WEFOUNDPervasive Computing and the Networked World: Joint International Conference, ICPCA-SWS 2012, Istanbul, Turkey, November 28-30, 2012, Revised Selected Papers Lecture Notes in Computer Science


EPSRC is holding a two-day workshop on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing. The workshop will be highly multidisciplinary as well as bringing together those who are developing platforms and standards with researchers deploying and evaluating in real world environments.

EPSRC is holding a two-day workshop on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing. The workshop will be highly multidisciplinary as well as bringing together those who are developing platforms and standards with researchers deploying and evaluating in real world environments.

In the Balancing Capability exercise, Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing was selected as an area to grow. While this is likely to happen due the increasing economic and social influence of the Internet of Things and related technologies, we believe that some effort is required at this stage to ensure a balanced portfolio of funded research by the end of the delivery plan period.

EPSRC is holding a two-day workshop on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing. The workshop will be highly multidisciplinary as well as bringing together those who are developing platforms and standards with researchers deploying and evaluating in real world environments.

EPSRC is holding a two-day workshop on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing. The workshop will be highly multidisciplinary as well as bringing together those who are developing platforms and standards with researchers deploying and evaluating in real world environments.

In the Balancing Capability exercise, Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing was selected as an area to grow. While this is likely to happen due the increasing economic and social influence of the Internet of Things and related technologies, we believe that some effort is required at this stage to ensure a balanced portfolio of funded research by the end of the delivery plan period.

This paradigm is also described as pervasive computing , [1] ambient intelligence , [2] or "everyware". [3] Each term emphasizes slightly different aspects. When primarily concerning the objects involved, it is also known as physical computing , the Internet of Things , haptic computing , [4] and "things that think". Rather than propose a single definition for ubiquitous computing and for these related terms, a taxonomy of properties for ubiquitous computing has been proposed, from which different kinds or flavors of ubiquitous systems and applications can be described. [5]

Ubiquitous computing touches on a wide range of research topics, including distributed computing , mobile computing , location computing, mobile networking, context-aware computing, sensor networks , human–computer interaction , and artificial intelligence .

At their core, all models of ubiquitous computing share a vision of small, inexpensive, robust networked processing devices, distributed at all scales throughout everyday life and generally turned to distinctly common-place ends. For example, a domestic ubiquitous computing environment might interconnect lighting and environmental controls with personal biometric monitors woven into clothing so that illumination and heating conditions in a room might be modulated, continuously and imperceptibly. Another common scenario posits refrigerators "aware" of their suitably tagged contents, able to both plan a variety of menus from the food actually on hand, and warn users of stale or spoiled food.

Marc Langheinrich is a professor in the Faculty of Informatics at Università della Svizzera Italiana (USI) in Lugano, Switzerland, where he heads the Research Group for Ubiquitous Computing. His main research interest lies at the intersection of privacy and ubiquitous computing. Langheinrich received his PhD in computer science from ETH Zürich.

Steve Hodges leads the Sensors and Devices research group at Microsoft Research Cambridge and is a visiting professor at the School of Computing Science, Newcastle University. His interests broadly fall into two categories: novel electronic devices, and new technologies and techniques for interaction. He has a PhD in robotics and computer vision from Cambridge University.

Robin Kravets is an associate professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and head of the Mobius group, which researches communication issues in all types of networks that are challenged by mobility. Her research focuses on solutions that enable effective power management, connectivity management, data transport, congestion management, location management, routing, and security.

A pervasive game is a video game where the gaming experience is extended out in the real world , [1] or where the fictive world in which the game takes place blends with the physical world. [2] The "It's Alive" mobile games company described pervasive games as "games that surround you", [3] while Montola, Stenros and Waern's book, Pervasive Games defines them as having "one or more salient features that expand the contractual magic circle of play spatially, temporally, or socially." [4] The concept of a " magic circle " draws from the work of Johan Huizinga , who describes the boundaries of play. [5]

The origins of pervasive gaming are related to the concepts of pervasive computing , ubiquitous computing and ubiquitous gaming. [2]

Pervasive games was first defined as "a LARP ( Live action role-playing game ) game that is augmented with computing and communication technology in a way that combines the physical and digital space together". [6] Since then the term has become ambiguous, taking on the following definitions: [2]

EPSRC is holding a two-day workshop on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing. The workshop will be highly multidisciplinary as well as bringing together those who are developing platforms and standards with researchers deploying and evaluating in real world environments.

