WEFOUNDWorld War 2 War at Sea Pearl Harbor, D-Day, Normandy,WW2, Military History, Naval Battles


The coverage is arranged chronologically, starting with the sinking of the British passenger liner  Athenia  by a German U-boat just hours after war was declared and concluding with Operation Ten-Go, the last desperate attempt by the Japanese to defend Okinawa and the sinking of the  Yamato , the world’s last and biggest super-battleship. Throughout, decisive battles and engagements are fully explored.

Along the way, there is coverage of some of the lesser-known aspects of the conflict. When it comes to unusual and secret weapons, you’ll find out about maiale, X-craft, kaiten, probe the mysteries of asdic, sonar and radar, and discover much, much more.

Fully illustrated throughout with a fascinating mixture of historic photographs, maps, charts and specially-devised diagrams,  World War Two at Sea  is compelling reading and essential reference. Above all, it demonstrates how vital it was for the war at sea to be won as an essential preliminary to the land and air campaigns that brought about final victory.



Watch film of merchant vessel
being hit by torpedo.

This trade blockade inflicted on the German population levels of privation unknown in Britain during the war - not least starvation, which killed just over 88,000 in 1915, rising to more than 293,000 in 1918. This contributed greatly to Germany's eventual collapse in 1918.

By the spring of 1917, Germany's newly introduced policy of unrestricted submarine warfare was sinking one in every four ships coming to Britain. Belatedly and reluctantly, the Royal Navy introduced a convoy system to protect Allied shipping from submarine attacks. The new strategy worked immediately. By 1918, shipping losses at the hands of enemy torpedoes were declining rapidly.

In the beginning of World War II the Royal Navy was still the strongest navy in the world, [1] with the largest number of warships built and with naval bases across the globe. [2] Totalling over 15 battleships and battlecruisers, 7 aircraft carriers, 66 cruisers, 164 destroyers and 66 submarines. [2] In the course of the war the United States Navy grew tremendously as the United States was faced with a two-front war on the seas. [3] By the end of World War II the U.S Navy was larger than any other navy in the world. [4]

The United States Navy grew rapidly during World War II from 1941–45, and played a central role in the Pacific theatre in the war against Japan. It also played a major supporting role, alongside the Royal Navy, in the European war against Germany.

The Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) sought naval superiority in the Pacific by sinking the main American battle fleet at Pearl Harbor, which was built around its battleships. The December 1941 surprise attack on Pearl Harbor did knock out the battle fleet, but it did not touch the aircraft carriers, which became the mainstay of the rebuilt fleet.

The coverage is arranged chronologically, starting with the sinking of the British passenger liner  Athenia  by a German U-boat just hours after war was declared and concluding with Operation Ten-Go, the last desperate attempt by the Japanese to defend Okinawa and the sinking of the  Yamato , the world’s last and biggest super-battleship. Throughout, decisive battles and engagements are fully explored.

Along the way, there is coverage of some of the lesser-known aspects of the conflict. When it comes to unusual and secret weapons, you’ll find out about maiale, X-craft, kaiten, probe the mysteries of asdic, sonar and radar, and discover much, much more.

Fully illustrated throughout with a fascinating mixture of historic photographs, maps, charts and specially-devised diagrams,  World War Two at Sea  is compelling reading and essential reference. Above all, it demonstrates how vital it was for the war at sea to be won as an essential preliminary to the land and air campaigns that brought about final victory.



Watch film of merchant vessel
being hit by torpedo.

This trade blockade inflicted on the German population levels of privation unknown in Britain during the war - not least starvation, which killed just over 88,000 in 1915, rising to more than 293,000 in 1918. This contributed greatly to Germany's eventual collapse in 1918.

By the spring of 1917, Germany's newly introduced policy of unrestricted submarine warfare was sinking one in every four ships coming to Britain. Belatedly and reluctantly, the Royal Navy introduced a convoy system to protect Allied shipping from submarine attacks. The new strategy worked immediately. By 1918, shipping losses at the hands of enemy torpedoes were declining rapidly.

