WEFOUNDThe Blue Room


President James Monroe moved back into the house in 1817 after its restoration and redecorated the "large oval room" in the French Empire style. Monroe ordered mahogany furniture from Pierre-Antoine Bellange predominantly for formal use in the oval and state dining rooms. The president's agents, the American firm of Russell and La Farge in LeHavre, France, however, shipped 53 pieces of carved and gilded furniture with crimson silk upholstery. They informed the president that "mahogany is not generally admitted in the furniture of a Saloon, even at private gentlemen's houses."

One of the results of Jacqueline Kennedy's historical research was the placement of French furniture, originally ordered by President Monroe in 1818, in the Blue Room. 

Red dominated the room's design when John Adams, the son of President John Quincy Adams, married Mary Catherine Hellen here on February 25, 1828. Andrew Jackson fitted the room out in green. Martin Van Buren redecorated the "elliptic saloon" and started the tradition of a "blue room" in 1837. In 1848, gas lighting was piped to all the chandeliers on the state floor except the Blue Room. Sarah Polk thought candles looked better in Monroe's luster, an elegant fixture that was reputed to have belonged to Napoleon. She was vindicated when on the first night that it was used, gas ran out and all went dark except the candlelit oval room.

The Tomatometer rating – based on the published opinions of hundreds of film and television critics – is a trusted measurement of movie and TV programming quality for millions of moviegoers. It represents the percentage of professional critic reviews that are positive for a given film or television show.

Movies and TV shows are Certified Fresh with a steady Tomatometer of 75% or higher after a set amount of reviews (80 for wide-release movies, 40 for limited-release movies, 20 for TV shows), including 5 reviews from Top Critics.

If anything, it's a backhanded testimony to the plodding effectiveness of detail-minded detective work and the slow grinding of the bureaucratic justice machine.

President James Monroe moved back into the house in 1817 after its restoration and redecorated the "large oval room" in the French Empire style. Monroe ordered mahogany furniture from Pierre-Antoine Bellange predominantly for formal use in the oval and state dining rooms. The president's agents, the American firm of Russell and La Farge in LeHavre, France, however, shipped 53 pieces of carved and gilded furniture with crimson silk upholstery. They informed the president that "mahogany is not generally admitted in the furniture of a Saloon, even at private gentlemen's houses."

One of the results of Jacqueline Kennedy's historical research was the placement of French furniture, originally ordered by President Monroe in 1818, in the Blue Room. 

Red dominated the room's design when John Adams, the son of President John Quincy Adams, married Mary Catherine Hellen here on February 25, 1828. Andrew Jackson fitted the room out in green. Martin Van Buren redecorated the "elliptic saloon" and started the tradition of a "blue room" in 1837. In 1848, gas lighting was piped to all the chandeliers on the state floor except the Blue Room. Sarah Polk thought candles looked better in Monroe's luster, an elegant fixture that was reputed to have belonged to Napoleon. She was vindicated when on the first night that it was used, gas ran out and all went dark except the candlelit oval room.

The Tomatometer rating – based on the published opinions of hundreds of film and television critics – is a trusted measurement of movie and TV programming quality for millions of moviegoers. It represents the percentage of professional critic reviews that are positive for a given film or television show.

Movies and TV shows are Certified Fresh with a steady Tomatometer of 75% or higher after a set amount of reviews (80 for wide-release movies, 40 for limited-release movies, 20 for TV shows), including 5 reviews from Top Critics.

If anything, it's a backhanded testimony to the plodding effectiveness of detail-minded detective work and the slow grinding of the bureaucratic justice machine.

Set on Sydney’s iconic Bondi Beach in the historic Bondi Surf Bathers’ Life Saving Club is The Blue Room Bondi. Commanding magnificent ocean views The Blue Room is the ultimate function venue in Sydney’s Eastern Suburbs. This stunning space is the perfect mix of relaxed beachside & elegance that will deliver an unforgettable experience from the moment you arrive.
Our Bondi Beach venue is a magnificent setting for events of all styles; from weddings receptions to cocktail party functions, corporate conference functions to engagement party celebrations.

The modern reinvention of this historic Bondi Beach surf clubs existing function space is brought to you by Grand Pacific Group of the acclaimed The Tea Room QVB, Gunners’ Barracks, Sergeants’ Mess & Dunbar House. Styled by esteemed interior designer, Sibella Court, the room is reflective of its dynamic location- beach blue hues and natural fibres, a roof encased with white lanterns, exposed wooden dining tables and endless festoon lighting.This ultimate function venue on Sydney’s Eastern Suburbs, The Blue Room Bondi opened its doors on October 3rd 2016.

" Myself and my friend had such a lovely time, your staff are exceptional. In particular two female staff that served us, I'm not sure of either of their names but one of the girls was French (if that narrows it down so you can pass this on). All staff were very knowledge on all products, they were polite, efficient and friendly. It contributed to both of us having such a wonderful afternoon. I will certainly recommend The Tea Room to friends. "

President James Monroe moved back into the house in 1817 after its restoration and redecorated the "large oval room" in the French Empire style. Monroe ordered mahogany furniture from Pierre-Antoine Bellange predominantly for formal use in the oval and state dining rooms. The president's agents, the American firm of Russell and La Farge in LeHavre, France, however, shipped 53 pieces of carved and gilded furniture with crimson silk upholstery. They informed the president that "mahogany is not generally admitted in the furniture of a Saloon, even at private gentlemen's houses."

