WEFOUNDPrintmaking Techniques


Video of Intaglio Printmaking Process -- The lines of the image are incised, or cut, into a metal plate. This can be done with sharp tools, as in engraving, or with acid, as in etching and aquatint. Ink is applied and forced into the incised areas. Ink remaining on the surface is removed, and the plate is ready for printing.

Video of Screenprinting Printmaking Process -- The artist creates a stencil and applies it to a piece of fabric (the screen) stretched over a wooden frame. Ink is pulled across the screen with a squeegee and forced through the openings in the stencil onto a sheet of paper below.

This unit has a 20" x 24" x 1/2" thick base and also includes three stainless steel registration guides and a squeegee. The frame is made of kiln-dried, non-warp wood, with a wooden base and side frame support. Adjustable, cast metal hinge clamps improve production.

Video of Intaglio Printmaking Process -- The lines of the image are incised, or cut, into a metal plate. This can be done with sharp tools, as in engraving, or with acid, as in etching and aquatint. Ink is applied and forced into the incised areas. Ink remaining on the surface is removed, and the plate is ready for printing.

Video of Screenprinting Printmaking Process -- The artist creates a stencil and applies it to a piece of fabric (the screen) stretched over a wooden frame. Ink is pulled across the screen with a squeegee and forced through the openings in the stencil onto a sheet of paper below.

This unit has a 20" x 24" x 1/2" thick base and also includes three stainless steel registration guides and a squeegee. The frame is made of kiln-dried, non-warp wood, with a wooden base and side frame support. Adjustable, cast metal hinge clamps improve production.

The oldest printmaking technique, woodcut involves carving an image into a wooden surface, which is then inked and printed—leaving the carved-out image in negative, as well as occasional traces of the wood’s grain.

A more modern analog to woodcut, linocuts are made using linoleum; the softness of the material allows for cleaner, freer, and more fluid lines.

To create an etching, artists incise (“draw”) a composition onto a wax-coated metal plate, then soak the entire plate in acid. The acid corrodes the exposed lines and leaves the wax intact, so that when the plate is inked and pressed, the paper absorbs the image in reverse. Rembrandt is one of the original masters of this technique.

The image obtained from any printing element. Originally, this was either a metal plate, engraved in intaglio, or a wood block (or metal plate) cut in relief. From the beginning of the nineteenth century, lithographic stones were included, and today screen-printing ads are a further type of printing element. An impression taken planographically from a painted surface may also be termed a print (see: monotype ). BACK TO TOP

In the past, a rigid distinction was observed between prints obtained by manual processes and reproductions obtained by photomechanical methods (see: photographic processes ). This distinction has less value today, because reproductions have been incorporated into artists’ original prints and are therefore not solely produced, as originally intended, for mass production. BACK TO TOP

A print is termed, “original” if the artist of the design has worked on the printing element himself, as opposed to reproductive and interpretative prints which involve the use of an intermediary person to reproduce the design onto the printing element. Original prints are often only produced in small numbers; they may be numbered and signed by the artist. These distinctions between reproductions (which occasionally may also be signed and numbered) and original prints are, however, generalized.

Video of Intaglio Printmaking Process -- The lines of the image are incised, or cut, into a metal plate. This can be done with sharp tools, as in engraving, or with acid, as in etching and aquatint. Ink is applied and forced into the incised areas. Ink remaining on the surface is removed, and the plate is ready for printing.

Video of Screenprinting Printmaking Process -- The artist creates a stencil and applies it to a piece of fabric (the screen) stretched over a wooden frame. Ink is pulled across the screen with a squeegee and forced through the openings in the stencil onto a sheet of paper below.

This unit has a 20" x 24" x 1/2" thick base and also includes three stainless steel registration guides and a squeegee. The frame is made of kiln-dried, non-warp wood, with a wooden base and side frame support. Adjustable, cast metal hinge clamps improve production.

The oldest printmaking technique, woodcut involves carving an image into a wooden surface, which is then inked and printed—leaving the carved-out image in negative, as well as occasional traces of the wood’s grain.

A more modern analog to woodcut, linocuts are made using linoleum; the softness of the material allows for cleaner, freer, and more fluid lines.

To create an etching, artists incise (“draw”) a composition onto a wax-coated metal plate, then soak the entire plate in acid. The acid corrodes the exposed lines and leaves the wax intact, so that when the plate is inked and pressed, the paper absorbs the image in reverse. Rembrandt is one of the original masters of this technique.

Video of Intaglio Printmaking Process -- The lines of the image are incised, or cut, into a metal plate. This can be done with sharp tools, as in engraving, or with acid, as in etching and aquatint. Ink is applied and forced into the incised areas. Ink remaining on the surface is removed, and the plate is ready for printing.

Video of Screenprinting Printmaking Process -- The artist creates a stencil and applies it to a piece of fabric (the screen) stretched over a wooden frame. Ink is pulled across the screen with a squeegee and forced through the openings in the stencil onto a sheet of paper below.