In the beginning of World War II the Royal Navy was still the strongest navy in the world, [1] with the largest number of warships built and with naval bases across the globe. [2] Totalling over 15 battleships and battlecruisers, 7 aircraft carriers, 66 cruisers, 164 destroyers and 66 submarines. [2] In the course of the war the United States Navy grew tremendously as the United States was faced with a two-front war on the seas. [3] By the end of World War II the U.S Navy was larger than any other navy in the world. [4]

The United States Navy grew rapidly during World War II from 1941–45, and played a central role in the Pacific theatre in the war against Japan. It also played a major supporting role, alongside the Royal Navy, in the European war against Germany.

The Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) sought naval superiority in the Pacific by sinking the main American battle fleet at Pearl Harbor, which was built around its battleships. The December 1941 surprise attack on Pearl Harbor did knock out the battle fleet, but it did not touch the aircraft carriers, which became the mainstay of the rebuilt fleet.

In the beginning of World War II the Royal Navy was still the strongest navy in the world, [1] with the largest number of warships built and with naval bases across the globe. [2] Totalling over 15 battleships and battlecruisers, 7 aircraft carriers, 66 cruisers, 164 destroyers and 66 submarines. [2] In the course of the war the United States Navy grew tremendously as the United States was faced with a two-front war on the seas. [3] By the end of World War II the U.S Navy was larger than any other navy in the world. [4]

The United States Navy grew rapidly during World War II from 1941–45, and played a central role in the Pacific theatre in the war against Japan. It also played a major supporting role, alongside the Royal Navy, in the European war against Germany.

The Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) sought naval superiority in the Pacific by sinking the main American battle fleet at Pearl Harbor, which was built around its battleships. The December 1941 surprise attack on Pearl Harbor did knock out the battle fleet, but it did not touch the aircraft carriers, which became the mainstay of the rebuilt fleet.

The coverage is arranged chronologically, starting with the sinking of the British passenger liner  Athenia  by a German U-boat just hours after war was declared and concluding with Operation Ten-Go, the last desperate attempt by the Japanese to defend Okinawa and the sinking of the  Yamato , the world’s last and biggest super-battleship. Throughout, decisive battles and engagements are fully explored.

Along the way, there is coverage of some of the lesser-known aspects of the conflict. When it comes to unusual and secret weapons, you’ll find out about maiale, X-craft, kaiten, probe the mysteries of asdic, sonar and radar, and discover much, much more.

Fully illustrated throughout with a fascinating mixture of historic photographs, maps, charts and specially-devised diagrams,  World War Two at Sea  is compelling reading and essential reference. Above all, it demonstrates how vital it was for the war at sea to be won as an essential preliminary to the land and air campaigns that brought about final victory.



Watch film of merchant vessel
being hit by torpedo.

This trade blockade inflicted on the German population levels of privation unknown in Britain during the war - not least starvation, which killed just over 88,000 in 1915, rising to more than 293,000 in 1918. This contributed greatly to Germany's eventual collapse in 1918.

By the spring of 1917, Germany's newly introduced policy of unrestricted submarine warfare was sinking one in every four ships coming to Britain. Belatedly and reluctantly, the Royal Navy introduced a convoy system to protect Allied shipping from submarine attacks. The new strategy worked immediately. By 1918, shipping losses at the hands of enemy torpedoes were declining rapidly.

The coverage is arranged chronologically, starting with the sinking of the British passenger liner  Athenia  by a German U-boat just hours after war was declared and concluding with Operation Ten-Go, the last desperate attempt by the Japanese to defend Okinawa and the sinking of the  Yamato , the world’s last and biggest super-battleship. Throughout, decisive battles and engagements are fully explored.

Along the way, there is coverage of some of the lesser-known aspects of the conflict. When it comes to unusual and secret weapons, you’ll find out about maiale, X-craft, kaiten, probe the mysteries of asdic, sonar and radar, and discover much, much more.

