WEFOUNDAntiquity of the Name of Scott, With Brief Historical Notes: A Paper Read Before the Western Reserve Historical Society (Classic Reprint)


(1) This preface of Josephus is excellent in its kind, and highly worthy the repeated perusal of the reader, before he set about the perusal of the work itself.

(3) We may seasonably note here, that Josephus wrote his Seven Books of the Jewish War long before he wrote these his Antiquities. Those books of the War were published about A.D. 75, and these Antiquities, A. D. 93, about eighteen years later.

(4) This Epaphroditus was certainly alive in the third year of Trajan, A.D. 100. See the note on the First Book Against Apion, sect. 1. Who he was we do not know; for as to Epaphroditus, the freedman of Nero, and afterwards Domitian's secretary, who was put to death by Domitian in the 14th or 15th year of his reign, he could not be alive in the third of Trajan.

They themselves, by their very name, indicate how strong a feeling of their origin is still present with them. The name “Abyssinians” they utterly despise as a term, meaning in the Arabic, a mixed or mongrel people, which has been given by their enemies. They themselves adopt the historic name of “Ethiopians,” or, still better, the native name of “Geez”. The term, “Geez”, while originally meaning almost the same as the word “Hebrews” – those who crossed over-is generally employed in a later sense of “Freedmen.” By this term the people designate themselves, as did the “Franks” of the Middle Ages, as “a people of freedmen.”

In more than one respect the Abyssinians are a unique people. Their physical and mental peculiarities, chiefly their language, mark them as a purely Semitic people, the only people of that family which, as a nation, settled and worked out its historical mission on the Dark Continent. In their history, religion, and literature they have been practically uninfluenced by the Hamitic people around them, including the oldest representatives of civilization on the African continent, the Egyptian. To all intents and purposes the history of the Abyssinian people, as far as this can be traced in their literature, is a chapter in church history, and that, too, an interesting chapter.

From historic factors and forces like these only one result could come, and that was the petrification of thought and life in the Abyssinian people and Church. Substantially in their faith, services, liturgies, thought, and life, with the native conservative tendency so pronounced in the Semitic peoples, in Abyssinians we have a petrification and stereotyped formalism of the Greek Christian culture of the fifth century. But during this time this “hermit nation of Africa” has preserved a treasury of Christian works,lost largely to Greco-Latin literature, and which is now invaluable.

late 14c., "olden times," from Old French antiquitet (11c.; Modern French antiquité ) "olden times; great age; old age," from Latin antiquitatem (nominative antiquitas ) "ancient times, antiquity, venerableness," noun of quality from antiquus (see antique (adj.)). Specific reference to ancient Greece and Rome is from mid-15c.; meaning "quality of being old" is from about the same time. Antiquities "relics of ancient days" is from 1510s.

MEN'S NAMES IN EARLY MEDIEVAL IRELAND 
100 most common masculine given names from the pre-Norman period

NAMES OF ANCIENT IRELAND (HIBERNIA)
List of male & female names from the Early Medieval Period: 400 - 1200 A.D. VERY SLOW TO LOAD!

NAMES OF IRELAND 
Ireland today not only uses her native names from Gaeilge but adopted foreign names transmuted into pseudo-Gaeilge names (Gaelicizations) and anglicized versions of Gaeilge names

(1) This preface of Josephus is excellent in its kind, and highly worthy the repeated perusal of the reader, before he set about the perusal of the work itself.

(3) We may seasonably note here, that Josephus wrote his Seven Books of the Jewish War long before he wrote these his Antiquities. Those books of the War were published about A.D. 75, and these Antiquities, A. D. 93, about eighteen years later.

(4) This Epaphroditus was certainly alive in the third year of Trajan, A.D. 100. See the note on the First Book Against Apion, sect. 1. Who he was we do not know; for as to Epaphroditus, the freedman of Nero, and afterwards Domitian's secretary, who was put to death by Domitian in the 14th or 15th year of his reign, he could not be alive in the third of Trajan.

