searching through wedding cake pictures to help figure out which wedding cake designs suit your style. From classic cakes to more ornate styles, we have something for every taste – literally! Then check out local wedding cake bakers to find a pro near you.

Serious home bakers will want to master these crowd-pleasing recipes for cheesecake, chocolate cake, carrot cake, and more.

Serious home bakers will want to master these crowd-pleasing recipes for cheesecake, chocolate cake, carrot cake, and more.

The classic sponge cake is not just plain vanilla, it's an essential recipe in every baker's repetoire. It's a versatile cake that can be customized with a variety of fillings and icings.

1. For the cake: Preheat the oven to 175°C. Butter the bottoms and sides of two 9-inch round cake pans; dust with flour, and tap out the excess.

Beat the butter, sugar and oil in a large bowl with an electric mixer on medium-high speed until light in color and fluffy, about 5 minutes. Beat in the eggs, one at a time, and then the vanilla until combined.

3. Alternate folding the flour mixture and the milk into the batter with a spatula, adding the flour in three additions and the milk in two, starting and ending with the flour, until just smooth. Divide the batter evenly between the prepared pans.

1. For the cake: Preheat the oven to 175°C. Butter the bottoms and sides of two 9-inch round cake pans; dust with flour, and tap out the excess.

Beat the butter, sugar and oil in a large bowl with an electric mixer on medium-high speed until light in color and fluffy, about 5 minutes. Beat in the eggs, one at a time, and then the vanilla until combined.

3. Alternate folding the flour mixture and the milk into the batter with a spatula, adding the flour in three additions and the milk in two, starting and ending with the flour, until just smooth. Divide the batter evenly between the prepared pans.

Your wedding cake is like the exclamation point on the reception and it should be a total reflection of your style and taste (pun intended). See 1000's of wedding cake photos and then find the right baker to help you pull it off.

Your wedding cake may just be the most significant confection you ever buy, so it's key to know what you're getting into. A good place to start is by reading our top tips from wedding cake bakers from around the country. Next, the fun part (well, besides the tasting), is to start searching through wedding cake pictures to help figure out which wedding cake designs suit your style. From classic cakes to more ornate styles, we have something for every taste – literally! Then check out local wedding cake bakers to find a pro near you.

1. For the cake: Preheat the oven to 175°C. Butter the bottoms and sides of two 9-inch round cake pans; dust with flour, and tap out the excess.

Beat the butter, sugar and oil in a large bowl with an electric mixer on medium-high speed until light in color and fluffy, about 5 minutes. Beat in the eggs, one at a time, and then the vanilla until combined.

3. Alternate folding the flour mixture and the milk into the batter with a spatula, adding the flour in three additions and the milk in two, starting and ending with the flour, until just smooth. Divide the batter evenly between the prepared pans.

Your wedding cake is like the exclamation point on the reception and it should be a total reflection of your style and taste (pun intended). See 1000's of wedding cake photos and then find the right baker to help you pull it off.

Your wedding cake may just be the most significant confection you ever buy, so it's key to know what you're getting into. A good place to start is by reading our top tips from wedding cake bakers from around the country. Next, the fun part (well, besides the tasting), is to start searching through wedding cake pictures to help figure out which wedding cake designs suit your style. From classic cakes to more ornate styles, we have something for every taste – literally! Then check out local wedding cake bakers to find a pro near you.

Serious home bakers will want to master these crowd-pleasing recipes for cheesecake, chocolate cake, carrot cake, and more.

Serious home bakers will want to master these crowd-pleasing recipes for cheesecake, chocolate cake, carrot cake, and more.

The classic sponge cake is not just plain vanilla, it's an essential recipe in every baker's repetoire. It's a versatile cake that can be customized with a variety of fillings and icings.

If I asked you to close your eyes and think of a cake, you might picture multiple layers covered in billowy frosting or a grocery store sheet cake with tongue-coating icing tinted an unnatural blue. Perhaps, if you grew up like me, the image that comes to mind could be a birthday cake made from boxed yellow mix and frosted with chocolate fudge from a small plastic tub (if it didn’t get spooned directly into my mouth first).

Regardless of what type waxes nostalgic for you, cake holds a special place of honor in the United States. There is rarely a celebration, however large or small, that does not include one in some form or another.

That cake accompanies celebrations is nothing new; prior to the mid-nineteenth century, they were made for crowded events such as weddings and community gatherings, but rarely, if ever, for everyday dessert. This is partially because cake-baking was labor intensive—an all-day affair—and also because many of the ingredients involved, particularly spices and sugar, were prohibitively expensive for the general public.


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