WEFOUNDBubba Ho-Tep


The cult classic movie starring Bruce Campbell , Bubba Ho-Tep , may never get that proposed sequel, but it is getting a prequel… in comic book form! Revealed in an EXCLUSIVE at THR , creator Jon R. Lansdale , who wrote the novella upon which the movie was based, is returning to co-write a prequel comic, Bubba Ho-Tep and the Cosmic Bloodsuckers , along with Joshua Jabcuga and artist Todd Galusha .  Baldemar Rivas provides the cover for the first issue.

In the new comic, President Richard Nixon (basically a pussycat when compared to the Trump era) calls on Elvis Presley to fend off an alien invasion. If the comic is successful, Lansdale intimates that there could be more Bubba Ho-Tep comics in the future.

“ Bubba Ho-Tep  was an accidental story that turned out to be my first film adaptation, and it’s still going strong in story and film,” Lansdale said on THR. “And finally, it has inspired a background story that was first a novel, and is now represented in the medium that first made me want to be a writer: Comics. Graphic novels. What we used to call Funny Books. I’m excited and looking forward to readers discovering it all in color and looking fine.”

Elvis and JFK, both alive and in nursing homes, fight for the souls of their fellow residents as they battle an ancient Egyptian Mummy.

Director: Don Coscarelli
Writers: Joe R. Lansdale (short story), Don Coscarelli (screenplay)
Stars: Bruce Campbell, Ossie Davis, Ella Joyce

Bubba Ho-Tep is a 1994 alternate history novella by American author Joe R. Lansdale . It was first published on August 1, 1994 in the Elvis Presley themed anthology The King is Dead and has since been re-published in various formats. [1] A film adaptation by the same name was released in 2002 and starred Bruce Campbell as the lead character of Elvis.

In this story, the real Elvis Presley switched places years ago with an Elvis impersonator . Tired of the life of drugs, women, and people who wanted nothing more than his money, he settles in to live a life of obscurity in a East Texas trailer park , where he becomes the best Elvis impersonator ever. Then his health begins to fail, and he falls from a stage and breaks his hip. His trailer burns down and with it all evidence he was the real Elvis Presley. He ends up in a shabby retirement home , which is where the story starts.

Late at night, Elvis hears scuttling noises and other creepy sounds in the otherwise quiet Mud Creek Shady Grove Convalescence Home. He befriends a black man, who's convinced he's John F. Kennedy , and the two begin to piece together that an Egyptian mummy is stalking the halls and sucking up souls in the night. Together the two men confront the monster, as no one will believe them.

Elvis and JFK did not die, and today they're roommates in an East Texas nursing home whose residents are being killed by an ancient Egyptian Soul Sucker named Bubba Ho-Tep. I want to get that on the table right at the get-go, so I can deal with the delightful wackiness of this movie, which is endearing and vulgar in about the right proportion. The movie doesn't exactly work, but sometimes when a car won't start, it's still fun to look at the little honey gleaming in the driveway.

The movie's back story: Elvis ( Bruce Campbell ) became sick of his lifestyle, his buddies, his groupies, his pills, his songs, his movies and his Colonel Parker. He struck a deal with an Elvis impersonator to trade places. There's even a contract guaranteeing that Elvis can switch back if he changes his mind -- but the contract is burned up in a barbecuing accident, and by then Elvis doesn't mind anyway, because he enjoys the freedom of performing just for the sheer joy, without the sideshow of fame.

The King explains all of this in a thoughtful, introspective voice-over narration that also deals with other matters on his mind, such as the alarming pustule on that part of his anatomy where it is least welcome. He talks about Priscilla and Lisa Marie , about his movies (not a single good one), about his decision to disappear, and about how he broke his hip falling off a stage. This narration is not broad comedy, but wicked, observant and truthful. "Bubba Ho-Tep" has a lot of affection for Elvis, takes him seriously, and -- this is crucial -- isn't a camp horror movie, but treats this loony situation as if it's really happening.

Back in October, Bubba Ho-Tep writer Joe R. Lansdale released  Bubba Ho-Tep and the Cosmic Blood-Suckers , a prequel to the novella that was turned into Phantasm director Don Coscarelli’s 2002 film. Now, the prequel is becoming a comic book!

Via THR today, Elvis will battle aliens in IDW Publishing’s  Bubba Ho-Tep and the Cosmic Blood-Suckers , co-written by Lansdale and Joshua Jabcuga.

“President Richard Nixon has uncovered a potential threat from beyond the stars, but there’s only one man who could possibly safeguard the world as we know it: Elvis Aaron Presley.”

Bubba Ho-Tep is a 1994 alternate history novella by American author Joe R. Lansdale . It was first published on August 1, 1994 in the Elvis Presley themed anthology The King is Dead and has since been re-published in various formats. [1] A film adaptation by the same name was released in 2002 and starred Bruce Campbell as the lead character of Elvis.