One of the results of Jacqueline Kennedy's historical research was the placement of French furniture, originally ordered by President Monroe in 1818, in the Blue Room. 

Red dominated the room's design when John Adams, the son of President John Quincy Adams, married Mary Catherine Hellen here on February 25, 1828. Andrew Jackson fitted the room out in green. Martin Van Buren redecorated the "elliptic saloon" and started the tradition of a "blue room" in 1837. In 1848, gas lighting was piped to all the chandeliers on the state floor except the Blue Room. Sarah Polk thought candles looked better in Monroe's luster, an elegant fixture that was reputed to have belonged to Napoleon. She was vindicated when on the first night that it was used, gas ran out and all went dark except the candlelit oval room.

The Tomatometer rating – based on the published opinions of hundreds of film and television critics – is a trusted measurement of movie and TV programming quality for millions of moviegoers. It represents the percentage of professional critic reviews that are positive for a given film or television show.

Movies and TV shows are Certified Fresh with a steady Tomatometer of 75% or higher after a set amount of reviews (80 for wide-release movies, 40 for limited-release movies, 20 for TV shows), including 5 reviews from Top Critics.

If anything, it's a backhanded testimony to the plodding effectiveness of detail-minded detective work and the slow grinding of the bureaucratic justice machine.

Set on Sydney’s iconic Bondi Beach in the historic Bondi Surf Bathers’ Life Saving Club is The Blue Room Bondi. Commanding magnificent ocean views The Blue Room is the ultimate function venue in Sydney’s Eastern Suburbs. This stunning space is the perfect mix of relaxed beachside & elegance that will deliver an unforgettable experience from the moment you arrive.
Our Bondi Beach venue is a magnificent setting for events of all styles; from weddings receptions to cocktail party functions, corporate conference functions to engagement party celebrations.

The modern reinvention of this historic Bondi Beach surf clubs existing function space is brought to you by Grand Pacific Group of the acclaimed The Tea Room QVB, Gunners’ Barracks, Sergeants’ Mess & Dunbar House. Styled by esteemed interior designer, Sibella Court, the room is reflective of its dynamic location- beach blue hues and natural fibres, a roof encased with white lanterns, exposed wooden dining tables and endless festoon lighting.This ultimate function venue on Sydney’s Eastern Suburbs, The Blue Room Bondi opened its doors on October 3rd 2016.

" Myself and my friend had such a lovely time, your staff are exceptional. In particular two female staff that served us, I'm not sure of either of their names but one of the girls was French (if that narrows it down so you can pass this on). All staff were very knowledge on all products, they were polite, efficient and friendly. It contributed to both of us having such a wonderful afternoon. I will certainly recommend The Tea Room to friends. "

The Blue Room is one of three state parlors on the first floor in the White House , the residence of the President of the United States . It is distinct for its oval shape. The room is used for receptions and receiving lines and is occasionally set for small dinners. President Grover Cleveland married Frances Folsom in the room on June 2, 1886, the only wedding of a President and First Lady in the White House. [1] The room is traditionally decorated in shades of blue. With the Yellow Oval Room above it and the Diplomatic Reception Room below it, the Blue Room is one of three oval rooms in James Hoban 's original design for the White House.

The room is approximately 30 by 40 feet (9.1 by 12.2 m). It has six doors, which open into the Cross Hall , Green Room , Red Room , and South Portico. The three windows look out upon the South Lawn .

The design of the blue satin draperies is derived from early 19th-century French patterns. The present drapery design is similar to those installed during the administration of Richard Nixon. Clement Conger , White House Curator at that time, used archive materials from the Society for the Protection of New England Antiquities and the Metropolitan Museum of Art 's Department of Decorative Arts as patterns for the drapery.

President James Monroe moved back into the house in 1817 after its restoration and redecorated the "large oval room" in the French Empire style. Monroe ordered mahogany furniture from Pierre-Antoine Bellange predominantly for formal use in the oval and state dining rooms. The president's agents, the American firm of Russell and La Farge in LeHavre, France, however, shipped 53 pieces of carved and gilded furniture with crimson silk upholstery. They informed the president that "mahogany is not generally admitted in the furniture of a Saloon, even at private gentlemen's houses."

One of the results of Jacqueline Kennedy's historical research was the placement of French furniture, originally ordered by President Monroe in 1818, in the Blue Room. 

Red dominated the room's design when John Adams, the son of President John Quincy Adams, married Mary Catherine Hellen here on February 25, 1828. Andrew Jackson fitted the room out in green. Martin Van Buren redecorated the "elliptic saloon" and started the tradition of a "blue room" in 1837. In 1848, gas lighting was piped to all the chandeliers on the state floor except the Blue Room. Sarah Polk thought candles looked better in Monroe's luster, an elegant fixture that was reputed to have belonged to Napoleon. She was vindicated when on the first night that it was used, gas ran out and all went dark except the candlelit oval room.


C1gib+sBckS.png