WEFOUNDPrometheus Fire and Stone #4


Tobin and Ferreyra begin their story by launching far into the future of the shared universe, picking up hundreds of years after the events of Prometheus. The story is intriguing enough, though it hits a bit of a misstep early on with a few pages of pretty blatant and cloddy exposition that is tough to get through. Once you get past that though, the sailing is a bit smoother. It works well enough as an introduction to the saga that is set to play out over the coming months.

Ferreyra’s artwork is perfectly solid and his design work is pretty great. There are, unfortunately, quite a few pages and panels that lack fluidity and energy though. These chunks of the story read a lot more like storyboards than comic panels and it dampens the comic’s energy quite a bit.

However, all things considered, it’s clear that a great deal of craft and research has been put into the creation of this comic. The result is far from perfect, but it’s still a welcome return to a truly interesting universe.

Fire and Stone is a comic book series crossover set in the fictional universe of the Alien vs Predator franchise. It was first published by Dark Horse Comics in the Fall of 2014 and has been completely published. [1]

The main storyline begins after the end of the Prometheus film and continues across different eras, such as that of Aliens , involving different characters from those seen in each film series. The comic series is divided in four mini-series related to each franchise. Each mini-series is composed of four issues. A final, double sized issue that gives closure to the main storyline was also produced. [1]

Because of the ship's limited flight range, the Onager lands on LV-223, a nearby planetoid within the same sector as LV-426. The survivors plan to hold out with the provisions aboard the ship and use a distress beacon to flag down rescue. However, the colonists inadvertently unlock the infested cargo bulkhead, and the concealed xenomorphs emerge, killing some of the survivors. Outmatched and helpless, the survivors are forced to abandon their supplies and flee into the nearby jungle.

I've had some serious issues with the way Dark Horse executed this crossover and the convoluted continuity that's linked the four books. Reading this finale makes me wish all the more than Fire and Stone had been conceived as one cohesive book with one creative. Kelly Sue DeConnick certainly would have been the writer to tackle the whole thing. She gives characters like Elden and Galgo a more human touch than they often showed elsewhere. She also solidifies the general themes of the project - the idea of these characters being trapped in one way or another and seeking the meaning of their existence. That culminates with a very poignant ending.

This issue doesn't provide much in the way of answers to running questions or mysteries driving the book. In a lot of ways, that would be a pointless endeavor. These characters are seeking the truth behind events that we've already seen first hand in the Prometheus movie. That said, there are certain loose threads involving the motivation of the rogue Engineer and other elements that could have been addressed more directly.

The various mini-series were fairly sporadic in terms of visual quality. However, artist Agustin Alessio ends the crossover on the right note. His painterly art not only gives the book a cinematic feel, it hearkens back to H.R. Giger's iconic designs in a way few Alien-related comics have managed. Particularly late in this issue, Alessio's renderings become stunningly Giger-esque. These cinematic qualities more than make up for the fact that lead protagonist Angela is depicted as the spitting image of Lara Croft.

Tobin and Ferreyra begin their story by launching far into the future of the shared universe, picking up hundreds of years after the events of Prometheus. The story is intriguing enough, though it hits a bit of a misstep early on with a few pages of pretty blatant and cloddy exposition that is tough to get through. Once you get past that though, the sailing is a bit smoother. It works well enough as an introduction to the saga that is set to play out over the coming months.

Ferreyra’s artwork is perfectly solid and his design work is pretty great. There are, unfortunately, quite a few pages and panels that lack fluidity and energy though. These chunks of the story read a lot more like storyboards than comic panels and it dampens the comic’s energy quite a bit.

However, all things considered, it’s clear that a great deal of craft and research has been put into the creation of this comic. The result is far from perfect, but it’s still a welcome return to a truly interesting universe.

Tobin and Ferreyra begin their story by launching far into the future of the shared universe, picking up hundreds of years after the events of Prometheus. The story is intriguing enough, though it hits a bit of a misstep early on with a few pages of pretty blatant and cloddy exposition that is tough to get through. Once you get past that though, the sailing is a bit smoother. It works well enough as an introduction to the saga that is set to play out over the coming months.

Ferreyra’s artwork is perfectly solid and his design work is pretty great. There are, unfortunately, quite a few pages and panels that lack fluidity and energy though. These chunks of the story read a lot more like storyboards than comic panels and it dampens the comic’s energy quite a bit.

However, all things considered, it’s clear that a great deal of craft and research has been put into the creation of this comic. The result is far from perfect, but it’s still a welcome return to a truly interesting universe.