In this story, the real Elvis Presley switched places years ago with an Elvis impersonator . Tired of the life of drugs, women, and people who wanted nothing more than his money, he settles in to live a life of obscurity in a East Texas trailer park , where he becomes the best Elvis impersonator ever. Then his health begins to fail, and he falls from a stage and breaks his hip. His trailer burns down and with it all evidence he was the real Elvis Presley. He ends up in a shabby retirement home , which is where the story starts.

Late at night, Elvis hears scuttling noises and other creepy sounds in the otherwise quiet Mud Creek Shady Grove Convalescence Home. He befriends a black man, who's convinced he's John F. Kennedy , and the two begin to piece together that an Egyptian mummy is stalking the halls and sucking up souls in the night. Together the two men confront the monster, as no one will believe them.

The cult classic movie starring Bruce Campbell , Bubba Ho-Tep , may never get that proposed sequel, but it is getting a prequel… in comic book form! Revealed in an EXCLUSIVE at THR , creator Jon R. Lansdale , who wrote the novella upon which the movie was based, is returning to co-write a prequel comic, Bubba Ho-Tep and the Cosmic Bloodsuckers , along with Joshua Jabcuga and artist Todd Galusha .  Baldemar Rivas provides the cover for the first issue.

In the new comic, President Richard Nixon (basically a pussycat when compared to the Trump era) calls on Elvis Presley to fend off an alien invasion. If the comic is successful, Lansdale intimates that there could be more Bubba Ho-Tep comics in the future.

“ Bubba Ho-Tep  was an accidental story that turned out to be my first film adaptation, and it’s still going strong in story and film,” Lansdale said on THR. “And finally, it has inspired a background story that was first a novel, and is now represented in the medium that first made me want to be a writer: Comics. Graphic novels. What we used to call Funny Books. I’m excited and looking forward to readers discovering it all in color and looking fine.”

Elvis and JFK, both alive and in nursing homes, fight for the souls of their fellow residents as they battle an ancient Egyptian Mummy.

Director: Don Coscarelli
Writers: Joe R. Lansdale (short story), Don Coscarelli (screenplay)
Stars: Bruce Campbell, Ossie Davis, Ella Joyce

Bubba Ho-Tep is a 1994 alternate history novella by American author Joe R. Lansdale . It was first published on August 1, 1994 in the Elvis Presley themed anthology The King is Dead and has since been re-published in various formats. [1] A film adaptation by the same name was released in 2002 and starred Bruce Campbell as the lead character of Elvis.

In this story, the real Elvis Presley switched places years ago with an Elvis impersonator . Tired of the life of drugs, women, and people who wanted nothing more than his money, he settles in to live a life of obscurity in a East Texas trailer park , where he becomes the best Elvis impersonator ever. Then his health begins to fail, and he falls from a stage and breaks his hip. His trailer burns down and with it all evidence he was the real Elvis Presley. He ends up in a shabby retirement home , which is where the story starts.

Late at night, Elvis hears scuttling noises and other creepy sounds in the otherwise quiet Mud Creek Shady Grove Convalescence Home. He befriends a black man, who's convinced he's John F. Kennedy , and the two begin to piece together that an Egyptian mummy is stalking the halls and sucking up souls in the night. Together the two men confront the monster, as no one will believe them.

Elvis and JFK did not die, and today they're roommates in an East Texas nursing home whose residents are being killed by an ancient Egyptian Soul Sucker named Bubba Ho-Tep. I want to get that on the table right at the get-go, so I can deal with the delightful wackiness of this movie, which is endearing and vulgar in about the right proportion. The movie doesn't exactly work, but sometimes when a car won't start, it's still fun to look at the little honey gleaming in the driveway.

The movie's back story: Elvis ( Bruce Campbell ) became sick of his lifestyle, his buddies, his groupies, his pills, his songs, his movies and his Colonel Parker. He struck a deal with an Elvis impersonator to trade places. There's even a contract guaranteeing that Elvis can switch back if he changes his mind -- but the contract is burned up in a barbecuing accident, and by then Elvis doesn't mind anyway, because he enjoys the freedom of performing just for the sheer joy, without the sideshow of fame.

The King explains all of this in a thoughtful, introspective voice-over narration that also deals with other matters on his mind, such as the alarming pustule on that part of his anatomy where it is least welcome. He talks about Priscilla and Lisa Marie , about his movies (not a single good one), about his decision to disappear, and about how he broke his hip falling off a stage. This narration is not broad comedy, but wicked, observant and truthful. "Bubba Ho-Tep" has a lot of affection for Elvis, takes him seriously, and -- this is crucial -- isn't a camp horror movie, but treats this loony situation as if it's really happening.

