WEFOUNDOcd Treatment Manual


Twohig, M.P., Hayes, S.C., Plumb, J.C., Pruitt, L.D., Collins, A.B., Hazlett-Stevens, H., & Woidneck, M.R. (2010) . A randomized clinical trial of acceptance and commitment therapy vs progressive relaxation training in the treatment of obsessive compulsive disorder. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology,  78,  705-716.

Twohig, M. P., Hayes, S. C., & Masuda, A. (2006). Increasing willingness to experience obsessions: Acceptance and Commitment Therapy as a treatment for obsessive compulsive disorder. Behavior Therapy, 37 (1), 3-13.

For further information contact: Mike Twohig ([email protected]), Assistant Professor, Utah State University, Department of Psychology, 2810 Old Main Hill, Logan, Utah 84322-2810, www.twohig.usu.edu.

There are no known studies as to the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy to ROCD symptoms. Our clinical experience shows, however, that high doses of SSRI’s as accepted in the treatment of OCD (e.g., Montgomery et al., 2001) may lead to a reduction of ROCD symptoms for some individuals.

Psycho-education sets the tone for the rest of therapy. The psycho-education component should cover the cognitive model of OCD and ROCD (see Figure 1). It is important to provide the client with the rationale for the therapeutic process and discuss the course of therapy. The influence of ROCD symptoms on decision making should then be addressed and the difference between obsessive thinking and problem solving clarified. In this context, the impact of ROCD symptoms on one’s ability to experience feelings should be explored. Based on these understandings, it is best to reach an agreement to postpone decisions regarding the relationship until ROCD symptoms are significantly reduced.

Contingent on the client’s approval, one should consider involving the partner in the therapeutic process. In such cases, partnerā€™s symptom accommodation should be assessed, ROCD psycho-education provided, and strategies for reducing dyadic influences suggested.

Twohig, M.P., Hayes, S.C., Plumb, J.C., Pruitt, L.D., Collins, A.B., Hazlett-Stevens, H., & Woidneck, M.R. (2010) . A randomized clinical trial of acceptance and commitment therapy vs progressive relaxation training in the treatment of obsessive compulsive disorder. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology,  78,  705-716.

Twohig, M. P., Hayes, S. C., & Masuda, A. (2006). Increasing willingness to experience obsessions: Acceptance and Commitment Therapy as a treatment for obsessive compulsive disorder. Behavior Therapy, 37 (1), 3-13.

For further information contact: Mike Twohig ([email protected]), Assistant Professor, Utah State University, Department of Psychology, 2810 Old Main Hill, Logan, Utah 84322-2810, www.twohig.usu.edu.


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