WEFOUNDTreasure Island (Illustrated Classics)


Jim Hawkins , a young boy living alone with his mother in England in their inn, called the Admiral Benbow, is looking after the inn alone, when a strange man by the name of Black Dog comes and orders a glass of rum from him, at the same time asking Jim if he has seen a "Captain William Bones". Jim answers that he has never seen a Billy Bones, and gets Black Dog another glass of rum. However, Black Dog looks into the back of the inn and sees an old sea chest with the initials "W.B." inscribed on the side, and takes off. Once he is gone, a man appears in a doorway at the top of the stairs, asking Jim if it was "a one legged man."

Some unspecified time later, Silver, Jim, and Silver's former crew mates arrive on the Hispaniola to prepare for the voyage. Captain Smollett addresses the new crew with the rules and tells the first mate, Mr. Arrow, to take down all their names. Captain Smollett then goes to his cabin to speak with Livesey and Trelawney, stating how displeased he is with the fact that this whole voyage is a treasure hunt. Trelawney swears that he never breathed a word about the treasure, but Livesey asks the captain if he is worried about a mutiny, to which he answers no. He then toasts the voyage with the two, and when he leaves, Trelawney dubs his conduct, "Downright un-English!"

Silver turns back to shout back to Jim, bidding him goodbye and wishing him good luck. Livesey curses Silver, and at the same time, wishes him the best of luck, while Jim, who realizes that Silver was his friend all along, raises his hand and waves goodbye to him. The film then closes with Long John Silver sailing off into the horizon with the treasure.

Jim Hawkins , a young boy living alone with his mother in England in their inn, called the Admiral Benbow, is looking after the inn alone, when a strange man by the name of Black Dog comes and orders a glass of rum from him, at the same time asking Jim if he has seen a "Captain William Bones". Jim answers that he has never seen a Billy Bones, and gets Black Dog another glass of rum. However, Black Dog looks into the back of the inn and sees an old sea chest with the initials "W.B." inscribed on the side, and takes off. Once he is gone, a man appears in a doorway at the top of the stairs, asking Jim if it was "a one legged man."

Some unspecified time later, Silver, Jim, and Silver's former crew mates arrive on the Hispaniola to prepare for the voyage. Captain Smollett addresses the new crew with the rules and tells the first mate, Mr. Arrow, to take down all their names. Captain Smollett then goes to his cabin to speak with Livesey and Trelawney, stating how displeased he is with the fact that this whole voyage is a treasure hunt. Trelawney swears that he never breathed a word about the treasure, but Livesey asks the captain if he is worried about a mutiny, to which he answers no. He then toasts the voyage with the two, and when he leaves, Trelawney dubs his conduct, "Downright un-English!"

Silver turns back to shout back to Jim, bidding him goodbye and wishing him good luck. Livesey curses Silver, and at the same time, wishes him the best of luck, while Jim, who realizes that Silver was his friend all along, raises his hand and waves goodbye to him. The film then closes with Long John Silver sailing off into the horizon with the treasure.

CliffsNotes study guides are written by real teachers and professors, so no matter what you're studying, CliffsNotes can ease your homework headaches and help you score high on exams.

IT was not very long after this that there occurred the first of the mysterious events that rid us at last of the captain, though not, as you will see, of his affairs. It was a bitter cold winter, with long, hard frosts and heavy gales; and it was plain from the first that my poor father was little likely to see the spring. He sank daily, and my mother and I had all the inn upon our hands, and were kept busy enough without paying much regard to our unpleasant guest.

It was one January morning, very early—a pinching, frosty morning—the cove all grey with hoar-frost, the ripple lapping softly on the stones, the sun still low and only touching the hilltops and shining far to seaward. The captain had risen earlier than usual and set out down the beach, his cutlass swinging under the broad skirts of the old blue coat, his brass telescope under his arm, his hat tilted back upon his head. I remember his breath hanging like smoke in his wake as he strode off, and the last sound I heard of him as he turned the big rock was a loud snort of indignation, as though his mind was still running upon Dr. Livesey.

Well, mother was upstairs with father and I was laying the breakfast-table against the captain’s return when the parlour door opened and a man stepped in on whom I had never set my eyes before. He was a pale, tallowy creature, wanting two fingers of the left hand, and though he wore a cutlass, he did not look much like a fighter. I had always my eye open for seafaring men, with one leg or two, and I remember this one puzzled me. He was not sailorly, and yet he had a smack of the sea about him too …

The story opens at Jim’s father’s inn, the Admiral Benbow . A wild seaman, Billy Bones, comes to stay, bringing with him a large sea chest. He frightens the locals by getting raucously drunk and singing the sea chanty:

Bones asks Jim to keep an eye out for “the seafaring man with one leg” (p. 11), who Bones fears above all else. One day, the pirate Black Dog comes to the inn and fights with Bones. Wounded, Black Dog retreats and Bones collapses. Bones confesses to Jim that he was first mate for the infamous Captain Flint, and that he knows where Flint’s treasure is buried. He also knows that Black Dog, another of Flint’s men, will bring the rest of the crew to find him so that they can seek the treasure for themselves.