The cult classic movie starring Bruce Campbell , Bubba Ho-Tep , may never get that proposed sequel, but it is getting a prequel… in comic book form! Revealed in an EXCLUSIVE at THR , creator Jon R. Lansdale , who wrote the novella upon which the movie was based, is returning to co-write a prequel comic, Bubba Ho-Tep and the Cosmic Bloodsuckers , along with Joshua Jabcuga and artist Todd Galusha .  Baldemar Rivas provides the cover for the first issue.

In the new comic, President Richard Nixon (basically a pussycat when compared to the Trump era) calls on Elvis Presley to fend off an alien invasion. If the comic is successful, Lansdale intimates that there could be more Bubba Ho-Tep comics in the future.

“ Bubba Ho-Tep  was an accidental story that turned out to be my first film adaptation, and it’s still going strong in story and film,” Lansdale said on THR. “And finally, it has inspired a background story that was first a novel, and is now represented in the medium that first made me want to be a writer: Comics. Graphic novels. What we used to call Funny Books. I’m excited and looking forward to readers discovering it all in color and looking fine.”

Elvis and JFK, both alive and in nursing homes, fight for the souls of their fellow residents as they battle an ancient Egyptian Mummy.

Director: Don Coscarelli
Writers: Joe R. Lansdale (short story), Don Coscarelli (screenplay)
Stars: Bruce Campbell, Ossie Davis, Ella Joyce

Bubba Ho-Tep is a 1994 alternate history novella by American author Joe R. Lansdale . It was first published on August 1, 1994 in the Elvis Presley themed anthology The King is Dead and has since been re-published in various formats. [1] A film adaptation by the same name was released in 2002 and starred Bruce Campbell as the lead character of Elvis.

In this story, the real Elvis Presley switched places years ago with an Elvis impersonator . Tired of the life of drugs, women, and people who wanted nothing more than his money, he settles in to live a life of obscurity in a East Texas trailer park , where he becomes the best Elvis impersonator ever. Then his health begins to fail, and he falls from a stage and breaks his hip. His trailer burns down and with it all evidence he was the real Elvis Presley. He ends up in a shabby retirement home , which is where the story starts.

Late at night, Elvis hears scuttling noises and other creepy sounds in the otherwise quiet Mud Creek Shady Grove Convalescence Home. He befriends a black man, who's convinced he's John F. Kennedy , and the two begin to piece together that an Egyptian mummy is stalking the halls and sucking up souls in the night. Together the two men confront the monster, as no one will believe them.

The cult classic movie starring Bruce Campbell , Bubba Ho-Tep , may never get that proposed sequel, but it is getting a prequel… in comic book form! Revealed in an EXCLUSIVE at THR , creator Jon R. Lansdale , who wrote the novella upon which the movie was based, is returning to co-write a prequel comic, Bubba Ho-Tep and the Cosmic Bloodsuckers , along with Joshua Jabcuga and artist Todd Galusha .  Baldemar Rivas provides the cover for the first issue.

In the new comic, President Richard Nixon (basically a pussycat when compared to the Trump era) calls on Elvis Presley to fend off an alien invasion. If the comic is successful, Lansdale intimates that there could be more Bubba Ho-Tep comics in the future.

“ Bubba Ho-Tep  was an accidental story that turned out to be my first film adaptation, and it’s still going strong in story and film,” Lansdale said on THR. “And finally, it has inspired a background story that was first a novel, and is now represented in the medium that first made me want to be a writer: Comics. Graphic novels. What we used to call Funny Books. I’m excited and looking forward to readers discovering it all in color and looking fine.”

Elvis and JFK, both alive and in nursing homes, fight for the souls of their fellow residents as they battle an ancient Egyptian Mummy.

Director: Don Coscarelli
Writers: Joe R. Lansdale (short story), Don Coscarelli (screenplay)
Stars: Bruce Campbell, Ossie Davis, Ella Joyce

Bubba Ho-Tep is a 1994 alternate history novella by American author Joe R. Lansdale . It was first published on August 1, 1994 in the Elvis Presley themed anthology The King is Dead and has since been re-published in various formats. [1] A film adaptation by the same name was released in 2002 and starred Bruce Campbell as the lead character of Elvis.

In this story, the real Elvis Presley switched places years ago with an Elvis impersonator . Tired of the life of drugs, women, and people who wanted nothing more than his money, he settles in to live a life of obscurity in a East Texas trailer park , where he becomes the best Elvis impersonator ever. Then his health begins to fail, and he falls from a stage and breaks his hip. His trailer burns down and with it all evidence he was the real Elvis Presley. He ends up in a shabby retirement home , which is where the story starts.

