WEFOUNDElmore Leonard Raylan Givens 3-Book Collection: Pronto, Riding the Rap, Fire in the Hole


Givens is a Deputy U.S. Marshal and initially appeared in the novels Pronto and Riding the Rap . ( Pronto was adapted as a TV movie in 1997 with James LeGros as Givens.) Leonard later penned the short story "Fire in the Hole", [1] which became the basis for the television series Justified starring Timothy Olyphant . In April 2011, Leonard revealed in an interview that the success of Justified had inspired him to begin work on a new novel about the character, with the title Raylan . [2]

Raylan uses several handguns throughout his appearances. In the movie Pronto, Raylan carries a Colt Python revolver with a 6-inch barrel, which fits his "cowboy" personality. On the show Justified , Raylan carries a SIG Sauer P226 for the shooting of Tommy Bucks, which he draws faster despite Bucks using the lighter and faster-drawing Glock 19 . Raylan carries a small customized Colt Officers ACP .45 Handgun during his first case in Harlan and uses this to shoot Boyd Crowder. He then upgrades to a ".45 Glock " (presumably meaning a Glock 21 but the actual pistol shown is a 9mm Glock 17 .)

Raylan Givens was first portrayed by actor James LeGros in a 1997 television adaptation of Pronto . In early 2010, the FX Network premiered the television show Justified starring Timothy Olyphant in the role of Givens.

When Elmore Leonard died in August at age 87, he left behind more than 40 novels, a number of short stories, and one ongoing television show, Justified , which begins its fifth season in January. By most appraisals, he had long since dethroned Raymond Chandler as the greatest of American crime writers. Many critics argued that, if anything, the reference to genre slighted his contributions. Martin Amis described him as “a literary genius,” and “the nearest America has to a national writer.”

Leonard started out writing Westerns in the 1950s and ’60s, but when the market for cowboy dramas began to collapse, he switched to the contemporary crime novel and rarely looked back. Over the years, he honed his spare, dialogue-driven prose to a lethal leanness, and earned a reputation as the “Dickens of Detroit” for frequently setting his tales of cops and robbers (and kidnappers, car bombers, and other desperadoes) in the city where he had lived since childhood.

Leonard’s influence was not limited to the printed page. To date, more than two dozen of his novels and stories have been adapted for film or television—a few of them more than once. The Hollywood Reporter ranked him No. 2 on their 2012 list of “Hollywood’s 25 Most Powerful Authors,” behind Stephen King (who once called Leonard “the great American writer”).

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Givens is a Deputy U.S. Marshal and initially appeared in the novels Pronto and Riding the Rap . ( Pronto was adapted as a TV movie in 1997 with James LeGros as Givens.) Leonard later penned the short story "Fire in the Hole", [1] which became the basis for the television series Justified starring Timothy Olyphant . In April 2011, Leonard revealed in an interview that the success of Justified had inspired him to begin work on a new novel about the character, with the title Raylan . [2]

Raylan uses several handguns throughout his appearances. In the movie Pronto, Raylan carries a Colt Python revolver with a 6-inch barrel, which fits his "cowboy" personality. On the show Justified , Raylan carries a SIG Sauer P226 for the shooting of Tommy Bucks, which he draws faster despite Bucks using the lighter and faster-drawing Glock 19 . Raylan carries a small customized Colt Officers ACP .45 Handgun during his first case in Harlan and uses this to shoot Boyd Crowder. He then upgrades to a ".45 Glock " (presumably meaning a Glock 21 but the actual pistol shown is a 9mm Glock 17 .)

Raylan Givens was first portrayed by actor James LeGros in a 1997 television adaptation of Pronto . In early 2010, the FX Network premiered the television show Justified starring Timothy Olyphant in the role of Givens.

Givens is a Deputy U.S. Marshal and initially appeared in the novels Pronto and Riding the Rap . ( Pronto was adapted as a TV movie in 1997 with James LeGros as Givens.) Leonard later penned the short story "Fire in the Hole", [1] which became the basis for the television series Justified starring Timothy Olyphant . In April 2011, Leonard revealed in an interview that the success of Justified had inspired him to begin work on a new novel about the character, with the title Raylan . [2]

Raylan uses several handguns throughout his appearances. In the movie Pronto, Raylan carries a Colt Python revolver with a 6-inch barrel, which fits his "cowboy" personality. On the show Justified , Raylan carries a SIG Sauer P226 for the shooting of Tommy Bucks, which he draws faster despite Bucks using the lighter and faster-drawing Glock 19 . Raylan carries a small customized Colt Officers ACP .45 Handgun during his first case in Harlan and uses this to shoot Boyd Crowder. He then upgrades to a ".45 Glock " (presumably meaning a Glock 21 but the actual pistol shown is a 9mm Glock 17 .)

Raylan Givens was first portrayed by actor James LeGros in a 1997 television adaptation of Pronto . In early 2010, the FX Network premiered the television show Justified starring Timothy Olyphant in the role of Givens.

When Elmore Leonard died in August at age 87, he left behind more than 40 novels, a number of short stories, and one ongoing television show, Justified , which begins its fifth season in January. By most appraisals, he had long since dethroned Raymond Chandler as the greatest of American crime writers. Many critics argued that, if anything, the reference to genre slighted his contributions. Martin Amis described him as “a literary genius,” and “the nearest America has to a national writer.”

Leonard started out writing Westerns in the 1950s and ’60s, but when the market for cowboy dramas began to collapse, he switched to the contemporary crime novel and rarely looked back. Over the years, he honed his spare, dialogue-driven prose to a lethal leanness, and earned a reputation as the “Dickens of Detroit” for frequently setting his tales of cops and robbers (and kidnappers, car bombers, and other desperadoes) in the city where he had lived since childhood.

Leonard’s influence was not limited to the printed page. To date, more than two dozen of his novels and stories have been adapted for film or television—a few of them more than once. The Hollywood Reporter ranked him No. 2 on their 2012 list of “Hollywood’s 25 Most Powerful Authors,” behind Stephen King (who once called Leonard “the great American writer”).


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