They themselves, by their very name, indicate how strong a feeling of their origin is still present with them. The name “Abyssinians” they utterly despise as a term, meaning in the Arabic, a mixed or mongrel people, which has been given by their enemies. They themselves adopt the historic name of “Ethiopians,” or, still better, the native name of “Geez”. The term, “Geez”, while originally meaning almost the same as the word “Hebrews” – those who crossed over-is generally employed in a later sense of “Freedmen.” By this term the people designate themselves, as did the “Franks” of the Middle Ages, as “a people of freedmen.”

In more than one respect the Abyssinians are a unique people. Their physical and mental peculiarities, chiefly their language, mark them as a purely Semitic people, the only people of that family which, as a nation, settled and worked out its historical mission on the Dark Continent. In their history, religion, and literature they have been practically uninfluenced by the Hamitic people around them, including the oldest representatives of civilization on the African continent, the Egyptian. To all intents and purposes the history of the Abyssinian people, as far as this can be traced in their literature, is a chapter in church history, and that, too, an interesting chapter.

From historic factors and forces like these only one result could come, and that was the petrification of thought and life in the Abyssinian people and Church. Substantially in their faith, services, liturgies, thought, and life, with the native conservative tendency so pronounced in the Semitic peoples, in Abyssinians we have a petrification and stereotyped formalism of the Greek Christian culture of the fifth century. But during this time this “hermit nation of Africa” has preserved a treasury of Christian works,lost largely to Greco-Latin literature, and which is now invaluable.

late 14c., "olden times," from Old French antiquitet (11c.; Modern French antiquité ) "olden times; great age; old age," from Latin antiquitatem (nominative antiquitas ) "ancient times, antiquity, venerableness," noun of quality from antiquus (see antique (adj.)). Specific reference to ancient Greece and Rome is from mid-15c.; meaning "quality of being old" is from about the same time. Antiquities "relics of ancient days" is from 1510s.

(1) This preface of Josephus is excellent in its kind, and highly worthy the repeated perusal of the reader, before he set about the perusal of the work itself.

(3) We may seasonably note here, that Josephus wrote his Seven Books of the Jewish War long before he wrote these his Antiquities. Those books of the War were published about A.D. 75, and these Antiquities, A. D. 93, about eighteen years later.

(4) This Epaphroditus was certainly alive in the third year of Trajan, A.D. 100. See the note on the First Book Against Apion, sect. 1. Who he was we do not know; for as to Epaphroditus, the freedman of Nero, and afterwards Domitian's secretary, who was put to death by Domitian in the 14th or 15th year of his reign, he could not be alive in the third of Trajan.

(1) This preface of Josephus is excellent in its kind, and highly worthy the repeated perusal of the reader, before he set about the perusal of the work itself.

(3) We may seasonably note here, that Josephus wrote his Seven Books of the Jewish War long before he wrote these his Antiquities. Those books of the War were published about A.D. 75, and these Antiquities, A. D. 93, about eighteen years later.

(4) This Epaphroditus was certainly alive in the third year of Trajan, A.D. 100. See the note on the First Book Against Apion, sect. 1. Who he was we do not know; for as to Epaphroditus, the freedman of Nero, and afterwards Domitian's secretary, who was put to death by Domitian in the 14th or 15th year of his reign, he could not be alive in the third of Trajan.

They themselves, by their very name, indicate how strong a feeling of their origin is still present with them. The name “Abyssinians” they utterly despise as a term, meaning in the Arabic, a mixed or mongrel people, which has been given by their enemies. They themselves adopt the historic name of “Ethiopians,” or, still better, the native name of “Geez”. The term, “Geez”, while originally meaning almost the same as the word “Hebrews” – those who crossed over-is generally employed in a later sense of “Freedmen.” By this term the people designate themselves, as did the “Franks” of the Middle Ages, as “a people of freedmen.”

In more than one respect the Abyssinians are a unique people. Their physical and mental peculiarities, chiefly their language, mark them as a purely Semitic people, the only people of that family which, as a nation, settled and worked out its historical mission on the Dark Continent. In their history, religion, and literature they have been practically uninfluenced by the Hamitic people around them, including the oldest representatives of civilization on the African continent, the Egyptian. To all intents and purposes the history of the Abyssinian people, as far as this can be traced in their literature, is a chapter in church history, and that, too, an interesting chapter.

