WEFOUNDOffline Map Sochi, Russia - CNM


The new settlers coming belonged to various nationalities (mostly Russians, but also Ukrainians, Georgians, Moldovans , Belorussians, Estonians , Letts and Germans) and religious groups, such as Catholics , Lutherans , Gregorian Armenians , Sunni and other Muslims , but the predominant part was Orthodox Christians . The first Orthodox church in Sochi, the St. Michael's Church , was designed by Alexander Kaminsky and constructed in 1874–1891. Its construction was promoted by the Grand Duke Michael Nikolaevich aiming to commemorate the Russian victory in the Caucasian War and sponsored by Savva Mamontov and Count Felix Felixovich Sumarokov-Elston, among others. [3]

Many areas and geographical features of Sochi retained their original names through its entire history. The city itself and its major river were named after the Ubykh tribe Soatshe which was living in the area before 1864. [3] It is believed that the name Adler originates not from German word for "eagle", but from the name of an Adyghe tribe, so as Loo . Dagomys means "cool place" in Adyghean , [14] Tuapse means "two waters", Matsesta – "fiery water", Kudepsta – "oily water", and Shepsi – "waterless". [15]

After the war, the city kept its position as the leading sanatorium and health resort of the Soviet Union. By the 1960s, it was receiving about 500,000 visitors per year, i.e. about four times its population. This motivated the government to expand the city by including the Adler and Lazarevskoye districts. By the 1980s, the number of tourists rose to 5,000,000 per year, including 200,000 foreigners. It decreased dramatically to 300,000 in the 1990s due to the dissolution of the Soviet Union , and partly recovered to about 1,500,000 by the year 2000. [3]

From the Airport
Hyatt Regency Sochi is located approximately 30 kilometres from Sochi International Airport – AER. Aeroexpress  is available from the airport to the Sochi railway station (50 minutes)

By Train
Sochi train station just over two kilometres from the Black Sea and Hyatt Regency Sochi. Transfers are available from the station to the hotel and the average journey takes ten minutes.

The new settlers coming belonged to various nationalities (mostly Russians, but also Ukrainians, Georgians, Moldovans , Belorussians, Estonians , Letts and Germans) and religious groups, such as Catholics , Lutherans , Gregorian Armenians , Sunni and other Muslims , but the predominant part was Orthodox Christians . The first Orthodox church in Sochi, the St. Michael's Church , was designed by Alexander Kaminsky and constructed in 1874–1891. Its construction was promoted by the Grand Duke Michael Nikolaevich aiming to commemorate the Russian victory in the Caucasian War and sponsored by Savva Mamontov and Count Felix Felixovich Sumarokov-Elston, among others. [3]

Many areas and geographical features of Sochi retained their original names through its entire history. The city itself and its major river were named after the Ubykh tribe Soatshe which was living in the area before 1864. [3] It is believed that the name Adler originates not from German word for "eagle", but from the name of an Adyghe tribe, so as Loo . Dagomys means "cool place" in Adyghean , [14] Tuapse means "two waters", Matsesta – "fiery water", Kudepsta – "oily water", and Shepsi – "waterless". [15]

After the war, the city kept its position as the leading sanatorium and health resort of the Soviet Union. By the 1960s, it was receiving about 500,000 visitors per year, i.e. about four times its population. This motivated the government to expand the city by including the Adler and Lazarevskoye districts. By the 1980s, the number of tourists rose to 5,000,000 per year, including 200,000 foreigners. It decreased dramatically to 300,000 in the 1990s due to the dissolution of the Soviet Union , and partly recovered to about 1,500,000 by the year 2000. [3]

From the Airport
Hyatt Regency Sochi is located approximately 30 kilometres from Sochi International Airport – AER. Aeroexpress  is available from the airport to the Sochi railway station (50 minutes)

By Train
Sochi train station just over two kilometres from the Black Sea and Hyatt Regency Sochi. Transfers are available from the station to the hotel and the average journey takes ten minutes.

2 types of maps are attached in application:
1st map: Offline map. You can download it in Wi-fi service area and use without Internet.
2nd Map: Online map. Allows you to search for addresses, save points on the map. Map access is free of charge. Application functions are available:
1. Add any objects to your favorites.
2. Add your own map points (for example, your hotel or your car parking space).
3. Object search by address.
4. Get directions.

The new settlers coming belonged to various nationalities (mostly Russians, but also Ukrainians, Georgians, Moldovans , Belorussians, Estonians , Letts and Germans) and religious groups, such as Catholics , Lutherans , Gregorian Armenians , Sunni and other Muslims , but the predominant part was Orthodox Christians . The first Orthodox church in Sochi, the St. Michael's Church , was designed by Alexander Kaminsky and constructed in 1874–1891. Its construction was promoted by the Grand Duke Michael Nikolaevich aiming to commemorate the Russian victory in the Caucasian War and sponsored by Savva Mamontov and Count Felix Felixovich Sumarokov-Elston, among others. [3]

Many areas and geographical features of Sochi retained their original names through its entire history. The city itself and its major river were named after the Ubykh tribe Soatshe which was living in the area before 1864. [3] It is believed that the name Adler originates not from German word for "eagle", but from the name of an Adyghe tribe, so as Loo . Dagomys means "cool place" in Adyghean , [14] Tuapse means "two waters", Matsesta – "fiery water", Kudepsta – "oily water", and Shepsi – "waterless". [15]

After the war, the city kept its position as the leading sanatorium and health resort of the Soviet Union. By the 1960s, it was receiving about 500,000 visitors per year, i.e. about four times its population. This motivated the government to expand the city by including the Adler and Lazarevskoye districts. By the 1980s, the number of tourists rose to 5,000,000 per year, including 200,000 foreigners. It decreased dramatically to 300,000 in the 1990s due to the dissolution of the Soviet Union , and partly recovered to about 1,500,000 by the year 2000. [3]


71WBVr827fL