EPSRC is holding a two-day workshop on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing. The workshop will be highly multidisciplinary as well as bringing together those who are developing platforms and standards with researchers deploying and evaluating in real world environments.

In the Balancing Capability exercise, Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing was selected as an area to grow. While this is likely to happen due the increasing economic and social influence of the Internet of Things and related technologies, we believe that some effort is required at this stage to ensure a balanced portfolio of funded research by the end of the delivery plan period.

This paradigm is also described as pervasive computing , [1] ambient intelligence , [2] or "everyware". [3] Each term emphasizes slightly different aspects. When primarily concerning the objects involved, it is also known as physical computing , the Internet of Things , haptic computing , [4] and "things that think". Rather than propose a single definition for ubiquitous computing and for these related terms, a taxonomy of properties for ubiquitous computing has been proposed, from which different kinds or flavors of ubiquitous systems and applications can be described. [5]

Ubiquitous computing touches on a wide range of research topics, including distributed computing , mobile computing , location computing, mobile networking, context-aware computing, sensor networks , human–computer interaction , and artificial intelligence .

At their core, all models of ubiquitous computing share a vision of small, inexpensive, robust networked processing devices, distributed at all scales throughout everyday life and generally turned to distinctly common-place ends. For example, a domestic ubiquitous computing environment might interconnect lighting and environmental controls with personal biometric monitors woven into clothing so that illumination and heating conditions in a room might be modulated, continuously and imperceptibly. Another common scenario posits refrigerators "aware" of their suitably tagged contents, able to both plan a variety of menus from the food actually on hand, and warn users of stale or spoiled food.

Marc Langheinrich is a professor in the Faculty of Informatics at Università della Svizzera Italiana (USI) in Lugano, Switzerland, where he heads the Research Group for Ubiquitous Computing. His main research interest lies at the intersection of privacy and ubiquitous computing. Langheinrich received his PhD in computer science from ETH Zürich.

Steve Hodges leads the Sensors and Devices research group at Microsoft Research Cambridge and is a visiting professor at the School of Computing Science, Newcastle University. His interests broadly fall into two categories: novel electronic devices, and new technologies and techniques for interaction. He has a PhD in robotics and computer vision from Cambridge University.

Robin Kravets is an associate professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and head of the Mobius group, which researches communication issues in all types of networks that are challenged by mobility. Her research focuses on solutions that enable effective power management, connectivity management, data transport, congestion management, location management, routing, and security.

EPSRC is holding a two-day workshop on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing. The workshop will be highly multidisciplinary as well as bringing together those who are developing platforms and standards with researchers deploying and evaluating in real world environments.

EPSRC is holding a two-day workshop on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing. The workshop will be highly multidisciplinary as well as bringing together those who are developing platforms and standards with researchers deploying and evaluating in real world environments.

In the Balancing Capability exercise, Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing was selected as an area to grow. While this is likely to happen due the increasing economic and social influence of the Internet of Things and related technologies, we believe that some effort is required at this stage to ensure a balanced portfolio of funded research by the end of the delivery plan period.

This paradigm is also described as pervasive computing , [1] ambient intelligence , [2] or "everyware". [3] Each term emphasizes slightly different aspects. When primarily concerning the objects involved, it is also known as physical computing , the Internet of Things , haptic computing , [4] and "things that think". Rather than propose a single definition for ubiquitous computing and for these related terms, a taxonomy of properties for ubiquitous computing has been proposed, from which different kinds or flavors of ubiquitous systems and applications can be described. [5]

Ubiquitous computing touches on a wide range of research topics, including distributed computing , mobile computing , location computing, mobile networking, context-aware computing, sensor networks , human–computer interaction , and artificial intelligence .

At their core, all models of ubiquitous computing share a vision of small, inexpensive, robust networked processing devices, distributed at all scales throughout everyday life and generally turned to distinctly common-place ends. For example, a domestic ubiquitous computing environment might interconnect lighting and environmental controls with personal biometric monitors woven into clothing so that illumination and heating conditions in a room might be modulated, continuously and imperceptibly. Another common scenario posits refrigerators "aware" of their suitably tagged contents, able to both plan a variety of menus from the food actually on hand, and warn users of stale or spoiled food.


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