WEFOUNDThe Philosophy of the Moral Feelings (Classic Reprint)


Discussions of the nature of time, and of various issues related to time, have always featured prominently in philosophy, but they have been especially important since the beginning of the 20th Century. This article contains a brief overview of some of the main topics in the philosophy of time — Fatalism; Reductionism and Platonism with respect to time; the topology of time; McTaggart's arguments; The A Theory and The B Theory; Presentism, Eternalism, and The Growing Universe Theory; time travel; and the 3D/4D controversy — together with some suggestions for further reading on each topic, and a bibliography.

Note: This entry does not discuss the consciousness, perception, experience, or phenomenology of time. An historical overview and general presentation of the various views is available in the entry on temporal consciousness . Further coverage can be found in the SEP entry on the experience and perception of time . For those interested specifically in phenomenological views, see the entries on Husserl (Section 6), and Heidegger (Section 2: Being and Time).

A good deal of work in the philosophy of time has been produced by people worried about Fatalism, which can be understood as the thesis that whatever will happen in the future is already unavoidable (where to say that an event is unavoidable is to say that no human is able to prevent it from occurring). Here is a typical argument for Fatalism.

The first and by far the most respected of the trilogy, The Matrix  "largely interprets Plato's Allegory of the Cave. Imagine a cave. Inside are people who were born and have spent their entire lives there, chained into a fixed position, only able to see the wall in front of them. As far as they know, this is the entire world." The Wachowskis ask the same question Plato does: "How do we know what our reality really is?"

When they have Morpheus bring Neo out of his "cave" of everyday late-20th-century existence, they do it in a manner analogous to Plato's Analogy of the Sun, in which "the sun is a metaphor for the nature of reality and knowledge concerning it," and the eyes of the fearful few forced out of their cave need some time to adjust to it.

Based in Seoul,  Colin Marshall  writes and broadcasts on cities a nd culture. He’s at work on a book about Los Angeles,  A Los Angeles Primer , the video series  The City in Cinema ,   the crowdfunded journalism project  Where Is the City of the Future? , and the  Los Angeles Review of Books’  Korea Blog .   Follow him on Twitter at  @colinmarshall  or on  Faceboo k .

Discussions of the nature of time, and of various issues related to time, have always featured prominently in philosophy, but they have been especially important since the beginning of the 20th Century. This article contains a brief overview of some of the main topics in the philosophy of time — Fatalism; Reductionism and Platonism with respect to time; the topology of time; McTaggart's arguments; The A Theory and The B Theory; Presentism, Eternalism, and The Growing Universe Theory; time travel; and the 3D/4D controversy — together with some suggestions for further reading on each topic, and a bibliography.

Note: This entry does not discuss the consciousness, perception, experience, or phenomenology of time. An historical overview and general presentation of the various views is available in the entry on temporal consciousness . Further coverage can be found in the SEP entry on the experience and perception of time . For those interested specifically in phenomenological views, see the entries on Husserl (Section 6), and Heidegger (Section 2: Being and Time).

A good deal of work in the philosophy of time has been produced by people worried about Fatalism, which can be understood as the thesis that whatever will happen in the future is already unavoidable (where to say that an event is unavoidable is to say that no human is able to prevent it from occurring). Here is a typical argument for Fatalism.

Discussions of the nature of time, and of various issues related to time, have always featured prominently in philosophy, but they have been especially important since the beginning of the 20th Century. This article contains a brief overview of some of the main topics in the philosophy of time — Fatalism; Reductionism and Platonism with respect to time; the topology of time; McTaggart's arguments; The A Theory and The B Theory; Presentism, Eternalism, and The Growing Universe Theory; time travel; and the 3D/4D controversy — together with some suggestions for further reading on each topic, and a bibliography.

Note: This entry does not discuss the consciousness, perception, experience, or phenomenology of time. An historical overview and general presentation of the various views is available in the entry on temporal consciousness . Further coverage can be found in the SEP entry on the experience and perception of time . For those interested specifically in phenomenological views, see the entries on Husserl (Section 6), and Heidegger (Section 2: Being and Time).

A good deal of work in the philosophy of time has been produced by people worried about Fatalism, which can be understood as the thesis that whatever will happen in the future is already unavoidable (where to say that an event is unavoidable is to say that no human is able to prevent it from occurring). Here is a typical argument for Fatalism.

