WEFOUNDMaggie A Girl of the Streets: Includes MLA Style Citations for Scholarly Secondary Sources, Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles and Critical Essays (Squid Ink Classics)


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A very little boy stood upon a heap of gravel for the honor of Rum Alley. He was throwing stones at howling urchins from Devil's Row who were circling madly about the heap and pelting at him.

Howls of renewed wrath went up from Devil's Row throats. Tattered gamins on the right made a furious assault on the gravel heap. On their small, convulsed faces there shone the grins of true assassins. As they charged, they threw stones and cursed in shrill chorus.

The little champion of Rum Alley stumbled precipitately down the other side. His coat had been torn to shreds in a scuffle, and his hat was gone. He had bruises on twenty parts of his body, and blood was dripping from a cut in his head. His wan features wore a look of a tiny, insane demon.

Maggie: A Girl of the Streets is an 1893 novella by American author Stephen Crane (1871–1900). The story centers on Maggie, a young girl from the Bowery who is driven to unfortunate circumstances by poverty and solitude. The work was considered risqué by publishers because of its literary realism and strong themes. Crane – who was 22 years old at the time – financed the book's publication himself, although the original 1893 edition was printed under the pseudonym Johnston Smith. After the success of 1895's The Red Badge of Courage , Maggie was reissued in 1896 with considerable changes and re-writing. The story is followed by George's Mother .

The story opens with Jimmie, at this point a young boy, trying by himself to fight a gang of boys from an opposing neighborhood. He is saved by his friend, Pete, and comes home to his sister Maggie, his toddling brother Tommie, his brutal and drunken father and mother, Mary Johnson. The parents terrify the children until they are shuddering in the corner.

Maggie was published during the time of industrialization . [1] The United States, a country shaped by agriculture in the 19th century, became an industrialized nation in the late 1800s. Moreover, "an unprecedented influx of immigrants contributed to a boom in population," created bigger cities and a new consumer society. By these developments, progress was linked with poverty, illustrating that the majority of the US population was skeptical about the dependency on the fluctuation of global economy. [2]

This character is modeled after Crane himself, using his personal experience upon which "The Open Boat" is based. The correspondent's perspective is the most fully explored among the four main characters in this short story. He is one of four men who have survived a shipwreck. They find themselves on a small dinghy, attempting to reach the shore and hoping to be rescued. The correspondent helps the oiler row the dinghy.

The oiler is named Billie, and he is among the four men who have survived a shipwreck and cling to survival aboard a dinghy. He switches places with the correspondent to row the boat throughout the story. The oiler is familiar with the sea and quite strong, but he dies in his attempt to swim to shore.

The captain of the ruined ship injures his arm in the process of escaping the shipwreck. As a result, he spends much of the story lying in the dinghy, though he directs the other men. When they near the shore, the captain instructs the men about how to reach the shore. Because of his injured arm, he must remain clinging to the boat with his good arm as it nears the shore.

ISBN 10:  0451529987 ISBN 13:  9780451529985
Publisher: Signet, 2006
Softcover

First published in 1893, when Stephen Crane was only twenty-one years old, Maggie is the harrowing tale of a young woman’s fall into prostitution and destitution in New York City’s notorious Bowery slum. In dazzlingly vivid prose and with a sexual candour remarkable for his day, Crane depicts an urban sub-culture awash with alcohol and patrolled by the swaggering gangland “tough.” Presented here with its companion piece George’s Mother and a selection of Crane’s other Bowery stories, this edition of Maggie includes a detailed introduction that places the novel in its social, cultural, and literary contexts.

The appendices provide an unrivalled range of documentary sources covering such topics as religious and civic reform writing, slum fiction, the “new journalism,” and literary realism and naturalism. An up-to-date bibliography of scholarly work on Crane is also included.

“Adrian Hunter’s elegant introduction and judicious selection of essential contextual documents by Crane and his contemporaries make this edition of Maggie wonderfully useful for students, teachers, and interested readers.” — Michael Robertson, The College of New Jersey, author of Stephen Crane, Journalism, and the Making of Modern American Literature

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A very little boy stood upon a heap of gravel for the honor of Rum Alley. He was throwing stones at howling urchins from Devil's Row who were circling madly about the heap and pelting at him.

