WEFOUNDScribes of Speculative Fiction - A Collection of Interviews


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Designated in October 2013 by Black SFF writers Balogun Ojetade and Milton J. Davis, Black Speculative Fiction Month is dedicated to celebrating Black speculative fiction creators in literature, film, and more. While reading Black speculative fiction has always been a thrilling experience, I’ve recently learned that creating it can help me imagine my most magical self.

In late September, I finished “Moon Bloom” my very first fantasy short story with Black queer characters. The story was inspired by many things, but the most important factor was the desire to give myself the representation I’ve wanted to see for years.

Since grade school, I’ve adored fantasy fiction and how the stories paint the imagination with magic, adventure, and wonder. I grew up with the Harry Potter series, which served as an entry point for other fantasy books like Tamora Pierce”s Tortall series and Garth Nix’s Abhorsen trilogy. However, I didn’t read any books by or featuring Black people until 2010.

A collection of interviews from some of the leading and up-and-coming names in genre fiction, including Eduardo Sanchez, William Nolan, Raymond Benson, Jack Ketcham, Raymond Feist, Joe Schrieber, Kevin J. Anderson, and Roger Price.

In this second volume to Scribes of Speculative Fiction: A Collection of Interviews, author Cristopher DeRose’s interviews provide insights into the minds of today’s best authors and an eclectic mix of penetrating insights into their unique worlds. If you’re a fan of James Bond, Rift War, The Blair Witch Project, Star Wars, Logan’s Run, X-Files, Dune, or The Tomorrow People, you’ll discover the unforgettably diverse blend of talents behind these works that thrilled an entire generation and still stimulate the imaginations of new readers.

About the author: father, photographer, musician, writer and martial artist, Cristopher DeRose has published more than a hundred articles in magazines, such as Filmax and Cemetery Dance. He was a Staff Writer for the Sci-Fi Channel for several years. He worked as Editor for Dark Matter Magazine: A Chronicle of the Speculative Mind for its three-year run. His nonfiction books include Cobra on My Left, Leopard on My Right; and Scribes of Speculative Fiction Vol. I and Scribes of Speculative Fiction Vol. II. His fiction books include To Cast a Violent Shadow and 2020 Eternal. He lives in Los Angeles, California.

The psychic entity or sentient Warp force known as Tzeentch is perhaps the most enigmatic of the so-called Chaos Gods or Ruinous Powers . Tzeentch, the Changer of Ways, is the god of sorcery, knowledge, scheming, mutation, and change. He embodies mortals' desires for evolution, improvement, innovation, and progress as well as their dreams of wealth, prosperity, and a better tomorrow. While many perceive these motivations as healthy, wholesome, and perhaps even necessary to mortal existence, Tzeentch, the Great Conspirator, works to corrupt the aspirations and ambitions of Mankind and xenos alike, and to leverage these hopes and dreams for his own nefarious ends.

Upon learning of the failure of the Rubric, Magnus banished Ahriman. This was the first of many schisms that split the Thousand Sons, divisions that eventually caused estrangement from their own Primarch. As a result of internal strife, the Thousand Sons effectively no longer function as a true Legion. Instead, they fight as isolated warbands and individual warriors. Some serve Tzeentch devoutly, others begrudgingly, and others as mindless conduits for the devastating sorcerous power of the Warp.

The air fills with kaleidoscopic bursts of magical energy as the convocations of the Great Conspirator materialise for battle. To mortal eyes, the different daemonic legions of Tzeentch are impossible to distinguish, each one as bizarre as the next, yet there is method within the madness -- although none save the Architect of Fate himself could truly comprehend it.

Traditionally seen as the copycats of antiquity, the scribes emerge here as the literate elite who held the key to the production as well as the transmission of texts. Van der Toorn’s account of scribal culture opens a new perspective on the origins of the Hebrew Bible, revealing how the individual books of the Bible and the authors associated with them were products of the social and intellectual world of the scribes. By taking us inside that world, this book yields a new and arresting appreciation of the Hebrew Scriptures.

Now Available: The digital Loeb Classical Library ( loebclassics.com ) extends the founding mission of James Loeb with an interconnected, fully searchable, perpetually growing virtual library of all that is important in Greek and Latin literature.

Find new facing-page translations of classic works from the Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library , I Tatti Renaissance Library , Loeb Classical Library , and Murty Classical Library of India .

With an OverDrive account, you can save your favorite libraries for at-a-glance information about availability. Find out more about OverDrive accounts.

Designated in October 2013 by Black SFF writers Balogun Ojetade and Milton J. Davis, Black Speculative Fiction Month is dedicated to celebrating Black speculative fiction creators in literature, film, and more. While reading Black speculative fiction has always been a thrilling experience, I’ve recently learned that creating it can help me imagine my most magical self.

In late September, I finished “Moon Bloom” my very first fantasy short story with Black queer characters. The story was inspired by many things, but the most important factor was the desire to give myself the representation I’ve wanted to see for years.

Since grade school, I’ve adored fantasy fiction and how the stories paint the imagination with magic, adventure, and wonder. I grew up with the Harry Potter series, which served as an entry point for other fantasy books like Tamora Pierce”s Tortall series and Garth Nix’s Abhorsen trilogy. However, I didn’t read any books by or featuring Black people until 2010.

A collection of interviews from some of the leading and up-and-coming names in genre fiction, including Eduardo Sanchez, William Nolan, Raymond Benson, Jack Ketcham, Raymond Feist, Joe Schrieber, Kevin J. Anderson, and Roger Price.

