WEFOUNDEarly Drawings: Lithographs, Pencil Sketches, Watercolours, Oil Studies etc. by Thomas Sidney Cooper R.A.(1803-1902) from the Collections of the Royal Museum, Canterbury and Kenneth J.Westwood


Despite recent statements about how “Harry is done now,” it seems as though J.K. Rowling isn’t quite done gifting fans with new Harry Potter tidbits.

After announcing that she would be releasing three new collections of wizarding world short stories on Pottermore Sept. 6, the author took to the interactive fan site to reveal a series of drawings she sketched while writing the story of the boy who lived.

The illustrations — which include depictions of Harry looking into the Mirror of Erised, Professor McGonagall scolding Peeves and Snape teaching a potions class — are scattered throughout the site and appeared at an unknown date.

Installation view of Claes Oldenburg: Early Sculpture, Drawings, Happenings and Films (May 7 – September 6, 2009) at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY. (L-R) ) Scarface and Aphrodite, 1963 (E.2009.0547); Autobodys, 1963 (E.2009.0546); Birth of the Flag I, II, 1965 (edited 1974) (E.2009.0548). Photography by Sheldan C. Collins. © Claes Oldenburg

Installation view of Claes Oldenburg: Early Sculpture, Drawings, Happenings and Films (May 7 – September 6, 2009) at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY. (L-R) ) Scarface and Aphrodite, 1963 (E.2009.0547); Autobodys, 1963 (E.2009.0546); Birth of the Flag I, II, 1965 (edited 1974) (E.2009.0548). Photography by Sheldan C. Collins. © Claes Oldenburg

Claes Oldenburg (b. 1929), French Fries and Ketchup, 1963. Vinyl and kapok fibers, 10 1/2 × 42 × 44 in. (26.7 × 106 .7 × 111.8 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; 50th Anniversary Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Meltzer 79.37a-g. © Claes Oldenburg. Photograph by Geoffrey Clements

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“I have always been interested in the concept of fragmentation and with ideas of abstraction and explosion, de-constructing ideas of repetitiveness and mass production. My work first engaged with the early Russian avant-garde; in particular with the work of Kasimir Malevich – he was an early influence for me as a representative of the modern avant-garde intersection between art and design. Malevich discovered abstraction as an experimental principle that can propel creative work to previously unheard levels of invention; this abstract work allowed much greater levels of creativity.” Zaha Hadid, 2007

The exhibition will take place at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery, renovated and extended by Zaha Hadid Architects in 2013. A select number of institutions and museums across the world will join in this timely homage to Zaha Hadid.

Drawing and painting were fundamental to Hadid’s practice. Influenced by Malevich, Tatlin and Rodchenko, she used calligraphic drawings as the main method for visualising her architectural ideas. For Hadid, painting was a design tool, and abstraction an investigative structure for imagining architecture and its relationship to the world we live in. These works on paper and canvas unravel an architecture that Hadid was determined to realise in built structures, one that is seen in the characteristic lightness and weightlessness of her buildings. Conceived as Hadid’s manifesto of a utopian world, the show reveals her all-encompassing vision for arranging space and interpreting realities.

David Hockney: Early Drawings , Friday September 25 to Friday October 23 2015 at Offer Waterman, 17 St George Street, London W1 (020-7042 3233; www.waterman.co.uk ). Tuesday November 3 to Tuesday December 1 at Paul Kasmin Gallery, 297 10th Avenue, New York, NY 10001 (+1212-563 4474; www.paulkasmingallery.com ).

Modern British art specialist Offer Waterman celebrates its new Mayfair gallery space with an exhibition of 55 works on paper by David Hockney, running from Friday September 25 to Friday October 23. Such a humdinger is the show that straight afterwards it moves to curatorial collaborator Paul Kasmin Gallery in New York.

Early Drawings features a colourful collection (some on loan, some available to buy from £48,000) of the artist’s pencil, charcoal and ink drawings from his student days at the RCA in the 1960s, via his LA jaunt, and through to his travel adventures in the 1970s. Some are intimate portraits of Hockney’s inner circle (including Celia Birtwell, WH Auden, Peter Schlesinger and Mark Glazebrook), some still life and some prints, such as his acclaimed A Rake’s Progress series.

Despite recent statements about how “Harry is done now,” it seems as though J.K. Rowling isn’t quite done gifting fans with new Harry Potter tidbits.

After announcing that she would be releasing three new collections of wizarding world short stories on Pottermore Sept. 6, the author took to the interactive fan site to reveal a series of drawings she sketched while writing the story of the boy who lived.

The illustrations — which include depictions of Harry looking into the Mirror of Erised, Professor McGonagall scolding Peeves and Snape teaching a potions class — are scattered throughout the site and appeared at an unknown date.

Despite recent statements about how “Harry is done now,” it seems as though J.K. Rowling isn’t quite done gifting fans with new Harry Potter tidbits.

After announcing that she would be releasing three new collections of wizarding world short stories on Pottermore Sept. 6, the author took to the interactive fan site to reveal a series of drawings she sketched while writing the story of the boy who lived.

The illustrations — which include depictions of Harry looking into the Mirror of Erised, Professor McGonagall scolding Peeves and Snape teaching a potions class — are scattered throughout the site and appeared at an unknown date.