Howls of renewed wrath went up from Devil's Row throats. Tattered gamins on the right made a furious assault on the gravel heap. On their small, convulsed faces there shone the grins of true assassins. As they charged, they threw stones and cursed in shrill chorus.

The little champion of Rum Alley stumbled precipitately down the other side. His coat had been torn to shreds in a scuffle, and his hat was gone. He had bruises on twenty parts of his body, and blood was dripping from a cut in his head. His wan features wore a look of a tiny, insane demon.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Text Preview More ↓ Continue reading... Open Document

A very little boy stood upon a heap of gravel for the honor of Rum Alley. He was throwing stones at howling urchins from Devil's Row who were circling madly about the heap and pelting at him.

Howls of renewed wrath went up from Devil's Row throats. Tattered gamins on the right made a furious assault on the gravel heap. On their small, convulsed faces there shone the grins of true assassins. As they charged, they threw stones and cursed in shrill chorus.

The little champion of Rum Alley stumbled precipitately down the other side. His coat had been torn to shreds in a scuffle, and his hat was gone. He had bruises on twenty parts of his body, and blood was dripping from a cut in his head. His wan features wore a look of a tiny, insane demon.

Maggie: A Girl of the Streets is an 1893 novella by American author Stephen Crane (1871–1900). The story centers on Maggie, a young girl from the Bowery who is driven to unfortunate circumstances by poverty and solitude. The work was considered risqué by publishers because of its literary realism and strong themes. Crane – who was 22 years old at the time – financed the book's publication himself, although the original 1893 edition was printed under the pseudonym Johnston Smith. After the success of 1895's The Red Badge of Courage , Maggie was reissued in 1896 with considerable changes and re-writing. The story is followed by George's Mother .

The story opens with Jimmie, at this point a young boy, trying by himself to fight a gang of boys from an opposing neighborhood. He is saved by his friend, Pete, and comes home to his sister Maggie, his toddling brother Tommie, his brutal and drunken father and mother, Mary Johnson. The parents terrify the children until they are shuddering in the corner.

Maggie was published during the time of industrialization . [1] The United States, a country shaped by agriculture in the 19th century, became an industrialized nation in the late 1800s. Moreover, "an unprecedented influx of immigrants contributed to a boom in population," created bigger cities and a new consumer society. By these developments, progress was linked with poverty, illustrating that the majority of the US population was skeptical about the dependency on the fluctuation of global economy. [2]

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Text Preview More ↓ Continue reading... Open Document

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Text Preview More ↓ Continue reading... Open Document

A very little boy stood upon a heap of gravel for the honor of Rum Alley. He was throwing stones at howling urchins from Devil's Row who were circling madly about the heap and pelting at him.

Howls of renewed wrath went up from Devil's Row throats. Tattered gamins on the right made a furious assault on the gravel heap. On their small, convulsed faces there shone the grins of true assassins. As they charged, they threw stones and cursed in shrill chorus.

The little champion of Rum Alley stumbled precipitately down the other side. His coat had been torn to shreds in a scuffle, and his hat was gone. He had bruises on twenty parts of his body, and blood was dripping from a cut in his head. His wan features wore a look of a tiny, insane demon.

Maggie: A Girl of the Streets is an 1893 novella by American author Stephen Crane (1871–1900). The story centers on Maggie, a young girl from the Bowery who is driven to unfortunate circumstances by poverty and solitude. The work was considered risqué by publishers because of its literary realism and strong themes. Crane – who was 22 years old at the time – financed the book's publication himself, although the original 1893 edition was printed under the pseudonym Johnston Smith. After the success of 1895's The Red Badge of Courage , Maggie was reissued in 1896 with considerable changes and re-writing. The story is followed by George's Mother .

The story opens with Jimmie, at this point a young boy, trying by himself to fight a gang of boys from an opposing neighborhood. He is saved by his friend, Pete, and comes home to his sister Maggie, his toddling brother Tommie, his brutal and drunken father and mother, Mary Johnson. The parents terrify the children until they are shuddering in the corner.