In this second volume to Scribes of Speculative Fiction: A Collection of Interviews, author Cristopher DeRose’s interviews provide insights into the minds of today’s best authors and an eclectic mix of penetrating insights into their unique worlds. If you’re a fan of James Bond, Rift War, The Blair Witch Project, Star Wars, Logan’s Run, X-Files, Dune, or The Tomorrow People, you’ll discover the unforgettably diverse blend of talents behind these works that thrilled an entire generation and still stimulate the imaginations of new readers.

About the author: father, photographer, musician, writer and martial artist, Cristopher DeRose has published more than a hundred articles in magazines, such as Filmax and Cemetery Dance. He was a Staff Writer for the Sci-Fi Channel for several years. He worked as Editor for Dark Matter Magazine: A Chronicle of the Speculative Mind for its three-year run. His nonfiction books include Cobra on My Left, Leopard on My Right; and Scribes of Speculative Fiction Vol. I and Scribes of Speculative Fiction Vol. II. His fiction books include To Cast a Violent Shadow and 2020 Eternal. He lives in Los Angeles, California.

The psychic entity or sentient Warp force known as Tzeentch is perhaps the most enigmatic of the so-called Chaos Gods or Ruinous Powers . Tzeentch, the Changer of Ways, is the god of sorcery, knowledge, scheming, mutation, and change. He embodies mortals' desires for evolution, improvement, innovation, and progress as well as their dreams of wealth, prosperity, and a better tomorrow. While many perceive these motivations as healthy, wholesome, and perhaps even necessary to mortal existence, Tzeentch, the Great Conspirator, works to corrupt the aspirations and ambitions of Mankind and xenos alike, and to leverage these hopes and dreams for his own nefarious ends.

Upon learning of the failure of the Rubric, Magnus banished Ahriman. This was the first of many schisms that split the Thousand Sons, divisions that eventually caused estrangement from their own Primarch. As a result of internal strife, the Thousand Sons effectively no longer function as a true Legion. Instead, they fight as isolated warbands and individual warriors. Some serve Tzeentch devoutly, others begrudgingly, and others as mindless conduits for the devastating sorcerous power of the Warp.

The air fills with kaleidoscopic bursts of magical energy as the convocations of the Great Conspirator materialise for battle. To mortal eyes, the different daemonic legions of Tzeentch are impossible to distinguish, each one as bizarre as the next, yet there is method within the madness -- although none save the Architect of Fate himself could truly comprehend it.

With an OverDrive account, you can save your favorite libraries for at-a-glance information about availability. Find out more about OverDrive accounts.

Designated in October 2013 by Black SFF writers Balogun Ojetade and Milton J. Davis, Black Speculative Fiction Month is dedicated to celebrating Black speculative fiction creators in literature, film, and more. While reading Black speculative fiction has always been a thrilling experience, I’ve recently learned that creating it can help me imagine my most magical self.

In late September, I finished “Moon Bloom” my very first fantasy short story with Black queer characters. The story was inspired by many things, but the most important factor was the desire to give myself the representation I’ve wanted to see for years.

Since grade school, I’ve adored fantasy fiction and how the stories paint the imagination with magic, adventure, and wonder. I grew up with the Harry Potter series, which served as an entry point for other fantasy books like Tamora Pierce”s Tortall series and Garth Nix’s Abhorsen trilogy. However, I didn’t read any books by or featuring Black people until 2010.

A collection of interviews from some of the leading and up-and-coming names in genre fiction, including Eduardo Sanchez, William Nolan, Raymond Benson, Jack Ketcham, Raymond Feist, Joe Schrieber, Kevin J. Anderson, and Roger Price.

In this second volume to Scribes of Speculative Fiction: A Collection of Interviews, author Cristopher DeRose’s interviews provide insights into the minds of today’s best authors and an eclectic mix of penetrating insights into their unique worlds. If you’re a fan of James Bond, Rift War, The Blair Witch Project, Star Wars, Logan’s Run, X-Files, Dune, or The Tomorrow People, you’ll discover the unforgettably diverse blend of talents behind these works that thrilled an entire generation and still stimulate the imaginations of new readers.

About the author: father, photographer, musician, writer and martial artist, Cristopher DeRose has published more than a hundred articles in magazines, such as Filmax and Cemetery Dance. He was a Staff Writer for the Sci-Fi Channel for several years. He worked as Editor for Dark Matter Magazine: A Chronicle of the Speculative Mind for its three-year run. His nonfiction books include Cobra on My Left, Leopard on My Right; and Scribes of Speculative Fiction Vol. I and Scribes of Speculative Fiction Vol. II. His fiction books include To Cast a Violent Shadow and 2020 Eternal. He lives in Los Angeles, California.

With an OverDrive account, you can save your favorite libraries for at-a-glance information about availability. Find out more about OverDrive accounts.

With an OverDrive account, you can save your favorite libraries for at-a-glance information about availability. Find out more about OverDrive accounts.

Designated in October 2013 by Black SFF writers Balogun Ojetade and Milton J. Davis, Black Speculative Fiction Month is dedicated to celebrating Black speculative fiction creators in literature, film, and more. While reading Black speculative fiction has always been a thrilling experience, I’ve recently learned that creating it can help me imagine my most magical self.

In late September, I finished “Moon Bloom” my very first fantasy short story with Black queer characters. The story was inspired by many things, but the most important factor was the desire to give myself the representation I’ve wanted to see for years.

Since grade school, I’ve adored fantasy fiction and how the stories paint the imagination with magic, adventure, and wonder. I grew up with the Harry Potter series, which served as an entry point for other fantasy books like Tamora Pierce”s Tortall series and Garth Nix’s Abhorsen trilogy. However, I didn’t read any books by or featuring Black people until 2010.


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