Fully illustrated throughout with a fascinating mixture of historic photographs, maps, charts and specially-devised diagrams,  World War Two at Sea  is compelling reading and essential reference. Above all, it demonstrates how vital it was for the war at sea to be won as an essential preliminary to the land and air campaigns that brought about final victory.

The coverage is arranged chronologically, starting with the sinking of the British passenger liner  Athenia  by a German U-boat just hours after war was declared and concluding with Operation Ten-Go, the last desperate attempt by the Japanese to defend Okinawa and the sinking of the  Yamato , the world’s last and biggest super-battleship. Throughout, decisive battles and engagements are fully explored.

Along the way, there is coverage of some of the lesser-known aspects of the conflict. When it comes to unusual and secret weapons, you’ll find out about maiale, X-craft, kaiten, probe the mysteries of asdic, sonar and radar, and discover much, much more.

Fully illustrated throughout with a fascinating mixture of historic photographs, maps, charts and specially-devised diagrams,  World War Two at Sea  is compelling reading and essential reference. Above all, it demonstrates how vital it was for the war at sea to be won as an essential preliminary to the land and air campaigns that brought about final victory.



Watch film of merchant vessel
being hit by torpedo.

This trade blockade inflicted on the German population levels of privation unknown in Britain during the war - not least starvation, which killed just over 88,000 in 1915, rising to more than 293,000 in 1918. This contributed greatly to Germany's eventual collapse in 1918.

By the spring of 1917, Germany's newly introduced policy of unrestricted submarine warfare was sinking one in every four ships coming to Britain. Belatedly and reluctantly, the Royal Navy introduced a convoy system to protect Allied shipping from submarine attacks. The new strategy worked immediately. By 1918, shipping losses at the hands of enemy torpedoes were declining rapidly.

In the beginning of World War II the Royal Navy was still the strongest navy in the world, [1] with the largest number of warships built and with naval bases across the globe. [2] Totalling over 15 battleships and battlecruisers, 7 aircraft carriers, 66 cruisers, 164 destroyers and 66 submarines. [2] In the course of the war the United States Navy grew tremendously as the United States was faced with a two-front war on the seas. [3] By the end of World War II the U.S Navy was larger than any other navy in the world. [4]

The United States Navy grew rapidly during World War II from 1941–45, and played a central role in the Pacific theatre in the war against Japan. It also played a major supporting role, alongside the Royal Navy, in the European war against Germany.

The Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) sought naval superiority in the Pacific by sinking the main American battle fleet at Pearl Harbor, which was built around its battleships. The December 1941 surprise attack on Pearl Harbor did knock out the battle fleet, but it did not touch the aircraft carriers, which became the mainstay of the rebuilt fleet.

In the beginning of World War II the Royal Navy was still the strongest navy in the world, [1] with the largest number of warships built and with naval bases across the globe. [2] Totalling over 15 battleships and battlecruisers, 7 aircraft carriers, 66 cruisers, 164 destroyers and 66 submarines. [2] In the course of the war the United States Navy grew tremendously as the United States was faced with a two-front war on the seas. [3] By the end of World War II the U.S Navy was larger than any other navy in the world. [4]

The United States Navy grew rapidly during World War II from 1941–45, and played a central role in the Pacific theatre in the war against Japan. It also played a major supporting role, alongside the Royal Navy, in the European war against Germany.

The Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) sought naval superiority in the Pacific by sinking the main American battle fleet at Pearl Harbor, which was built around its battleships. The December 1941 surprise attack on Pearl Harbor did knock out the battle fleet, but it did not touch the aircraft carriers, which became the mainstay of the rebuilt fleet.

When The First World War broke out in 1914 the British Navy was more powerful than any other in the world. The Germans and the French also had large naval forces and both the Allied and Central powers fought hard to dominate the waterways.


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