Meanwhile, Jim’s ailing father dies. While the house is in mourning, a frightening and evil pirate Blind Pew, delivers the Black Spot to Bones. The Black Spot, a summons which tells Bones he has until 10PM to tell the pirates where the treasure is, shocks Bones so badly that he dies of apoplexy.

Jim Hawkins , a young boy living alone with his mother in England in their inn, called the Admiral Benbow, is looking after the inn alone, when a strange man by the name of Black Dog comes and orders a glass of rum from him, at the same time asking Jim if he has seen a "Captain William Bones". Jim answers that he has never seen a Billy Bones, and gets Black Dog another glass of rum. However, Black Dog looks into the back of the inn and sees an old sea chest with the initials "W.B." inscribed on the side, and takes off. Once he is gone, a man appears in a doorway at the top of the stairs, asking Jim if it was "a one legged man."

Some unspecified time later, Silver, Jim, and Silver's former crew mates arrive on the Hispaniola to prepare for the voyage. Captain Smollett addresses the new crew with the rules and tells the first mate, Mr. Arrow, to take down all their names. Captain Smollett then goes to his cabin to speak with Livesey and Trelawney, stating how displeased he is with the fact that this whole voyage is a treasure hunt. Trelawney swears that he never breathed a word about the treasure, but Livesey asks the captain if he is worried about a mutiny, to which he answers no. He then toasts the voyage with the two, and when he leaves, Trelawney dubs his conduct, "Downright un-English!"

Silver turns back to shout back to Jim, bidding him goodbye and wishing him good luck. Livesey curses Silver, and at the same time, wishes him the best of luck, while Jim, who realizes that Silver was his friend all along, raises his hand and waves goodbye to him. The film then closes with Long John Silver sailing off into the horizon with the treasure.

CliffsNotes study guides are written by real teachers and professors, so no matter what you're studying, CliffsNotes can ease your homework headaches and help you score high on exams.

Jim Hawkins , a young boy living alone with his mother in England in their inn, called the Admiral Benbow, is looking after the inn alone, when a strange man by the name of Black Dog comes and orders a glass of rum from him, at the same time asking Jim if he has seen a "Captain William Bones". Jim answers that he has never seen a Billy Bones, and gets Black Dog another glass of rum. However, Black Dog looks into the back of the inn and sees an old sea chest with the initials "W.B." inscribed on the side, and takes off. Once he is gone, a man appears in a doorway at the top of the stairs, asking Jim if it was "a one legged man."

Some unspecified time later, Silver, Jim, and Silver's former crew mates arrive on the Hispaniola to prepare for the voyage. Captain Smollett addresses the new crew with the rules and tells the first mate, Mr. Arrow, to take down all their names. Captain Smollett then goes to his cabin to speak with Livesey and Trelawney, stating how displeased he is with the fact that this whole voyage is a treasure hunt. Trelawney swears that he never breathed a word about the treasure, but Livesey asks the captain if he is worried about a mutiny, to which he answers no. He then toasts the voyage with the two, and when he leaves, Trelawney dubs his conduct, "Downright un-English!"

Silver turns back to shout back to Jim, bidding him goodbye and wishing him good luck. Livesey curses Silver, and at the same time, wishes him the best of luck, while Jim, who realizes that Silver was his friend all along, raises his hand and waves goodbye to him. The film then closes with Long John Silver sailing off into the horizon with the treasure.

CliffsNotes study guides are written by real teachers and professors, so no matter what you're studying, CliffsNotes can ease your homework headaches and help you score high on exams.

IT was not very long after this that there occurred the first of the mysterious events that rid us at last of the captain, though not, as you will see, of his affairs. It was a bitter cold winter, with long, hard frosts and heavy gales; and it was plain from the first that my poor father was little likely to see the spring. He sank daily, and my mother and I had all the inn upon our hands, and were kept busy enough without paying much regard to our unpleasant guest.

It was one January morning, very early—a pinching, frosty morning—the cove all grey with hoar-frost, the ripple lapping softly on the stones, the sun still low and only touching the hilltops and shining far to seaward. The captain had risen earlier than usual and set out down the beach, his cutlass swinging under the broad skirts of the old blue coat, his brass telescope under his arm, his hat tilted back upon his head. I remember his breath hanging like smoke in his wake as he strode off, and the last sound I heard of him as he turned the big rock was a loud snort of indignation, as though his mind was still running upon Dr. Livesey.

Well, mother was upstairs with father and I was laying the breakfast-table against the captain’s return when the parlour door opened and a man stepped in on whom I had never set my eyes before. He was a pale, tallowy creature, wanting two fingers of the left hand, and though he wore a cutlass, he did not look much like a fighter. I had always my eye open for seafaring men, with one leg or two, and I remember this one puzzled me. He was not sailorly, and yet he had a smack of the sea about him too …