Installation view of Claes Oldenburg: Early Sculpture, Drawings, Happenings and Films (May 7 – September 6, 2009) at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY. (L-R) ) Scarface and Aphrodite, 1963 (E.2009.0547); Autobodys, 1963 (E.2009.0546); Birth of the Flag I, II, 1965 (edited 1974) (E.2009.0548). Photography by Sheldan C. Collins. © Claes Oldenburg

Installation view of Claes Oldenburg: Early Sculpture, Drawings, Happenings and Films (May 7 – September 6, 2009) at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY. (L-R) ) Scarface and Aphrodite, 1963 (E.2009.0547); Autobodys, 1963 (E.2009.0546); Birth of the Flag I, II, 1965 (edited 1974) (E.2009.0548). Photography by Sheldan C. Collins. © Claes Oldenburg

Claes Oldenburg (b. 1929), French Fries and Ketchup, 1963. Vinyl and kapok fibers, 10 1/2 × 42 × 44 in. (26.7 × 106 .7 × 111.8 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; 50th Anniversary Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Meltzer 79.37a-g. © Claes Oldenburg. Photograph by Geoffrey Clements

Despite recent statements about how “Harry is done now,” it seems as though J.K. Rowling isn’t quite done gifting fans with new Harry Potter tidbits.

After announcing that she would be releasing three new collections of wizarding world short stories on Pottermore Sept. 6, the author took to the interactive fan site to reveal a series of drawings she sketched while writing the story of the boy who lived.

The illustrations — which include depictions of Harry looking into the Mirror of Erised, Professor McGonagall scolding Peeves and Snape teaching a potions class — are scattered throughout the site and appeared at an unknown date.

Installation view of Claes Oldenburg: Early Sculpture, Drawings, Happenings and Films (May 7 – September 6, 2009) at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY. (L-R) ) Scarface and Aphrodite, 1963 (E.2009.0547); Autobodys, 1963 (E.2009.0546); Birth of the Flag I, II, 1965 (edited 1974) (E.2009.0548). Photography by Sheldan C. Collins. © Claes Oldenburg

Installation view of Claes Oldenburg: Early Sculpture, Drawings, Happenings and Films (May 7 – September 6, 2009) at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY. (L-R) ) Scarface and Aphrodite, 1963 (E.2009.0547); Autobodys, 1963 (E.2009.0546); Birth of the Flag I, II, 1965 (edited 1974) (E.2009.0548). Photography by Sheldan C. Collins. © Claes Oldenburg

Claes Oldenburg (b. 1929), French Fries and Ketchup, 1963. Vinyl and kapok fibers, 10 1/2 × 42 × 44 in. (26.7 × 106 .7 × 111.8 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; 50th Anniversary Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Meltzer 79.37a-g. © Claes Oldenburg. Photograph by Geoffrey Clements

MILLIONAIRE RAFFLE DRAWING: 1/06/2018

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“I have always been interested in the concept of fragmentation and with ideas of abstraction and explosion, de-constructing ideas of repetitiveness and mass production. My work first engaged with the early Russian avant-garde; in particular with the work of Kasimir Malevich – he was an early influence for me as a representative of the modern avant-garde intersection between art and design. Malevich discovered abstraction as an experimental principle that can propel creative work to previously unheard levels of invention; this abstract work allowed much greater levels of creativity.” Zaha Hadid, 2007

The exhibition will take place at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery, renovated and extended by Zaha Hadid Architects in 2013. A select number of institutions and museums across the world will join in this timely homage to Zaha Hadid.

Drawing and painting were fundamental to Hadid’s practice. Influenced by Malevich, Tatlin and Rodchenko, she used calligraphic drawings as the main method for visualising her architectural ideas. For Hadid, painting was a design tool, and abstraction an investigative structure for imagining architecture and its relationship to the world we live in. These works on paper and canvas unravel an architecture that Hadid was determined to realise in built structures, one that is seen in the characteristic lightness and weightlessness of her buildings. Conceived as Hadid’s manifesto of a utopian world, the show reveals her all-encompassing vision for arranging space and interpreting realities.

Despite recent statements about how “Harry is done now,” it seems as though J.K. Rowling isn’t quite done gifting fans with new Harry Potter tidbits.

After announcing that she would be releasing three new collections of wizarding world short stories on Pottermore Sept. 6, the author took to the interactive fan site to reveal a series of drawings she sketched while writing the story of the boy who lived.

The illustrations — which include depictions of Harry looking into the Mirror of Erised, Professor McGonagall scolding Peeves and Snape teaching a potions class — are scattered throughout the site and appeared at an unknown date.

Installation view of Claes Oldenburg: Early Sculpture, Drawings, Happenings and Films (May 7 – September 6, 2009) at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY. (L-R) ) Scarface and Aphrodite, 1963 (E.2009.0547); Autobodys, 1963 (E.2009.0546); Birth of the Flag I, II, 1965 (edited 1974) (E.2009.0548). Photography by Sheldan C. Collins. © Claes Oldenburg

Installation view of Claes Oldenburg: Early Sculpture, Drawings, Happenings and Films (May 7 – September 6, 2009) at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY. (L-R) ) Scarface and Aphrodite, 1963 (E.2009.0547); Autobodys, 1963 (E.2009.0546); Birth of the Flag I, II, 1965 (edited 1974) (E.2009.0548). Photography by Sheldan C. Collins. © Claes Oldenburg

Claes Oldenburg (b. 1929), French Fries and Ketchup, 1963. Vinyl and kapok fibers, 10 1/2 × 42 × 44 in. (26.7 × 106 .7 × 111.8 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; 50th Anniversary Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Meltzer 79.37a-g. © Claes Oldenburg. Photograph by Geoffrey Clements

MILLIONAIRE RAFFLE DRAWING: 1/06/2018

View all New Year's Millionaire Raffle winning numbers!


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