This unit has a 20" x 24" x 1/2" thick base and also includes three stainless steel registration guides and a squeegee. The frame is made of kiln-dried, non-warp wood, with a wooden base and side frame support. Adjustable, cast metal hinge clamps improve production.

The oldest printmaking technique, woodcut involves carving an image into a wooden surface, which is then inked and printed—leaving the carved-out image in negative, as well as occasional traces of the wood’s grain.

A more modern analog to woodcut, linocuts are made using linoleum; the softness of the material allows for cleaner, freer, and more fluid lines.

To create an etching, artists incise (“draw”) a composition onto a wax-coated metal plate, then soak the entire plate in acid. The acid corrodes the exposed lines and leaves the wax intact, so that when the plate is inked and pressed, the paper absorbs the image in reverse. Rembrandt is one of the original masters of this technique.

The image obtained from any printing element. Originally, this was either a metal plate, engraved in intaglio, or a wood block (or metal plate) cut in relief. From the beginning of the nineteenth century, lithographic stones were included, and today screen-printing ads are a further type of printing element. An impression taken planographically from a painted surface may also be termed a print (see: monotype ). BACK TO TOP

In the past, a rigid distinction was observed between prints obtained by manual processes and reproductions obtained by photomechanical methods (see: photographic processes ). This distinction has less value today, because reproductions have been incorporated into artists’ original prints and are therefore not solely produced, as originally intended, for mass production. BACK TO TOP

A print is termed, “original” if the artist of the design has worked on the printing element himself, as opposed to reproductive and interpretative prints which involve the use of an intermediary person to reproduce the design onto the printing element. Original prints are often only produced in small numbers; they may be numbered and signed by the artist. These distinctions between reproductions (which occasionally may also be signed and numbered) and original prints are, however, generalized.

AccessArt shares easy printmaking techniques via the Accessible Printmaking PDF created as a result of a Printmaking Skill Share led by Zeena Shah .

The 14 page, fully illustrated PDF explores four main printmaking techniques (Linoprint, blockprint, monoprint and screenprint) which can be used with all ages/abilities, without the need for expensive or high tech materials or equipment.

Please log in here to access full content. Username Password Remember me Forgot Password   To access all content, I would like to join as… An Individual Creative practitioners, educators, teachers, parents, learners… From £3.50 An Organisation... Schools, Colleges, Arts Organisations: Single and Multi-Users From £42

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Printmaking is a rewarding art activity for kids and is a wonderful way to show cause and effect and, depending on the technique, to create multiple images. The printmaking techniques and art activities included here are monoprinting, muffin tin printing, styrofoam printing, printing with found objects, string and yarn printing, hand prints, and car wheel printing.

This site contains affiliate links, which means that I may get a commission if you decide to purchase anything from suggested companies. I recommend products that I use and love myself or that I think would be a helpful resource for you. Using these affiliate links to make your purchase helps to keep The Artful Parent running. Thank you!

Video of Intaglio Printmaking Process -- The lines of the image are incised, or cut, into a metal plate. This can be done with sharp tools, as in engraving, or with acid, as in etching and aquatint. Ink is applied and forced into the incised areas. Ink remaining on the surface is removed, and the plate is ready for printing.

Video of Screenprinting Printmaking Process -- The artist creates a stencil and applies it to a piece of fabric (the screen) stretched over a wooden frame. Ink is pulled across the screen with a squeegee and forced through the openings in the stencil onto a sheet of paper below.

This unit has a 20" x 24" x 1/2" thick base and also includes three stainless steel registration guides and a squeegee. The frame is made of kiln-dried, non-warp wood, with a wooden base and side frame support. Adjustable, cast metal hinge clamps improve production.

The oldest printmaking technique, woodcut involves carving an image into a wooden surface, which is then inked and printed—leaving the carved-out image in negative, as well as occasional traces of the wood’s grain.

A more modern analog to woodcut, linocuts are made using linoleum; the softness of the material allows for cleaner, freer, and more fluid lines.

To create an etching, artists incise (“draw”) a composition onto a wax-coated metal plate, then soak the entire plate in acid. The acid corrodes the exposed lines and leaves the wax intact, so that when the plate is inked and pressed, the paper absorbs the image in reverse. Rembrandt is one of the original masters of this technique.

The image obtained from any printing element. Originally, this was either a metal plate, engraved in intaglio, or a wood block (or metal plate) cut in relief. From the beginning of the nineteenth century, lithographic stones were included, and today screen-printing ads are a further type of printing element. An impression taken planographically from a painted surface may also be termed a print (see: monotype ). BACK TO TOP

In the past, a rigid distinction was observed between prints obtained by manual processes and reproductions obtained by photomechanical methods (see: photographic processes ). This distinction has less value today, because reproductions have been incorporated into artists’ original prints and are therefore not solely produced, as originally intended, for mass production. BACK TO TOP

A print is termed, “original” if the artist of the design has worked on the printing element himself, as opposed to reproductive and interpretative prints which involve the use of an intermediary person to reproduce the design onto the printing element. Original prints are often only produced in small numbers; they may be numbered and signed by the artist. These distinctions between reproductions (which occasionally may also be signed and numbered) and original prints are, however, generalized.

