WEFOUNDLaughing Boy (Signet Classics)


Для использования нашего нового интерфейса поиска требуется JavaScript. Включите JavaScript в браузере и повторите попытку .

I read an interesting blurb on booktrade.info ‘s website last week about Richard Wright, an author famous for his powerful, controversial and often racially charged novels. Wright died in 1960 before finishing a work in progress called A Father’s Law. Now, 48 years after his death, his daughter is having the story published–even though it ends with the ultimate cliffhanger, e.g. at the protagonist’s black moment. Worse, Wright’s daughter is quoted in the original Rocky Mountain News article as saying the novel’s peculiar and unwieldy, “with some pieces not quite fitting.”

The author of the article, Patti Thorn , suggests we all bury our unfinished works to prevent this sort of humiliating catastrophe from befalling us. Personally, I have plenty of finished works I wouldn’t want others to look at–including some early fluff-ball poetry from my pre-teen years and worse. I’d bury or burn that for sure, along with every single draft of my story preceding my final draft.

Tess Gerritsen left a successful medical practice to write thrillers, and the leap of faith rewarded her. Her first medical thriller, Harvest, was released in hardcover in 1996, and it marked her debut on the New York Times bestseller list. Since then she’s written 10 thrillers, a slew of romantic suspense novels, and a historical, […]

Для использования нашего нового интерфейса поиска требуется JavaScript. Включите JavaScript в браузере и повторите попытку .

I read an interesting blurb on booktrade.info ‘s website last week about Richard Wright, an author famous for his powerful, controversial and often racially charged novels. Wright died in 1960 before finishing a work in progress called A Father’s Law. Now, 48 years after his death, his daughter is having the story published–even though it ends with the ultimate cliffhanger, e.g. at the protagonist’s black moment. Worse, Wright’s daughter is quoted in the original Rocky Mountain News article as saying the novel’s peculiar and unwieldy, “with some pieces not quite fitting.”

The author of the article, Patti Thorn , suggests we all bury our unfinished works to prevent this sort of humiliating catastrophe from befalling us. Personally, I have plenty of finished works I wouldn’t want others to look at–including some early fluff-ball poetry from my pre-teen years and worse. I’d bury or burn that for sure, along with every single draft of my story preceding my final draft.

Tess Gerritsen left a successful medical practice to write thrillers, and the leap of faith rewarded her. Her first medical thriller, Harvest, was released in hardcover in 1996, and it marked her debut on the New York Times bestseller list. Since then she’s written 10 thrillers, a slew of romantic suspense novels, and a historical, […]

Find and compare hundreds of millions of new books, used books, rare books and out of print books from over 100,000 booksellers and 60+ websites worldwide.

Please choose whether or not you want other users to be able to see on your profile that this library is a favorite of yours.

Для использования нашего нового интерфейса поиска требуется JavaScript. Включите JavaScript в браузере и повторите попытку .

I read an interesting blurb on booktrade.info ‘s website last week about Richard Wright, an author famous for his powerful, controversial and often racially charged novels. Wright died in 1960 before finishing a work in progress called A Father’s Law. Now, 48 years after his death, his daughter is having the story published–even though it ends with the ultimate cliffhanger, e.g. at the protagonist’s black moment. Worse, Wright’s daughter is quoted in the original Rocky Mountain News article as saying the novel’s peculiar and unwieldy, “with some pieces not quite fitting.”

The author of the article, Patti Thorn , suggests we all bury our unfinished works to prevent this sort of humiliating catastrophe from befalling us. Personally, I have plenty of finished works I wouldn’t want others to look at–including some early fluff-ball poetry from my pre-teen years and worse. I’d bury or burn that for sure, along with every single draft of my story preceding my final draft.

Tess Gerritsen left a successful medical practice to write thrillers, and the leap of faith rewarded her. Her first medical thriller, Harvest, was released in hardcover in 1996, and it marked her debut on the New York Times bestseller list. Since then she’s written 10 thrillers, a slew of romantic suspense novels, and a historical, […]

Find and compare hundreds of millions of new books, used books, rare books and out of print books from over 100,000 booksellers and 60+ websites worldwide.

Для использования нашего нового интерфейса поиска требуется JavaScript. Включите JavaScript в браузере и повторите попытку .


51qukfSrY8L