Maggie was published during the time of industrialization . [1] The United States, a country shaped by agriculture in the 19th century, became an industrialized nation in the late 1800s. Moreover, "an unprecedented influx of immigrants contributed to a boom in population," created bigger cities and a new consumer society. By these developments, progress was linked with poverty, illustrating that the majority of the US population was skeptical about the dependency on the fluctuation of global economy. [2]

This character is modeled after Crane himself, using his personal experience upon which "The Open Boat" is based. The correspondent's perspective is the most fully explored among the four main characters in this short story. He is one of four men who have survived a shipwreck. They find themselves on a small dinghy, attempting to reach the shore and hoping to be rescued. The correspondent helps the oiler row the dinghy.

The oiler is named Billie, and he is among the four men who have survived a shipwreck and cling to survival aboard a dinghy. He switches places with the correspondent to row the boat throughout the story. The oiler is familiar with the sea and quite strong, but he dies in his attempt to swim to shore.

The captain of the ruined ship injures his arm in the process of escaping the shipwreck. As a result, he spends much of the story lying in the dinghy, though he directs the other men. When they near the shore, the captain instructs the men about how to reach the shore. Because of his injured arm, he must remain clinging to the boat with his good arm as it nears the shore.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Text Preview More ↓ Continue reading... Open Document

A very little boy stood upon a heap of gravel for the honor of Rum Alley. He was throwing stones at howling urchins from Devil's Row who were circling madly about the heap and pelting at him.

Howls of renewed wrath went up from Devil's Row throats. Tattered gamins on the right made a furious assault on the gravel heap. On their small, convulsed faces there shone the grins of true assassins. As they charged, they threw stones and cursed in shrill chorus.

The little champion of Rum Alley stumbled precipitately down the other side. His coat had been torn to shreds in a scuffle, and his hat was gone. He had bruises on twenty parts of his body, and blood was dripping from a cut in his head. His wan features wore a look of a tiny, insane demon.

Maggie: A Girl of the Streets is an 1893 novella by American author Stephen Crane (1871–1900). The story centers on Maggie, a young girl from the Bowery who is driven to unfortunate circumstances by poverty and solitude. The work was considered risqué by publishers because of its literary realism and strong themes. Crane – who was 22 years old at the time – financed the book's publication himself, although the original 1893 edition was printed under the pseudonym Johnston Smith. After the success of 1895's The Red Badge of Courage , Maggie was reissued in 1896 with considerable changes and re-writing. The story is followed by George's Mother .

The story opens with Jimmie, at this point a young boy, trying by himself to fight a gang of boys from an opposing neighborhood. He is saved by his friend, Pete, and comes home to his sister Maggie, his toddling brother Tommie, his brutal and drunken father and mother, Mary Johnson. The parents terrify the children until they are shuddering in the corner.

Maggie was published during the time of industrialization . [1] The United States, a country shaped by agriculture in the 19th century, became an industrialized nation in the late 1800s. Moreover, "an unprecedented influx of immigrants contributed to a boom in population," created bigger cities and a new consumer society. By these developments, progress was linked with poverty, illustrating that the majority of the US population was skeptical about the dependency on the fluctuation of global economy. [2]

This character is modeled after Crane himself, using his personal experience upon which "The Open Boat" is based. The correspondent's perspective is the most fully explored among the four main characters in this short story. He is one of four men who have survived a shipwreck. They find themselves on a small dinghy, attempting to reach the shore and hoping to be rescued. The correspondent helps the oiler row the dinghy.

The oiler is named Billie, and he is among the four men who have survived a shipwreck and cling to survival aboard a dinghy. He switches places with the correspondent to row the boat throughout the story. The oiler is familiar with the sea and quite strong, but he dies in his attempt to swim to shore.

The captain of the ruined ship injures his arm in the process of escaping the shipwreck. As a result, he spends much of the story lying in the dinghy, though he directs the other men. When they near the shore, the captain instructs the men about how to reach the shore. Because of his injured arm, he must remain clinging to the boat with his good arm as it nears the shore.

ISBN 10:  0451529987 ISBN 13:  9780451529985
Publisher: Signet, 2006
Softcover


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