WEFOUNDTales From the Radiation Age


The download of the game doesn't contain viruses or any kind of malware. Sylok Media by MGrup is the official developer of this application which can be found in the Arcade Games category. The app has the average rating 4.8 on Google Play.

The latest update of the game was launched on October 22, 2016 and Squirrel Tales has been set up by over 100 users. Pay attention to adverts and in-app purchases while launching this application. Download the setup package of Squirrel Tales 1.1 that is absolutely free and check out users' reviews on Droid Informer. The app runs flawlessly on Android 2.3.3 and higher.

Please choose whether or not you want other users to be able to see on your profile that this library is a favorite of yours.

Hey cats and kittens. For those of you who haven’t yet found your way into the strange world which launched this site, I am pleased to announce that Kindle editions of Tales From The Radiation Age are now on sale at Amazon for just $1.99 .

No, seriously. A buck-nine-nine. Which means that, for less than a cup of one of your fancy-pantsy coffees, you can get 575 pages of giant robots, dinosaur attacks, temporospatial shenanigans, whiskey drinking, hookers, mad scientists and bar fights . 575 pages of a world gone wrong–a joyous apocalypse that gives a big, fat middle finger to all your miserable, gray-faced dystopias. 575 pages of spies, grifters, pretty girls, semen-thieves, train-robbers, idiots and madmen, all just trying to get by in a future where the folks with the brains are far more dangerous than the folks with the guns. Most of the time, anyway.

Want a taste before you go blowing all your folding money on a bunch of silly words from the likes of me? Of course you do. Like the man says, the first one is always free…

With the launch of Sputnik 1 in October 1957, there was a flurry of effort in the United States to send up some kind of answer to the Soviets’ first space flight achievement. Scrambling for a useful payload to send up with the first U.S. satellite—Explorer 1—the one set of instruments ready to go included a cosmic ray detector (essentially a Geiger counter) designed by scientist James Van Allen. His basic research concerning radiation in space at the University of Iowa, which led directly to Explorer 1’s payload, was funded by the Office of Naval Research.

Launched in January 1958, Explorer 1 was followed some weeks later by Explorer 3 with similar instruments on board. The combined data from the two satellites confirmed the first major scientific discovery of the Space Age: there was a series of “belts” of radiation encircling the Earth composed of charged particles trapped by the planet’s magnetic field. Any spacecraft leaving the Earth’s atmosphere would have to be designed to deal with these belts of radiation.

The discovery of these belts, named for Van Allen during a meeting of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Physical Society on May 1, 1958, alerted the space programs to new dangers both to electronics as well as to life and limb. In addition, entirely new areas of science were founded as a result of this discovery—such as plasma physics and magnetospheric physics—to investigate the complex relationship between the Earth and the Sun.

Editor’s Note: I did this post a while back for Richard Ellis Preston’s excellent blog, A Bag Of Good Writing . He asked me to lay out the differences between steampunk and dieselpunk because I had (rather accidentally) written a dieselpunk book with A Private Little War and he’s well known for turning out fine steampunk tales . What began as a small conversation ballooned into a bit of a manifesto, and since I like a good manifesto now and again (because they mean you care about something, and caring is a fine tonic against snark and cynicism), I figured I’d reprint it here. Please to enjoy…

Let me begin by saying that I love all you Steampunks . I truly do. I love your airships and your fancy goggles, your aether and your flywheels. I’m not just saying this because I’m writing here, in one of the bastions of steampunkery, but because I really am a fan. Corsets and cogs, pipeworks and pistols—I get the attraction to both the physical details of the setting and the joyously weird, post-modern frisson of plunking an evolved and of-the-moment characters down into a place where their very modernity drives the style and conflict.

But mostly I love you cats for your victory. Among all the various and scattered blank-punk sects out there, it is the steampunks who have moved the cultural needle the furthest. And I know this because, in the course of putting together my most recent book, the Kindle serial, Tales From The Radiation Age , I had no less than three people (one publishing professional, one working writer and one of my early readers) come to me and ask, “Hey, uh, you gonna put any of that steampunk in this book? Because people really seem to be into that these days…”

The download of the game doesn't contain viruses or any kind of malware. Sylok Media by MGrup is the official developer of this application which can be found in the Arcade Games category. The app has the average rating 4.8 on Google Play.

The latest update of the game was launched on October 22, 2016 and Squirrel Tales has been set up by over 100 users. Pay attention to adverts and in-app purchases while launching this application. Download the setup package of Squirrel Tales 1.1 that is absolutely free and check out users' reviews on Droid Informer. The app runs flawlessly on Android 2.3.3 and higher.

Please choose whether or not you want other users to be able to see on your profile that this library is a favorite of yours.

