WEFOUNDSuicide Squad Vol. 7: The Dragon's Hoard (Ostrander)


It's taken a while, given it's short, choppy structure, but "The Black Vault" is rapidly approaching its conclusion. And this arc seems to be getting better as it moves towards the finish line, with issue #7 offering one of the better-paced and more memorable chapters to date.

The rest of the main story in this issue is pretty much violence and carnage, with a healthy dose of black humor thrown in for good measure. It's a great fit for Jim Lee's kinetic, detailed art style, naturally. Lee's work remains strong even after seven issues, and even with so many inkers on board in this installment. His action scenes are a thrill to see unfold, and he does a fine job of depicting Harley in her semi-normal new mindset. Alex Sinclair's colors are also great about conveying the violent, chaotic nature of the script and generating a sense of unease and mounting doom. The strong emphasis on blue tones adeptly shows the growing influence of the Black Vault.

It doesn't hurt that this issue boasts one of the stronger backup features to date. This time it's the Enchantress' turn at bat. This story stands out mainly because Williams finds a more creative structure than "Waller interrogates a prisoner and repeats their origin story back to the." Instead, the script organically explores the June Moone/Enchantress connection as she confronts a demon and is tempted by freedom. Christian Ward's surreal art is a perfect complement to this supernaturally charged story. His character designs are suitably creepy, and his ethereal colors really tie the whole package together.

Amanda Waller puts together a special team that includes Suicide Squad founding members Nemesis, Nightshade, Bronze Tiger and Deadshot for a personal mission to preserve the legacy of Rick Flag!

Amanda Waller puts together a special team that includes Suicide Squad founding members Nemesis, Nightshade, Bronze Tiger and Deadshot for a personal mission to preserve the legacy of Rick Flag!

It's taken a while, given it's short, choppy structure, but "The Black Vault" is rapidly approaching its conclusion. And this arc seems to be getting better as it moves towards the finish line, with issue #7 offering one of the better-paced and more memorable chapters to date.

The rest of the main story in this issue is pretty much violence and carnage, with a healthy dose of black humor thrown in for good measure. It's a great fit for Jim Lee's kinetic, detailed art style, naturally. Lee's work remains strong even after seven issues, and even with so many inkers on board in this installment. His action scenes are a thrill to see unfold, and he does a fine job of depicting Harley in her semi-normal new mindset. Alex Sinclair's colors are also great about conveying the violent, chaotic nature of the script and generating a sense of unease and mounting doom. The strong emphasis on blue tones adeptly shows the growing influence of the Black Vault.

It doesn't hurt that this issue boasts one of the stronger backup features to date. This time it's the Enchantress' turn at bat. This story stands out mainly because Williams finds a more creative structure than "Waller interrogates a prisoner and repeats their origin story back to the." Instead, the script organically explores the June Moone/Enchantress connection as she confronts a demon and is tempted by freedom. Christian Ward's surreal art is a perfect complement to this supernaturally charged story. His character designs are suitably creepy, and his ethereal colors really tie the whole package together.

It's taken a while, given it's short, choppy structure, but "The Black Vault" is rapidly approaching its conclusion. And this arc seems to be getting better as it moves towards the finish line, with issue #7 offering one of the better-paced and more memorable chapters to date.

The rest of the main story in this issue is pretty much violence and carnage, with a healthy dose of black humor thrown in for good measure. It's a great fit for Jim Lee's kinetic, detailed art style, naturally. Lee's work remains strong even after seven issues, and even with so many inkers on board in this installment. His action scenes are a thrill to see unfold, and he does a fine job of depicting Harley in her semi-normal new mindset. Alex Sinclair's colors are also great about conveying the violent, chaotic nature of the script and generating a sense of unease and mounting doom. The strong emphasis on blue tones adeptly shows the growing influence of the Black Vault.

It doesn't hurt that this issue boasts one of the stronger backup features to date. This time it's the Enchantress' turn at bat. This story stands out mainly because Williams finds a more creative structure than "Waller interrogates a prisoner and repeats their origin story back to the." Instead, the script organically explores the June Moone/Enchantress connection as she confronts a demon and is tempted by freedom. Christian Ward's surreal art is a perfect complement to this supernaturally charged story. His character designs are suitably creepy, and his ethereal colors really tie the whole package together.

Amanda Waller puts together a special team that includes Suicide Squad founding members Nemesis, Nightshade, Bronze Tiger and Deadshot for a personal mission to preserve the legacy of Rick Flag!

Amanda Waller puts together a special team that includes Suicide Squad founding members Nemesis, Nightshade, Bronze Tiger and Deadshot for a personal mission to preserve the legacy of Rick Flag!

New Suicide Squad: Vol. 1: ISBN ... suicide missions. Suicide Squad (vol. 1) lasted 66 issues, ... Suicide Squad #1-7: 2012: 1-4012-3544-1:

20.02.2018  · "Thrown to the Wolves": The Suicide Squad are given thirty minutes by the US government to...

Amanda Waller puts together a special team that includes Suicide Squad founding members Nemesis, Nightshade, Bronze Tiger and Deadshot for a personal mission to ...


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