AccessArt shares easy printmaking techniques via the Accessible Printmaking PDF created as a result of a Printmaking Skill Share led by Zeena Shah .

The 14 page, fully illustrated PDF explores four main printmaking techniques (Linoprint, blockprint, monoprint and screenprint) which can be used with all ages/abilities, without the need for expensive or high tech materials or equipment.

Please log in here to access full content. Username Password Remember me Forgot Password   To access all content, I would like to join as… An Individual Creative practitioners, educators, teachers, parents, learners… From £3.50 An Organisation... Schools, Colleges, Arts Organisations: Single and Multi-Users From £42

Sign up to receive creative inspiration from The Artful Parent (I'll send you a free downloadable weekly planning calendar just for signing up!)

Printmaking is a rewarding art activity for kids and is a wonderful way to show cause and effect and, depending on the technique, to create multiple images. The printmaking techniques and art activities included here are monoprinting, muffin tin printing, styrofoam printing, printing with found objects, string and yarn printing, hand prints, and car wheel printing.

This site contains affiliate links, which means that I may get a commission if you decide to purchase anything from suggested companies. I recommend products that I use and love myself or that I think would be a helpful resource for you. Using these affiliate links to make your purchase helps to keep The Artful Parent running. Thank you!

Sign up to receive creative inspiration from The Artful Parent (I'll send you a free downloadable weekly planning calendar just for signing up!)

Do you remember the Lay’s potato chip commercial, “you can’t eat just one”?  Well, with gelatin printmaking, I bet you can’t make just one print.

Gelatin printmaking is a form of monoprinting, meaning each print you pull is unique. No two prints are the same. The emphasis is on the process of creating and experimenting rather than the final outcome.

Video of Intaglio Printmaking Process -- The lines of the image are incised, or cut, into a metal plate. This can be done with sharp tools, as in engraving, or with acid, as in etching and aquatint. Ink is applied and forced into the incised areas. Ink remaining on the surface is removed, and the plate is ready for printing.

Video of Screenprinting Printmaking Process -- The artist creates a stencil and applies it to a piece of fabric (the screen) stretched over a wooden frame. Ink is pulled across the screen with a squeegee and forced through the openings in the stencil onto a sheet of paper below.

This unit has a 20" x 24" x 1/2" thick base and also includes three stainless steel registration guides and a squeegee. The frame is made of kiln-dried, non-warp wood, with a wooden base and side frame support. Adjustable, cast metal hinge clamps improve production.

The oldest printmaking technique, woodcut involves carving an image into a wooden surface, which is then inked and printed—leaving the carved-out image in negative, as well as occasional traces of the wood’s grain.

A more modern analog to woodcut, linocuts are made using linoleum; the softness of the material allows for cleaner, freer, and more fluid lines.

To create an etching, artists incise (“draw”) a composition onto a wax-coated metal plate, then soak the entire plate in acid. The acid corrodes the exposed lines and leaves the wax intact, so that when the plate is inked and pressed, the paper absorbs the image in reverse. Rembrandt is one of the original masters of this technique.

The image obtained from any printing element. Originally, this was either a metal plate, engraved in intaglio, or a wood block (or metal plate) cut in relief. From the beginning of the nineteenth century, lithographic stones were included, and today screen-printing ads are a further type of printing element. An impression taken planographically from a painted surface may also be termed a print (see: monotype ). BACK TO TOP

In the past, a rigid distinction was observed between prints obtained by manual processes and reproductions obtained by photomechanical methods (see: photographic processes ). This distinction has less value today, because reproductions have been incorporated into artists’ original prints and are therefore not solely produced, as originally intended, for mass production. BACK TO TOP

A print is termed, “original” if the artist of the design has worked on the printing element himself, as opposed to reproductive and interpretative prints which involve the use of an intermediary person to reproduce the design onto the printing element. Original prints are often only produced in small numbers; they may be numbered and signed by the artist. These distinctions between reproductions (which occasionally may also be signed and numbered) and original prints are, however, generalized.

AccessArt shares easy printmaking techniques via the Accessible Printmaking PDF created as a result of a Printmaking Skill Share led by Zeena Shah .

The 14 page, fully illustrated PDF explores four main printmaking techniques (Linoprint, blockprint, monoprint and screenprint) which can be used with all ages/abilities, without the need for expensive or high tech materials or equipment.

Please log in here to access full content. Username Password Remember me Forgot Password   To access all content, I would like to join as… An Individual Creative practitioners, educators, teachers, parents, learners… From £3.50 An Organisation... Schools, Colleges, Arts Organisations: Single and Multi-Users From £42


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