WEFOUNDDusting the Color From Roses: A Billigual Collection of Arabic Poetry


This article incorporates, in modified form, material from the soon-to-be-published Illustrated Guide to Home Forensic Science Experiments .

You’ll need the following items to complete this lab session. (The standard kit for this book will be available from http://www.thehomescientist.com by the time the book is out, and includes the items listed in the first group.)

We’ll begin with the oldest fingerprint development method, dusting. With the exception of using magnetic powers to treat recently-touched paper, dusting is used almost exclusively on nonporous surfaces, and can provide excellent results if it’s done skillfully. If not done skillfully, dusting can easily damage or destroy any latent fingerprints present, as we found out and you probably will, too. In this lab session, we’ll dust various specimens, using dark or light dusting powder as appropriate for the color of the surface. We’ll then do a tape lift to preserve the fingerprints we’ve developed.

This article incorporates, in modified form, material from the soon-to-be-published Illustrated Guide to Home Forensic Science Experiments .

You’ll need the following items to complete this lab session. (The standard kit for this book will be available from http://www.thehomescientist.com by the time the book is out, and includes the items listed in the first group.)

We’ll begin with the oldest fingerprint development method, dusting. With the exception of using magnetic powers to treat recently-touched paper, dusting is used almost exclusively on nonporous surfaces, and can provide excellent results if it’s done skillfully. If not done skillfully, dusting can easily damage or destroy any latent fingerprints present, as we found out and you probably will, too. In this lab session, we’ll dust various specimens, using dark or light dusting powder as appropriate for the color of the surface. We’ll then do a tape lift to preserve the fingerprints we’ve developed.

Have you ever watched a janitor wipe down your desk, a smudge on the floor, and then the table in the break rooms with the same dirty rag? Have you wondered what germs were traveling on that old cloth?

Cross contamination is a hot topic in the food and cleaning industries for good reason. Who would want to eat off a surface that was cleaned with the same cloth that cleaned the grimy bathroom?

If you clean or manage daycare centers, restaurants, medical facilities, fitness centers, or nursing homes, you know that cross contamination is preventable, but requires a little extra care.

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This article incorporates, in modified form, material from the soon-to-be-published Illustrated Guide to Home Forensic Science Experiments .

You’ll need the following items to complete this lab session. (The standard kit for this book will be available from http://www.thehomescientist.com by the time the book is out, and includes the items listed in the first group.)

We’ll begin with the oldest fingerprint development method, dusting. With the exception of using magnetic powers to treat recently-touched paper, dusting is used almost exclusively on nonporous surfaces, and can provide excellent results if it’s done skillfully. If not done skillfully, dusting can easily damage or destroy any latent fingerprints present, as we found out and you probably will, too. In this lab session, we’ll dust various specimens, using dark or light dusting powder as appropriate for the color of the surface. We’ll then do a tape lift to preserve the fingerprints we’ve developed.

Have you ever watched a janitor wipe down your desk, a smudge on the floor, and then the table in the break rooms with the same dirty rag? Have you wondered what germs were traveling on that old cloth?

Cross contamination is a hot topic in the food and cleaning industries for good reason. Who would want to eat off a surface that was cleaned with the same cloth that cleaned the grimy bathroom?

If you clean or manage daycare centers, restaurants, medical facilities, fitness centers, or nursing homes, you know that cross contamination is preventable, but requires a little extra care.


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