WEFOUNDBuilt on Bones 15,000 Years of Urban Life and Death Bloomsbury Sigma


1) Introduction
2) I will not be moved.
3) Here kitty kitty
4) Feed me, Seymour
5) You say you want a Revolution?
6) Three (thousand) is a crowd
7) Frayed tempers and cracked skulls
8) City versus city
9) How the other half dies
10) Used and abused
11) Showing off, ritually
12) Plagues, poxes, and other souvenirs
13) All in it together
14) No one likes a fellow with a social disease
15) When beer is the better choice
16) So why bother?

NHBS Price: £27.99 £34.99 (Save £7.00) $40/€32 approx

NHBS Special Offer Price: £5.99 £9.99 (Save £4.00) $8/€7 approx (ends 31/03/2018)

This is the question driving Brenna Hassett’s “Built on Bones: 15,000 Years of Urban Life and Death.” Hassett, a bioarchaeologist based at London’s Natural History Museum, traces our complicated love affair with cities through the archaeological record, retelling the history of urbanization via our bones. Through subtle telltale marks in ancient bones recovered from around the world, Hassett tells us, we can uncover surprising facts about why we chose cities, and whether or not this choice has benefited us.

So what were the advantages? Mostly, a sedentary lifestyle allowed easier and more predictable access to calories via the agrarian revolution; an increase in nutrition, in turn, led to an increase in fertility among women and a reduced amount of time between pregnancy (the body can take longer to return to fertility if it lacks significant fat stores). Add to this a greater sense of safety, via permanent structures and communal defenses, and it’s easy to see why cities offered strong evolutionary advantages.

But for all the shortcomings, increased poverty and malnutrition, we kept flourishing in cities. Despite its messiness, the city remains a laboratory for improving the quality of life: Squalor and overpopulation may trigger things like epidemics, but such public health problems also demand action. “So many eyes on so many problems will, however grudgingly, slowly force action.” Cities work because they force us to work together.

Using clues from teeth and skeletal remains, an archeologist explores our 15,000-year evolution into city dwellers, from our first settlements to the urban sprawl of the Industrial Age.

Humans and their immediate ancestors were successful hunter-gatherers for hundreds of thousands of years, but in the last fifteen thousand years humans have gone from finding food to farming it, from seasonal camps to sprawling cities, from a few people to hordes. Drawing on her own fieldwork in the Mediterranean, Africa, Asia, and beyond, archeologist Brenna Hassett explores the long history of urbanization through revolutionary changes written into the bones of the people who lived it.

For every major new lifestyle, another way of dying appeared. From the "cradle of civilization" in the ancient Near East to the dawn of agriculture on the American plains, skeletal remains and fossil teeth show evidence of shorter lives, rotten teeth, and growth interrupted. The scarring on human skeletons reveals that getting too close to animals had some terrible consequences, but so did getting too close to too many other people.

Back in 1864, a French historian named Fustel de Coulanges published a book called The Ancient City , in which he argued that urban life began with graveyards. Nomadic peoples found themselves needing ways to care for and memorialize their dead. The social unity of the tribe, the sense of their families, and the force of their religious cults depended at least in part on an enduring feeling for heroic figures from the past and an objective symbol of a people who extend through time. Graveyards gradually grew into temples, and temples gradually flowered into cities.

In other words, for Coulanges, someone like Hobbes was right to insist that death drove the creation of cities. He was wrong, however, to believe that fear of death was the cause. Grief seemed the truer origin of city dwelling. Hobbes thought humanity turned away from nomadic life primarily for military protection, and the archetypal piece of urban architecture would be a defensive wall. Coulanges thought that humanity turned away from nomadic life primarily for religion, and the archetypal piece of urban architecture would be a tomb.

On the whole, modern archaeology has tended to provide support for Coulanges. Something religious always appears when we dig up the ruins of ancient cities, and memorializing the dead always proves to have occupied a major place in the early stages of urban life. Cities are founded on the fact that we die, and it’s bones, all the way down.

16.01.2018  · Built on Bones has 84 ratings and 24 reviews. K.J. said: A paleoarchaeologist writes. This is about the study of human bones and …

Built on Bones: 15, 000 Years of Urban Life and Death ... Built on Bones: 15,000 Years of Urban Life and Death and over one million other books are available for ...