From historic factors and forces like these only one result could come, and that was the petrification of thought and life in the Abyssinian people and Church. Substantially in their faith, services, liturgies, thought, and life, with the native conservative tendency so pronounced in the Semitic peoples, in Abyssinians we have a petrification and stereotyped formalism of the Greek Christian culture of the fifth century. But during this time this “hermit nation of Africa” has preserved a treasury of Christian works,lost largely to Greco-Latin literature, and which is now invaluable.

(1) This preface of Josephus is excellent in its kind, and highly worthy the repeated perusal of the reader, before he set about the perusal of the work itself.

(3) We may seasonably note here, that Josephus wrote his Seven Books of the Jewish War long before he wrote these his Antiquities. Those books of the War were published about A.D. 75, and these Antiquities, A. D. 93, about eighteen years later.

(4) This Epaphroditus was certainly alive in the third year of Trajan, A.D. 100. See the note on the First Book Against Apion, sect. 1. Who he was we do not know; for as to Epaphroditus, the freedman of Nero, and afterwards Domitian's secretary, who was put to death by Domitian in the 14th or 15th year of his reign, he could not be alive in the third of Trajan.

They themselves, by their very name, indicate how strong a feeling of their origin is still present with them. The name “Abyssinians” they utterly despise as a term, meaning in the Arabic, a mixed or mongrel people, which has been given by their enemies. They themselves adopt the historic name of “Ethiopians,” or, still better, the native name of “Geez”. The term, “Geez”, while originally meaning almost the same as the word “Hebrews” – those who crossed over-is generally employed in a later sense of “Freedmen.” By this term the people designate themselves, as did the “Franks” of the Middle Ages, as “a people of freedmen.”

In more than one respect the Abyssinians are a unique people. Their physical and mental peculiarities, chiefly their language, mark them as a purely Semitic people, the only people of that family which, as a nation, settled and worked out its historical mission on the Dark Continent. In their history, religion, and literature they have been practically uninfluenced by the Hamitic people around them, including the oldest representatives of civilization on the African continent, the Egyptian. To all intents and purposes the history of the Abyssinian people, as far as this can be traced in their literature, is a chapter in church history, and that, too, an interesting chapter.

From historic factors and forces like these only one result could come, and that was the petrification of thought and life in the Abyssinian people and Church. Substantially in their faith, services, liturgies, thought, and life, with the native conservative tendency so pronounced in the Semitic peoples, in Abyssinians we have a petrification and stereotyped formalism of the Greek Christian culture of the fifth century. But during this time this “hermit nation of Africa” has preserved a treasury of Christian works,lost largely to Greco-Latin literature, and which is now invaluable.

late 14c., "olden times," from Old French antiquitet (11c.; Modern French antiquité ) "olden times; great age; old age," from Latin antiquitatem (nominative antiquitas ) "ancient times, antiquity, venerableness," noun of quality from antiquus (see antique (adj.)). Specific reference to ancient Greece and Rome is from mid-15c.; meaning "quality of being old" is from about the same time. Antiquities "relics of ancient days" is from 1510s.

MEN'S NAMES IN EARLY MEDIEVAL IRELAND 
100 most common masculine given names from the pre-Norman period

NAMES OF ANCIENT IRELAND (HIBERNIA)
List of male & female names from the Early Medieval Period: 400 - 1200 A.D. VERY SLOW TO LOAD!

NAMES OF IRELAND 
Ireland today not only uses her native names from Gaeilge but adopted foreign names transmuted into pseudo-Gaeilge names (Gaelicizations) and anglicized versions of Gaeilge names

The religious traditions of antiquity continue to astound and delight modern-day people who appreciate the history of their cultures or the endearing power of their myths. If you're looking for a specific deity, consult an  alphabetical list of the major gods and goddesses  instead.

