WEFOUNDAn Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish Language (Classic Reprint)


Everybody knows that the word democracy is derived from Greek and means the rule of people. If we go to the Etymology Online we find almost no surprises there:

democracy (n.)
1570s, from Middle French démocratie (14c.), from Medieval Latin democratia (13c.), from Greek demokratia “popular government,” from demos “common people,” originally “district” (see demotic), + kratos “rule, strength” (see -cracy).

Though we can see some disturbing hints here that it is not so simple as it seams. It’s not just generic “people”, but “common” people which come from particular “district”.
If we surf the site further down the link, we’ll find that demotic :

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You're currently on {{currently_on}}. However, it looks like you listened to {{listened_to}} on {{device_name}} {{time}}.

Everybody knows that the word democracy is derived from Greek and means the rule of people. If we go to the Etymology Online we find almost no surprises there:

democracy (n.)
1570s, from Middle French démocratie (14c.), from Medieval Latin democratia (13c.), from Greek demokratia “popular government,” from demos “common people,” originally “district” (see demotic), + kratos “rule, strength” (see -cracy).

Though we can see some disturbing hints here that it is not so simple as it seams. It’s not just generic “people”, but “common” people which come from particular “district”.
If we surf the site further down the link, we’ll find that demotic :

Everybody knows that the word democracy is derived from Greek and means the rule of people. If we go to the Etymology Online we find almost no surprises there:

democracy (n.)
1570s, from Middle French démocratie (14c.), from Medieval Latin democratia (13c.), from Greek demokratia “popular government,” from demos “common people,” originally “district” (see demotic), + kratos “rule, strength” (see -cracy).

Though we can see some disturbing hints here that it is not so simple as it seams. It’s not just generic “people”, but “common” people which come from particular “district”.
If we surf the site further down the link, we’ll find that demotic :

You're currently on {{currently_on}}. However, it looks like you listened to {{listened_to}} on {{device_name}} {{time}}.

Everybody knows that the word democracy is derived from Greek and means the rule of people. If we go to the Etymology Online we find almost no surprises there:

democracy (n.)
1570s, from Middle French démocratie (14c.), from Medieval Latin democratia (13c.), from Greek demokratia “popular government,” from demos “common people,” originally “district” (see demotic), + kratos “rule, strength” (see -cracy).

Though we can see some disturbing hints here that it is not so simple as it seams. It’s not just generic “people”, but “common” people which come from particular “district”.
If we surf the site further down the link, we’ll find that demotic :

You're currently on {{currently_on}}. However, it looks like you listened to {{listened_to}} on {{device_name}} {{time}}.

You're currently on {{currently_on}}. However, it looks like you listened to {{listened_to}} on {{device_name}} {{time}}.

Categories: language | Tags: Ancient Egypt , Ancient Greece , Bentley Layton , Christianity , Copt , Coptic , Egypt , Egyptian , emperor , Etymology , Hebrew Bible , Hebrew language , king , Languages , Linguistics , metonymy , Pharaoh , Sahidic | Permalink .

A priest of the Church of England, who is Chaplain of Hertford College, Oxford, and doing Syriac research at Oxford University.

1. The Copts were right that the peh in the Hebrew P-R’-H is pA, which in the Amarna Age implied “the one and only”.


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