WEFOUNDA Knock at the Door


“It can start with a knock on the door one morning. It is the local Indian agent, or the parish priest, or, perhaps, a Mounted Police officer… The officials have arrived and the children must go.”

So began the school experience of many Indigenous children in Canada for more than a hundred years, and so begins the history of residential schools prepared by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada ( TRC ).

Between 2008 and 2015, the TRC provided opportunities for individuals, families, and communities to share their experiences of residential schools and released several reports based on 7,000 Survivor statements and 5 million documents from government, churches, and schools, as well as a solid grounding in secondary sources.

Uploaded by savefanfiction on April 27, 2016

The Bible contains many beautiful portrayals of the Lord, but one of my favorites is Revelation 3:20. In Warner Sallman’s well-known painting of this scene, Jesus stands outside a closed door and His hand is raised to knock. Since there’s no handle on the exterior, the only way Jesus can enter is if someone on the other side opens the door.

Although the biblical context is an illustration of how the rich, self-satisfied Laodicean church excluded Christ, the same principle can also be applied to the way He relates to us as individuals. We all begin life with a door separating us from Him. Because of the sin in our hearts, none of us are naturally drawn to Him (Eph. 4:17-19). But Jesus takes the initiative by coming to the door and knocking.

There are only two ways to respond to a knock—ignore it or open the door. I recall a young man telling me he wanted to pursue his own happiness before inviting Jesus in. That’s a dangerous choice because with each refusal to open the door, our heart becomes harder until we’re unable to hear and respond to Christ.

“It can start with a knock on the door one morning. It is the local Indian agent, or the parish priest, or, perhaps, a Mounted Police officer… The officials have arrived and the children must go.”

So began the school experience of many Indigenous children in Canada for more than a hundred years, and so begins the history of residential schools prepared by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada ( TRC ).

Between 2008 and 2015, the TRC provided opportunities for individuals, families, and communities to share their experiences of residential schools and released several reports based on 7,000 Survivor statements and 5 million documents from government, churches, and schools, as well as a solid grounding in secondary sources.

Uploaded by savefanfiction on April 27, 2016

“It can start with a knock on the door one morning. It is the local Indian agent, or the parish priest, or, perhaps, a Mounted Police officer… The officials have arrived and the children must go.”

So began the school experience of many Indigenous children in Canada for more than a hundred years, and so begins the history of residential schools prepared by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada ( TRC ).

Between 2008 and 2015, the TRC provided opportunities for individuals, families, and communities to share their experiences of residential schools and released several reports based on 7,000 Survivor statements and 5 million documents from government, churches, and schools, as well as a solid grounding in secondary sources.


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