WEFOUNDUs Presidential Inaugural Addresses


It was 5 p.m. at Mount Vernon on April 14, 1789, when Washington received official notification that he had been unanimously selected by the Electoral College to be the nation's first president. The letter had been sent by Senator John Langdon of New Hampshire , the first president pro tempore of the United States Senate , who had presided over the counting of the electoral votes. Washington replied immediately, and set off in the morning two days later, [5] accompanied by David Humphreys and a Mr. Thomson, [6] who was the Messenger appointed by the Senate, that delivered to General Washington the letter containing the news of his election. [7]

Since nearly first light on April 30, 1789, a crowd of people had begun to gather around Washington's home, and at noon they made their way to Federal Hall by way of Queen Street and Great Dock (both now Pearl Street ) and Broad Street . [6] Washington dressed in an American-made dark brown suit with white silk stockings and silver shoe buckles; he also wore a steel-hilted sword and dark red overcoat. [10]

All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.

It was 5 p.m. at Mount Vernon on April 14, 1789, when Washington received official notification that he had been unanimously selected by the Electoral College to be the nation's first president. The letter had been sent by Senator John Langdon of New Hampshire , the first president pro tempore of the United States Senate , who had presided over the counting of the electoral votes. Washington replied immediately, and set off in the morning two days later, [5] accompanied by David Humphreys and a Mr. Thomson, [6] who was the Messenger appointed by the Senate, that delivered to General Washington the letter containing the news of his election. [7]

Since nearly first light on April 30, 1789, a crowd of people had begun to gather around Washington's home, and at noon they made their way to Federal Hall by way of Queen Street and Great Dock (both now Pearl Street ) and Broad Street . [6] Washington dressed in an American-made dark brown suit with white silk stockings and silver shoe buckles; he also wore a steel-hilted sword and dark red overcoat. [10]

It was 5 p.m. at Mount Vernon on April 14, 1789, when Washington received official notification that he had been unanimously selected by the Electoral College to be the nation's first president. The letter had been sent by Senator John Langdon of New Hampshire , the first president pro tempore of the United States Senate , who had presided over the counting of the electoral votes. Washington replied immediately, and set off in the morning two days later, [5] accompanied by David Humphreys and a Mr. Thomson, [6] who was the Messenger appointed by the Senate, that delivered to General Washington the letter containing the news of his election. [7]

Since nearly first light on April 30, 1789, a crowd of people had begun to gather around Washington's home, and at noon they made their way to Federal Hall by way of Queen Street and Great Dock (both now Pearl Street ) and Broad Street . [6] Washington dressed in an American-made dark brown suit with white silk stockings and silver shoe buckles; he also wore a steel-hilted sword and dark red overcoat. [10]

All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.

Transport yourself to Washington, DC on dozens of immersive, first-person adventures. Experience what it’s like to step foot...

Washington, DC offers attractions and activities for every visitor, whether traveling on a budget or looking for added value...

In case you missed it, the nation's capital has officially become a top tier foodie destination with a stream of accolades...

There’s rightly been a lot of attention paid to USA President Trump’s first speech as President at the time of his inauguration. The speech broke with tradition by extending the acrimonious atmosphere of the election campaign into the Presidency. There’s been an instant flurry of analysis, with the Washington Post leading the way with this analysis of words that have not been used in any prior US presidential inauguration speeches. All this, and the sense of major things going on in the world, prompted me to see what I could find myself in the historical speeches and President Trump’s latest addition.

I got the historical texts from the quanteda R package, which includes the inauguration speeches up to 2013 as an example dataset. There are plenty of human-readable alternatives such as this one from the Yale Law School . I grabbed the transcript of Trump’s speech directly from the web and just pasted it into a text document.

“America” featured very prominently in Trump’s address, including the revival of a 1940s “America First” slogan that was aimed at keeping the USA out of the European war against Nazism; but I didn’t realise how prominently “America” was until I’d counted the words. Used 35 times out of 1,455 words, fully one word in 40 of Trump’s was “America” or a variant. But while this was a record, it wasn’t out of the league of precedent; Bill Clinton, George W. Bush and Richard Nixon all had more than 1% of their words as “America” or variant.

It was 5 p.m. at Mount Vernon on April 14, 1789, when Washington received official notification that he had been unanimously selected by the Electoral College to be the nation's first president. The letter had been sent by Senator John Langdon of New Hampshire , the first president pro tempore of the United States Senate , who had presided over the counting of the electoral votes. Washington replied immediately, and set off in the morning two days later, [5] accompanied by David Humphreys and a Mr. Thomson, [6] who was the Messenger appointed by the Senate, that delivered to General Washington the letter containing the news of his election. [7]

Since nearly first light on April 30, 1789, a crowd of people had begun to gather around Washington's home, and at noon they made their way to Federal Hall by way of Queen Street and Great Dock (both now Pearl Street ) and Broad Street . [6] Washington dressed in an American-made dark brown suit with white silk stockings and silver shoe buckles; he also wore a steel-hilted sword and dark red overcoat. [10]

All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.

Transport yourself to Washington, DC on dozens of immersive, first-person adventures. Experience what it’s like to step foot...

Washington, DC offers attractions and activities for every visitor, whether traveling on a budget or looking for added value...

In case you missed it, the nation's capital has officially become a top tier foodie destination with a stream of accolades...


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