Imagine you are a hunter-gatherer some 15,000 years ago. You've got a choice – carry on foraging, or plant a few seeds and move to one of those new-fangled

1) Introduction
2) I will not be moved.
3) Here kitty kitty
4) Feed me, Seymour
5) You say you want a Revolution?
6) Three (thousand) is a crowd
7) Frayed tempers and cracked skulls
8) City versus city
9) How the other half dies
10) Used and abused
11) Showing off, ritually
12) Plagues, poxes, and other souvenirs
13) All in it together
14) No one likes a fellow with a social disease
15) When beer is the better choice
16) So why bother?

NHBS Price: £27.99 £34.99 (Save £7.00) $40/€32 approx

NHBS Special Offer Price: £5.99 £9.99 (Save £4.00) $8/€7 approx (ends 31/03/2018)

This is the question driving Brenna Hassett’s “Built on Bones: 15,000 Years of Urban Life and Death.” Hassett, a bioarchaeologist based at London’s Natural History Museum, traces our complicated love affair with cities through the archaeological record, retelling the history of urbanization via our bones. Through subtle telltale marks in ancient bones recovered from around the world, Hassett tells us, we can uncover surprising facts about why we chose cities, and whether or not this choice has benefited us.

So what were the advantages? Mostly, a sedentary lifestyle allowed easier and more predictable access to calories via the agrarian revolution; an increase in nutrition, in turn, led to an increase in fertility among women and a reduced amount of time between pregnancy (the body can take longer to return to fertility if it lacks significant fat stores). Add to this a greater sense of safety, via permanent structures and communal defenses, and it’s easy to see why cities offered strong evolutionary advantages.

But for all the shortcomings, increased poverty and malnutrition, we kept flourishing in cities. Despite its messiness, the city remains a laboratory for improving the quality of life: Squalor and overpopulation may trigger things like epidemics, but such public health problems also demand action. “So many eyes on so many problems will, however grudgingly, slowly force action.” Cities work because they force us to work together.

1) Introduction
2) I will not be moved.
3) Here kitty kitty
4) Feed me, Seymour
5) You say you want a Revolution?
6) Three (thousand) is a crowd
7) Frayed tempers and cracked skulls
8) City versus city
9) How the other half dies
10) Used and abused
11) Showing off, ritually
12) Plagues, poxes, and other souvenirs
13) All in it together
14) No one likes a fellow with a social disease
15) When beer is the better choice
16) So why bother?

NHBS Price: £27.99 £34.99 (Save £7.00) $40/€32 approx

NHBS Special Offer Price: £5.99 £9.99 (Save £4.00) $8/€7 approx (ends 31/03/2018)

This is the question driving Brenna Hassett’s “Built on Bones: 15,000 Years of Urban Life and Death.” Hassett, a bioarchaeologist based at London’s Natural History Museum, traces our complicated love affair with cities through the archaeological record, retelling the history of urbanization via our bones. Through subtle telltale marks in ancient bones recovered from around the world, Hassett tells us, we can uncover surprising facts about why we chose cities, and whether or not this choice has benefited us.

So what were the advantages? Mostly, a sedentary lifestyle allowed easier and more predictable access to calories via the agrarian revolution; an increase in nutrition, in turn, led to an increase in fertility among women and a reduced amount of time between pregnancy (the body can take longer to return to fertility if it lacks significant fat stores). Add to this a greater sense of safety, via permanent structures and communal defenses, and it’s easy to see why cities offered strong evolutionary advantages.

But for all the shortcomings, increased poverty and malnutrition, we kept flourishing in cities. Despite its messiness, the city remains a laboratory for improving the quality of life: Squalor and overpopulation may trigger things like epidemics, but such public health problems also demand action. “So many eyes on so many problems will, however grudgingly, slowly force action.” Cities work because they force us to work together.

Using clues from teeth and skeletal remains, an archeologist explores our 15,000-year evolution into city dwellers, from our first settlements to the urban sprawl of the Industrial Age.

Humans and their immediate ancestors were successful hunter-gatherers for hundreds of thousands of years, but in the last fifteen thousand years humans have gone from finding food to farming it, from seasonal camps to sprawling cities, from a few people to hordes. Drawing on her own fieldwork in the Mediterranean, Africa, Asia, and beyond, archeologist Brenna Hassett explores the long history of urbanization through revolutionary changes written into the bones of the people who lived it.

For every major new lifestyle, another way of dying appeared. From the "cradle of civilization" in the ancient Near East to the dawn of agriculture on the American plains, skeletal remains and fossil teeth show evidence of shorter lives, rotten teeth, and growth interrupted. The scarring on human skeletons reveals that getting too close to animals had some terrible consequences, but so did getting too close to too many other people.