Late at night, Elvis hears scuttling noises and other creepy sounds in the otherwise quiet Mud Creek Shady Grove Convalescence Home. He befriends a black man, who's convinced he's John F. Kennedy , and the two begin to piece together that an Egyptian mummy is stalking the halls and sucking up souls in the night. Together the two men confront the monster, as no one will believe them.

Elvis and JFK did not die, and today they're roommates in an East Texas nursing home whose residents are being killed by an ancient Egyptian Soul Sucker named Bubba Ho-Tep. I want to get that on the table right at the get-go, so I can deal with the delightful wackiness of this movie, which is endearing and vulgar in about the right proportion. The movie doesn't exactly work, but sometimes when a car won't start, it's still fun to look at the little honey gleaming in the driveway.

The movie's back story: Elvis ( Bruce Campbell ) became sick of his lifestyle, his buddies, his groupies, his pills, his songs, his movies and his Colonel Parker. He struck a deal with an Elvis impersonator to trade places. There's even a contract guaranteeing that Elvis can switch back if he changes his mind -- but the contract is burned up in a barbecuing accident, and by then Elvis doesn't mind anyway, because he enjoys the freedom of performing just for the sheer joy, without the sideshow of fame.

The King explains all of this in a thoughtful, introspective voice-over narration that also deals with other matters on his mind, such as the alarming pustule on that part of his anatomy where it is least welcome. He talks about Priscilla and Lisa Marie , about his movies (not a single good one), about his decision to disappear, and about how he broke his hip falling off a stage. This narration is not broad comedy, but wicked, observant and truthful. "Bubba Ho-Tep" has a lot of affection for Elvis, takes him seriously, and -- this is crucial -- isn't a camp horror movie, but treats this loony situation as if it's really happening.

Back in October, Bubba Ho-Tep writer Joe R. Lansdale released  Bubba Ho-Tep and the Cosmic Blood-Suckers , a prequel to the novella that was turned into Phantasm director Don Coscarelli’s 2002 film. Now, the prequel is becoming a comic book!

Via THR today, Elvis will battle aliens in IDW Publishing’s  Bubba Ho-Tep and the Cosmic Blood-Suckers , co-written by Lansdale and Joshua Jabcuga.

“President Richard Nixon has uncovered a potential threat from beyond the stars, but there’s only one man who could possibly safeguard the world as we know it: Elvis Aaron Presley.”

The cult classic movie starring Bruce Campbell , Bubba Ho-Tep , may never get that proposed sequel, but it is getting a prequel… in comic book form! Revealed in an EXCLUSIVE at THR , creator Jon R. Lansdale , who wrote the novella upon which the movie was based, is returning to co-write a prequel comic, Bubba Ho-Tep and the Cosmic Bloodsuckers , along with Joshua Jabcuga and artist Todd Galusha .  Baldemar Rivas provides the cover for the first issue.

In the new comic, President Richard Nixon (basically a pussycat when compared to the Trump era) calls on Elvis Presley to fend off an alien invasion. If the comic is successful, Lansdale intimates that there could be more Bubba Ho-Tep comics in the future.

“ Bubba Ho-Tep  was an accidental story that turned out to be my first film adaptation, and it’s still going strong in story and film,” Lansdale said on THR. “And finally, it has inspired a background story that was first a novel, and is now represented in the medium that first made me want to be a writer: Comics. Graphic novels. What we used to call Funny Books. I’m excited and looking forward to readers discovering it all in color and looking fine.”

The cult classic movie starring Bruce Campbell , Bubba Ho-Tep , may never get that proposed sequel, but it is getting a prequel… in comic book form! Revealed in an EXCLUSIVE at THR , creator Jon R. Lansdale , who wrote the novella upon which the movie was based, is returning to co-write a prequel comic, Bubba Ho-Tep and the Cosmic Bloodsuckers , along with Joshua Jabcuga and artist Todd Galusha .  Baldemar Rivas provides the cover for the first issue.

In the new comic, President Richard Nixon (basically a pussycat when compared to the Trump era) calls on Elvis Presley to fend off an alien invasion. If the comic is successful, Lansdale intimates that there could be more Bubba Ho-Tep comics in the future.

“ Bubba Ho-Tep  was an accidental story that turned out to be my first film adaptation, and it’s still going strong in story and film,” Lansdale said on THR. “And finally, it has inspired a background story that was first a novel, and is now represented in the medium that first made me want to be a writer: Comics. Graphic novels. What we used to call Funny Books. I’m excited and looking forward to readers discovering it all in color and looking fine.”

Elvis and JFK, both alive and in nursing homes, fight for the souls of their fellow residents as they battle an ancient Egyptian Mummy.

Director: Don Coscarelli
Writers: Joe R. Lansdale (short story), Don Coscarelli (screenplay)
Stars: Bruce Campbell, Ossie Davis, Ella Joyce


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