WEFOUNDJoseph Brodsky. Small Collection of Works


Joseph Brodsky: Digital Humanities Lab was designed to establish and highlight creative use of the unique resources housed at the Beinecke archive, the Yale Slavic Department’s historical strengths in scholarship on modernist and émigré poetry, and a growing interest on the part of faculty, students, librarians, and staff to work collaboratively on teaching and research. Building from recent experiments in the Digital Humanities at Yale and other research centers, Joseph Brodsky: Digital Humanities Lab was created in hopes of designing a focused project that can serve as a forward-looking model for pedagogic, collaborative, and scholarly work.

Left:  In this project, Jacob Lassin (GSAS ‘19) tagged Brodsky’s oeuvre for parts of speech and made the results accessible to class members on the web.

Ingrid Nordgaard (GSAS ‘20) plotted poet Joseph Brodsky’s mentions of fauna — including fictitious hybrids — over his lifetime.

Joseph Brodsky: Digital Humanities Lab was designed to establish and highlight creative use of the unique resources housed at the Beinecke archive, the Yale Slavic Department’s historical strengths in scholarship on modernist and émigré poetry, and a growing interest on the part of faculty, students, librarians, and staff to work collaboratively on teaching and research. Building from recent experiments in the Digital Humanities at Yale and other research centers, Joseph Brodsky: Digital Humanities Lab was created in hopes of designing a focused project that can serve as a forward-looking model for pedagogic, collaborative, and scholarly work.

Left:  In this project, Jacob Lassin (GSAS ‘19) tagged Brodsky’s oeuvre for parts of speech and made the results accessible to class members on the web.

Ingrid Nordgaard (GSAS ‘20) plotted poet Joseph Brodsky’s mentions of fauna — including fictitious hybrids — over his lifetime.

Your Majesties, Ladies and Gentlemen,

I was born and grew up on the other shore of the Baltic, practically on its opposite grey rustling page. Sometimes on clear days, especially in autumn, standing on a beach somewhere in Kellomaki, a friend would poke his finger north-west across the sheet of water and say: See that blue strip of land? It's Sweden.

He would be joking, of course: because the angle was wrong, because according to the law of optics, a human eye can travel only for something like twenty miles in open space. The space, however, wasn't open.

Nonetheless, it pleases me to think, ladies and gentlemen, that we used to inhale the same air, eat the same fish, get soaked by the same - at times - radioactive rain, swim in the same sea, get bored by the same kind of conifers.


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