The first and by far the most respected of the trilogy, The Matrix  "largely interprets Plato's Allegory of the Cave. Imagine a cave. Inside are people who were born and have spent their entire lives there, chained into a fixed position, only able to see the wall in front of them. As far as they know, this is the entire world." The Wachowskis ask the same question Plato does: "How do we know what our reality really is?"

When they have Morpheus bring Neo out of his "cave" of everyday late-20th-century existence, they do it in a manner analogous to Plato's Analogy of the Sun, in which "the sun is a metaphor for the nature of reality and knowledge concerning it," and the eyes of the fearful few forced out of their cave need some time to adjust to it.

Based in Seoul,  Colin Marshall  writes and broadcasts on cities a nd culture. He’s at work on a book about Los Angeles,  A Los Angeles Primer , the video series  The City in Cinema ,   the crowdfunded journalism project  Where Is the City of the Future? , and the  Los Angeles Review of Books’  Korea Blog .   Follow him on Twitter at  @colinmarshall  or on  Faceboo k .

The philosophy of liberty is not really difficult to understand. However, the principles that it consist of have to be applied to all situations if we are to achieve a peaceful, prosperous and free world.

Taylor Pace is a libertarian and anarcho-capitalist. He works as a respiratory therapist in critical care medicine. He aided in the founding of Young Americans for Liberty at Texas Tech University, serving as the first president. Taylor has also been a member of Liberty on the Rocks, Houston Voluntaryists, and America's Future Foundation.

I was going to transcribe the Philosophy of Liberty and realized I need not, as the following already does that concisely.

1 mass noun The study of the fundamental nature of knowledge, reality, and existence, especially when considered as an academic discipline.

Discussions of the nature of time, and of various issues related to time, have always featured prominently in philosophy, but they have been especially important since the beginning of the 20th Century. This article contains a brief overview of some of the main topics in the philosophy of time — Fatalism; Reductionism and Platonism with respect to time; the topology of time; McTaggart's arguments; The A Theory and The B Theory; Presentism, Eternalism, and The Growing Universe Theory; time travel; and the 3D/4D controversy — together with some suggestions for further reading on each topic, and a bibliography.

Note: This entry does not discuss the consciousness, perception, experience, or phenomenology of time. An historical overview and general presentation of the various views is available in the entry on temporal consciousness . Further coverage can be found in the SEP entry on the experience and perception of time . For those interested specifically in phenomenological views, see the entries on Husserl (Section 6), and Heidegger (Section 2: Being and Time).

A good deal of work in the philosophy of time has been produced by people worried about Fatalism, which can be understood as the thesis that whatever will happen in the future is already unavoidable (where to say that an event is unavoidable is to say that no human is able to prevent it from occurring). Here is a typical argument for Fatalism.

The first and by far the most respected of the trilogy, The Matrix  "largely interprets Plato's Allegory of the Cave. Imagine a cave. Inside are people who were born and have spent their entire lives there, chained into a fixed position, only able to see the wall in front of them. As far as they know, this is the entire world." The Wachowskis ask the same question Plato does: "How do we know what our reality really is?"

When they have Morpheus bring Neo out of his "cave" of everyday late-20th-century existence, they do it in a manner analogous to Plato's Analogy of the Sun, in which "the sun is a metaphor for the nature of reality and knowledge concerning it," and the eyes of the fearful few forced out of their cave need some time to adjust to it.

Based in Seoul,  Colin Marshall  writes and broadcasts on cities a nd culture. He’s at work on a book about Los Angeles,  A Los Angeles Primer , the video series  The City in Cinema ,   the crowdfunded journalism project  Where Is the City of the Future? , and the  Los Angeles Review of Books’  Korea Blog .   Follow him on Twitter at  @colinmarshall  or on  Faceboo k .

The philosophy of liberty is not really difficult to understand. However, the principles that it consist of have to be applied to all situations if we are to achieve a peaceful, prosperous and free world.

Taylor Pace is a libertarian and anarcho-capitalist. He works as a respiratory therapist in critical care medicine. He aided in the founding of Young Americans for Liberty at Texas Tech University, serving as the first president. Taylor has also been a member of Liberty on the Rocks, Houston Voluntaryists, and America's Future Foundation.

I was going to transcribe the Philosophy of Liberty and realized I need not, as the following already does that concisely.


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