Although the Aztec worshiped more than 200 different deities spanning three broad classes of Aztec life (the heavens, fertility and agriculture, and war) scholars have identified 10 of them as being most important.

Among the most ancient of cultures, the people of Babylon developed a diverse melting pot of deities. Despite the vast number of individual gods in the various sub-cultures labeled as "Babylonian," 15 of these deities retain historical significance.

(1) This preface of Josephus is excellent in its kind, and highly worthy the repeated perusal of the reader, before he set about the perusal of the work itself.

(3) We may seasonably note here, that Josephus wrote his Seven Books of the Jewish War long before he wrote these his Antiquities. Those books of the War were published about A.D. 75, and these Antiquities, A. D. 93, about eighteen years later.

(4) This Epaphroditus was certainly alive in the third year of Trajan, A.D. 100. See the note on the First Book Against Apion, sect. 1. Who he was we do not know; for as to Epaphroditus, the freedman of Nero, and afterwards Domitian's secretary, who was put to death by Domitian in the 14th or 15th year of his reign, he could not be alive in the third of Trajan.

They themselves, by their very name, indicate how strong a feeling of their origin is still present with them. The name “Abyssinians” they utterly despise as a term, meaning in the Arabic, a mixed or mongrel people, which has been given by their enemies. They themselves adopt the historic name of “Ethiopians,” or, still better, the native name of “Geez”. The term, “Geez”, while originally meaning almost the same as the word “Hebrews” – those who crossed over-is generally employed in a later sense of “Freedmen.” By this term the people designate themselves, as did the “Franks” of the Middle Ages, as “a people of freedmen.”

In more than one respect the Abyssinians are a unique people. Their physical and mental peculiarities, chiefly their language, mark them as a purely Semitic people, the only people of that family which, as a nation, settled and worked out its historical mission on the Dark Continent. In their history, religion, and literature they have been practically uninfluenced by the Hamitic people around them, including the oldest representatives of civilization on the African continent, the Egyptian. To all intents and purposes the history of the Abyssinian people, as far as this can be traced in their literature, is a chapter in church history, and that, too, an interesting chapter.

From historic factors and forces like these only one result could come, and that was the petrification of thought and life in the Abyssinian people and Church. Substantially in their faith, services, liturgies, thought, and life, with the native conservative tendency so pronounced in the Semitic peoples, in Abyssinians we have a petrification and stereotyped formalism of the Greek Christian culture of the fifth century. But during this time this “hermit nation of Africa” has preserved a treasury of Christian works,lost largely to Greco-Latin literature, and which is now invaluable.

late 14c., "olden times," from Old French antiquitet (11c.; Modern French antiquité ) "olden times; great age; old age," from Latin antiquitatem (nominative antiquitas ) "ancient times, antiquity, venerableness," noun of quality from antiquus (see antique (adj.)). Specific reference to ancient Greece and Rome is from mid-15c.; meaning "quality of being old" is from about the same time. Antiquities "relics of ancient days" is from 1510s.

MEN'S NAMES IN EARLY MEDIEVAL IRELAND 
100 most common masculine given names from the pre-Norman period

NAMES OF ANCIENT IRELAND (HIBERNIA)
List of male & female names from the Early Medieval Period: 400 - 1200 A.D. VERY SLOW TO LOAD!

NAMES OF IRELAND 
Ireland today not only uses her native names from Gaeilge but adopted foreign names transmuted into pseudo-Gaeilge names (Gaelicizations) and anglicized versions of Gaeilge names

The religious traditions of antiquity continue to astound and delight modern-day people who appreciate the history of their cultures or the endearing power of their myths. If you're looking for a specific deity, consult an  alphabetical list of the major gods and goddesses  instead.

Although the Aztec worshiped more than 200 different deities spanning three broad classes of Aztec life (the heavens, fertility and agriculture, and war) scholars have identified 10 of them as being most important.

Among the most ancient of cultures, the people of Babylon developed a diverse melting pot of deities. Despite the vast number of individual gods in the various sub-cultures labeled as "Babylonian," 15 of these deities retain historical significance.

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