Hey cats and kittens. For those of you who haven’t yet found your way into the strange world which launched this site, I am pleased to announce that Kindle editions of Tales From The Radiation Age are now on sale at Amazon for just $1.99 .

No, seriously. A buck-nine-nine. Which means that, for less than a cup of one of your fancy-pantsy coffees, you can get 575 pages of giant robots, dinosaur attacks, temporospatial shenanigans, whiskey drinking, hookers, mad scientists and bar fights . 575 pages of a world gone wrong–a joyous apocalypse that gives a big, fat middle finger to all your miserable, gray-faced dystopias. 575 pages of spies, grifters, pretty girls, semen-thieves, train-robbers, idiots and madmen, all just trying to get by in a future where the folks with the brains are far more dangerous than the folks with the guns. Most of the time, anyway.

Want a taste before you go blowing all your folding money on a bunch of silly words from the likes of me? Of course you do. Like the man says, the first one is always free…

With the launch of Sputnik 1 in October 1957, there was a flurry of effort in the United States to send up some kind of answer to the Soviets’ first space flight achievement. Scrambling for a useful payload to send up with the first U.S. satellite—Explorer 1—the one set of instruments ready to go included a cosmic ray detector (essentially a Geiger counter) designed by scientist James Van Allen. His basic research concerning radiation in space at the University of Iowa, which led directly to Explorer 1’s payload, was funded by the Office of Naval Research.

Launched in January 1958, Explorer 1 was followed some weeks later by Explorer 3 with similar instruments on board. The combined data from the two satellites confirmed the first major scientific discovery of the Space Age: there was a series of “belts” of radiation encircling the Earth composed of charged particles trapped by the planet’s magnetic field. Any spacecraft leaving the Earth’s atmosphere would have to be designed to deal with these belts of radiation.

The discovery of these belts, named for Van Allen during a meeting of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Physical Society on May 1, 1958, alerted the space programs to new dangers both to electronics as well as to life and limb. In addition, entirely new areas of science were founded as a result of this discovery—such as plasma physics and magnetospheric physics—to investigate the complex relationship between the Earth and the Sun.

The download of the game doesn't contain viruses or any kind of malware. Sylok Media by MGrup is the official developer of this application which can be found in the Arcade Games category. The app has the average rating 4.8 on Google Play.

The latest update of the game was launched on October 22, 2016 and Squirrel Tales has been set up by over 100 users. Pay attention to adverts and in-app purchases while launching this application. Download the setup package of Squirrel Tales 1.1 that is absolutely free and check out users' reviews on Droid Informer. The app runs flawlessly on Android 2.3.3 and higher.

Please choose whether or not you want other users to be able to see on your profile that this library is a favorite of yours.

Hey cats and kittens. For those of you who haven’t yet found your way into the strange world which launched this site, I am pleased to announce that Kindle editions of Tales From The Radiation Age are now on sale at Amazon for just $1.99 .

No, seriously. A buck-nine-nine. Which means that, for less than a cup of one of your fancy-pantsy coffees, you can get 575 pages of giant robots, dinosaur attacks, temporospatial shenanigans, whiskey drinking, hookers, mad scientists and bar fights . 575 pages of a world gone wrong–a joyous apocalypse that gives a big, fat middle finger to all your miserable, gray-faced dystopias. 575 pages of spies, grifters, pretty girls, semen-thieves, train-robbers, idiots and madmen, all just trying to get by in a future where the folks with the brains are far more dangerous than the folks with the guns. Most of the time, anyway.

Want a taste before you go blowing all your folding money on a bunch of silly words from the likes of me? Of course you do. Like the man says, the first one is always free…

The download of the game doesn't contain viruses or any kind of malware. Sylok Media by MGrup is the official developer of this application which can be found in the Arcade Games category. The app has the average rating 4.8 on Google Play.

The latest update of the game was launched on October 22, 2016 and Squirrel Tales has been set up by over 100 users. Pay attention to adverts and in-app purchases while launching this application. Download the setup package of Squirrel Tales 1.1 that is absolutely free and check out users' reviews on Droid Informer. The app runs flawlessly on Android 2.3.3 and higher.

The download of the game doesn't contain viruses or any kind of malware. Sylok Media by MGrup is the official developer of this application which can be found in the Arcade Games category. The app has the average rating 4.8 on Google Play.

The latest update of the game was launched on October 22, 2016 and Squirrel Tales has been set up by over 100 users. Pay attention to adverts and in-app purchases while launching this application. Download the setup package of Squirrel Tales 1.1 that is absolutely free and check out users' reviews on Droid Informer. The app runs flawlessly on Android 2.3.3 and higher.

Please choose whether or not you want other users to be able to see on your profile that this library is a favorite of yours.


51m5y8O4s-L