WEFOUNDMors Dei: Expansions of the Mind


Part I on IE (Indo-European) in general contains five papers. First, Paolo Di Giovine discusses "Il perfetto indoeuropeo tra endomorfismo ed esomorfismo," showing how the forms of perfect tenses differ in Indo-Iranian, Greek, Latin and later Romance, Germanic, and Celtic.

George E. Dunkel's "Particles and Personal Pronouns: Inclusive *me and Exclusive *we " argues that these two particles, which seem to appear as suffixes in certain pronominal forms, are actually independent particles that appear in other compounds as well. The analysis here is as elegant as the language is polemical.

In "Etymology and History: For a Study of 'Medical Language' in Indo-European," D. R. Langslow outlines a proposal for future work, beginning from the shared vocabulary (including the root of the word 'medicine' itself) and the studies that have been done on medical terminology in the various IE languages. Langslow's bibliography is particularly extensive (4 pages) and will be of interest to scholars in history of medicine as well as linguistics.

Part I on IE (Indo-European) in general contains five papers. First, Paolo Di Giovine discusses "Il perfetto indoeuropeo tra endomorfismo ed esomorfismo," showing how the forms of perfect tenses differ in Indo-Iranian, Greek, Latin and later Romance, Germanic, and Celtic.

George E. Dunkel's "Particles and Personal Pronouns: Inclusive *me and Exclusive *we " argues that these two particles, which seem to appear as suffixes in certain pronominal forms, are actually independent particles that appear in other compounds as well. The analysis here is as elegant as the language is polemical.

In "Etymology and History: For a Study of 'Medical Language' in Indo-European," D. R. Langslow outlines a proposal for future work, beginning from the shared vocabulary (including the root of the word 'medicine' itself) and the studies that have been done on medical terminology in the various IE languages. Langslow's bibliography is particularly extensive (4 pages) and will be of interest to scholars in history of medicine as well as linguistics.

Expanded abbreviations: italics
Unexpanded abbreviations: apostrophe: scl'or'am
Ends of manuscript lines: slanted line: /
Rubrics: {Rubricated text}
Punctuation and Capitalization: Same as manuscript
Litterae Notabiliores : B olded Initials
Illuminated Initials: L arge Bolded Initials

In the right column is a reference for the function of the chants on each leaf. At least one main responsory or antiphon has been identified with its correct use in the Temporale or Sanctorale, and the entirety of the text has been provided, with square [brackets] indicating text not contained on the leaf. Psalm incipits and other phrases that were not crucial to identification of the day, or simply unknown, are not referred to in this column - only positively identifiable antiphons or responsories. In this way the leaf can be connected to its use in the liturgy, even though some chants have not been identified yet.

fol. 1 v
hoc erat in principio a/p u d deum {V} S icut
eni m habet pater vita m in / sem et ipso sic dedit
et filio / vitam habere in sem et ip/so. Hoc. {R}
I n pr inci pio ve


51idM-DgIaL