1) Introduction
2) I will not be moved.
3) Here kitty kitty
4) Feed me, Seymour
5) You say you want a Revolution?
6) Three (thousand) is a crowd
7) Frayed tempers and cracked skulls
8) City versus city
9) How the other half dies
10) Used and abused
11) Showing off, ritually
12) Plagues, poxes, and other souvenirs
13) All in it together
14) No one likes a fellow with a social disease
15) When beer is the better choice
16) So why bother?

NHBS Price: £27.99 £34.99 (Save £7.00) $40/€32 approx

NHBS Special Offer Price: £5.99 £9.99 (Save £4.00) $8/€7 approx (ends 31/03/2018)

This is the question driving Brenna Hassett’s “Built on Bones: 15,000 Years of Urban Life and Death.” Hassett, a bioarchaeologist based at London’s Natural History Museum, traces our complicated love affair with cities through the archaeological record, retelling the history of urbanization via our bones. Through subtle telltale marks in ancient bones recovered from around the world, Hassett tells us, we can uncover surprising facts about why we chose cities, and whether or not this choice has benefited us.

So what were the advantages? Mostly, a sedentary lifestyle allowed easier and more predictable access to calories via the agrarian revolution; an increase in nutrition, in turn, led to an increase in fertility among women and a reduced amount of time between pregnancy (the body can take longer to return to fertility if it lacks significant fat stores). Add to this a greater sense of safety, via permanent structures and communal defenses, and it’s easy to see why cities offered strong evolutionary advantages.

But for all the shortcomings, increased poverty and malnutrition, we kept flourishing in cities. Despite its messiness, the city remains a laboratory for improving the quality of life: Squalor and overpopulation may trigger things like epidemics, but such public health problems also demand action. “So many eyes on so many problems will, however grudgingly, slowly force action.” Cities work because they force us to work together.

Using clues from teeth and skeletal remains, an archeologist explores our 15,000-year evolution into city dwellers, from our first settlements to the urban sprawl of the Industrial Age.

Humans and their immediate ancestors were successful hunter-gatherers for hundreds of thousands of years, but in the last fifteen thousand years humans have gone from finding food to farming it, from seasonal camps to sprawling cities, from a few people to hordes. Drawing on her own fieldwork in the Mediterranean, Africa, Asia, and beyond, archeologist Brenna Hassett explores the long history of urbanization through revolutionary changes written into the bones of the people who lived it.

For every major new lifestyle, another way of dying appeared. From the "cradle of civilization" in the ancient Near East to the dawn of agriculture on the American plains, skeletal remains and fossil teeth show evidence of shorter lives, rotten teeth, and growth interrupted. The scarring on human skeletons reveals that getting too close to animals had some terrible consequences, but so did getting too close to too many other people.

Back in 1864, a French historian named Fustel de Coulanges published a book called The Ancient City , in which he argued that urban life began with graveyards. Nomadic peoples found themselves needing ways to care for and memorialize their dead. The social unity of the tribe, the sense of their families, and the force of their religious cults depended at least in part on an enduring feeling for heroic figures from the past and an objective symbol of a people who extend through time. Graveyards gradually grew into temples, and temples gradually flowered into cities.

In other words, for Coulanges, someone like Hobbes was right to insist that death drove the creation of cities. He was wrong, however, to believe that fear of death was the cause. Grief seemed the truer origin of city dwelling. Hobbes thought humanity turned away from nomadic life primarily for military protection, and the archetypal piece of urban architecture would be a defensive wall. Coulanges thought that humanity turned away from nomadic life primarily for religion, and the archetypal piece of urban architecture would be a tomb.

On the whole, modern archaeology has tended to provide support for Coulanges. Something religious always appears when we dig up the ruins of ancient cities, and memorializing the dead always proves to have occupied a major place in the early stages of urban life. Cities are founded on the fact that we die, and it’s bones, all the way down.

1) Introduction
2) I will not be moved.
3) Here kitty kitty
4) Feed me, Seymour
5) You say you want a Revolution?
6) Three (thousand) is a crowd
7) Frayed tempers and cracked skulls
8) City versus city
9) How the other half dies
10) Used and abused
11) Showing off, ritually
12) Plagues, poxes, and other souvenirs
13) All in it together
14) No one likes a fellow with a social disease
15) When beer is the better choice
16) So why bother?

NHBS Price: £27.99 £34.99 (Save £7.00) $40/€32 approx

NHBS Special Offer Price: £5.99 £9.99 (Save £4.00) $8/€7 approx (ends 31/03/2018)


51Ag098mb9L