WEFOUNDThe Power of SHAZAM! (1995 series) #37 SIGNED


Written and illustrated by Jerry Ordway, The Power of Shazam was DC’s attempt at a Captain Marvel relaunch in the early ’90s. A Shazam series in the late ’80s failed to reinvent the character and the final purchase of all of Fawcett’s assets allowed a relaunch closer to the original Fawcett Comics origins.

I love Captain Marvel (aka Shazam) and remember watching the show when I was little. First apppearing in Whiz Comics #2 (February 1940), the character didn’t ever reach his early popularity even when acquired by DC in the ’70s. Here, Ordway manages to pull together both the past and modernize it in a way that makes The Power of Shazam a great looking book and a fun read.

I really enjoy the modernized Captain Marvel story. Ordway tightened the story by bringing together a lot of the aspects of the original comics into one concise story that still leaves plenty of room for exploration. Captain Marvel was always very cartoony but the dream of kids who read comic books. He was a kid, treated as an adult, and who got to play in the big leagues with other heroes like Superman and Batman…and Ordway captures this perfectly.

Captain Marvel , also known as Shazam ( / ʃ ə ˈ z æ m / ), is a fictional superhero appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics . Artist C. C. Beck and writer Bill Parker created the character in 1939. Captain Marvel first appeared in Whiz Comics #2 ( cover-dated Feb. 1940), published by Fawcett Comics . He is the alter ego of Billy Batson , a boy who, by speaking the magic word " SHAZAM " (acronym of six "immortal elders": S olomon , H ercules , A tlas , Z eus , A chilles and M ercury ), can transform himself into a costumed adult with the powers of superhuman strength, speed, flight and other abilities.

Based on book sales, the character was the most popular superhero of the 1940s, outselling even Superman . [1] [2] Fawcett expanded the franchise to include other "Marvels", primarily Marvel Family associates Mary Marvel and Captain Marvel Jr. , who can harness Billy's powers as well. Captain Marvel was also the first comic book superhero to be adapted into film, in a 1941 Republic Pictures serial titled Adventures of Captain Marvel .

After the success of National Comics ' new superhero characters Superman and Batman , Fawcett Publications started its own comics division in 1939, recruiting writer Bill Parker to create several hero characters for the first title in their line, tentatively titled Flash Comics . Besides penning stories featuring Ibis the Invincible , Spy Smasher , Golden Arrow , Lance O'Casey , Scoop Smith , and Dan Dare for the new book, Parker also wrote a story about a team of six superheroes, each possessing a special power granted to them by a mythological figure. [10]

Written and illustrated by Jerry Ordway, The Power of Shazam was DC’s attempt at a Captain Marvel relaunch in the early ’90s. A Shazam series in the late ’80s failed to reinvent the character and the final purchase of all of Fawcett’s assets allowed a relaunch closer to the original Fawcett Comics origins.

I love Captain Marvel (aka Shazam) and remember watching the show when I was little. First apppearing in Whiz Comics #2 (February 1940), the character didn’t ever reach his early popularity even when acquired by DC in the ’70s. Here, Ordway manages to pull together both the past and modernize it in a way that makes The Power of Shazam a great looking book and a fun read.

I really enjoy the modernized Captain Marvel story. Ordway tightened the story by bringing together a lot of the aspects of the original comics into one concise story that still leaves plenty of room for exploration. Captain Marvel was always very cartoony but the dream of kids who read comic books. He was a kid, treated as an adult, and who got to play in the big leagues with other heroes like Superman and Batman…and Ordway captures this perfectly.

Captain Marvel , also known as Shazam ( / ʃ ə ˈ z æ m / ), is a fictional superhero appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics . Artist C. C. Beck and writer Bill Parker created the character in 1939. Captain Marvel first appeared in Whiz Comics #2 ( cover-dated Feb. 1940), published by Fawcett Comics . He is the alter ego of Billy Batson , a boy who, by speaking the magic word " SHAZAM " (acronym of six "immortal elders": S olomon , H ercules , A tlas , Z eus , A chilles and M ercury ), can transform himself into a costumed adult with the powers of superhuman strength, speed, flight and other abilities.

Based on book sales, the character was the most popular superhero of the 1940s, outselling even Superman . [1] [2] Fawcett expanded the franchise to include other "Marvels", primarily Marvel Family associates Mary Marvel and Captain Marvel Jr. , who can harness Billy's powers as well. Captain Marvel was also the first comic book superhero to be adapted into film, in a 1941 Republic Pictures serial titled Adventures of Captain Marvel .

After the success of National Comics ' new superhero characters Superman and Batman , Fawcett Publications started its own comics division in 1939, recruiting writer Bill Parker to create several hero characters for the first title in their line, tentatively titled Flash Comics . Besides penning stories featuring Ibis the Invincible , Spy Smasher , Golden Arrow , Lance O'Casey , Scoop Smith , and Dan Dare for the new book, Parker also wrote a story about a team of six superheroes, each possessing a special power granted to them by a mythological figure. [10]

The thing about Captain Marvel is that the character is so pure and child-friendly at its core that it forces writers to modify their approach accordingly. As a result, more so than any other episode this season, "Power of Shazam" was geared more towards kids than it was us children-at-heart adults. That's more of an observation than a criticism, mind you. In embracing nearly every aspect of the Captain Marvel mythos – from Dr. Sivana and family, to Black Adam , the Wizard Shazam, the Rock of Eternity, the Seven Deadly Enemies of Man and everything in between – the episode delivered plenty of wonderfully crazy high concepts to meet its normal standard of inspired craziness.

If there was one main difference between " The Power of Shazam " and the majority of this season's outings, it's that the episode had more of a classic, saccharine sweet Disney vibe than the tongue-in-cheek, post-modern color it often takes on. Again, that's not really meant as a criticism. I loved the way the episode used both Billy Batson's oppressive life in an orphanage and the arrival of Black Adam to underscore his yearning for a family before finally paying it off with the arrival of Mary Marvel. It made for a rather heart-warming conclusion and certainly paved the way for the debut of the larger Marvel family in future episodes.

There was also plenty of action to satisfy both younger and older fans of the show alike. Batman's mech-warrior armor made another cool appearance, and the super-powered slugfests between first Captain Marvel and Black Adam and later Marvel and the magically-charged "Captain" Sivana made for some awesome action-packed sequences. As noted in last week's review, the series' animation seems to be growing sharper and more impressive as the season goes on. Having a character as unapologetically maniacal as Sivana along to punctuate the blows with such comments as "You're no match for me, Bat boob!" never hurt an action scene, either.

Written and illustrated by Jerry Ordway, The Power of Shazam was DC’s attempt at a Captain Marvel relaunch in the early ’90s. A Shazam series in the late ’80s failed to reinvent the character and the final purchase of all of Fawcett’s assets allowed a relaunch closer to the original Fawcett Comics origins.

I love Captain Marvel (aka Shazam) and remember watching the show when I was little. First apppearing in Whiz Comics #2 (February 1940), the character didn’t ever reach his early popularity even when acquired by DC in the ’70s. Here, Ordway manages to pull together both the past and modernize it in a way that makes The Power of Shazam a great looking book and a fun read.

I really enjoy the modernized Captain Marvel story. Ordway tightened the story by bringing together a lot of the aspects of the original comics into one concise story that still leaves plenty of room for exploration. Captain Marvel was always very cartoony but the dream of kids who read comic books. He was a kid, treated as an adult, and who got to play in the big leagues with other heroes like Superman and Batman…and Ordway captures this perfectly.


51HuFvHbbGL