Fire and Stone is a comic book series crossover set in the fictional universe of the Alien vs Predator franchise. It was first published by Dark Horse Comics in the Fall of 2014 and has been completely published. [1]

The main storyline begins after the end of the Prometheus film and continues across different eras, such as that of Aliens , involving different characters from those seen in each film series. The comic series is divided in four mini-series related to each franchise. Each mini-series is composed of four issues. A final, double sized issue that gives closure to the main storyline was also produced. [1]

Because of the ship's limited flight range, the Onager lands on LV-223, a nearby planetoid within the same sector as LV-426. The survivors plan to hold out with the provisions aboard the ship and use a distress beacon to flag down rescue. However, the colonists inadvertently unlock the infested cargo bulkhead, and the concealed xenomorphs emerge, killing some of the survivors. Outmatched and helpless, the survivors are forced to abandon their supplies and flee into the nearby jungle.

Tobin and Ferreyra begin their story by launching far into the future of the shared universe, picking up hundreds of years after the events of Prometheus. The story is intriguing enough, though it hits a bit of a misstep early on with a few pages of pretty blatant and cloddy exposition that is tough to get through. Once you get past that though, the sailing is a bit smoother. It works well enough as an introduction to the saga that is set to play out over the coming months.

Ferreyra’s artwork is perfectly solid and his design work is pretty great. There are, unfortunately, quite a few pages and panels that lack fluidity and energy though. These chunks of the story read a lot more like storyboards than comic panels and it dampens the comic’s energy quite a bit.

However, all things considered, it’s clear that a great deal of craft and research has been put into the creation of this comic. The result is far from perfect, but it’s still a welcome return to a truly interesting universe.

Fire and Stone is a comic book series crossover set in the fictional universe of the Alien vs Predator franchise. It was first published by Dark Horse Comics in the Fall of 2014 and has been completely published. [1]

The main storyline begins after the end of the Prometheus film and continues across different eras, such as that of Aliens , involving different characters from those seen in each film series. The comic series is divided in four mini-series related to each franchise. Each mini-series is composed of four issues. A final, double sized issue that gives closure to the main storyline was also produced. [1]

Because of the ship's limited flight range, the Onager lands on LV-223, a nearby planetoid within the same sector as LV-426. The survivors plan to hold out with the provisions aboard the ship and use a distress beacon to flag down rescue. However, the colonists inadvertently unlock the infested cargo bulkhead, and the concealed xenomorphs emerge, killing some of the survivors. Outmatched and helpless, the survivors are forced to abandon their supplies and flee into the nearby jungle.

I've had some serious issues with the way Dark Horse executed this crossover and the convoluted continuity that's linked the four books. Reading this finale makes me wish all the more than Fire and Stone had been conceived as one cohesive book with one creative. Kelly Sue DeConnick certainly would have been the writer to tackle the whole thing. She gives characters like Elden and Galgo a more human touch than they often showed elsewhere. She also solidifies the general themes of the project - the idea of these characters being trapped in one way or another and seeking the meaning of their existence. That culminates with a very poignant ending.

This issue doesn't provide much in the way of answers to running questions or mysteries driving the book. In a lot of ways, that would be a pointless endeavor. These characters are seeking the truth behind events that we've already seen first hand in the Prometheus movie. That said, there are certain loose threads involving the motivation of the rogue Engineer and other elements that could have been addressed more directly.

The various mini-series were fairly sporadic in terms of visual quality. However, artist Agustin Alessio ends the crossover on the right note. His painterly art not only gives the book a cinematic feel, it hearkens back to H.R. Giger's iconic designs in a way few Alien-related comics have managed. Particularly late in this issue, Alessio's renderings become stunningly Giger-esque. These cinematic qualities more than make up for the fact that lead protagonist Angela is depicted as the spitting image of Lara Croft.

Prometheus: Fire and Stone is part of Dark Horse’s four-part crossover project, involving the Aliens , Predator , Aliens vs. Predator (AVP), and Prometheus franchises, and coming before the release of the second Prometheus movie sometime next year (I think).

I must confess that I didn’t like the first Prometheus movie—though director Ridley Scott of course did a technically masterful job (as he always does)—mainly because I didn’t see a need to ‘explain’ where the aliens from Aliens franchise came from. I liked having it as a mystery, and a horror ‘out there,’ versus related to us humans. And to find out that we were created by the “creators” was somehow a let down, made up for only by the fact that once the creators came out of cryofreeze sleep (or whatever) they were horrified at what we’d become, an par with the aliens!

Prometheus: Fire and Stone Issues #1 and #2 take up well after the first Prometheus movie, with a salvage crew returning to Moon 223, from the movie, to find and take back a crashed ship, though, as these things go, the Captain knows a wee bit more than the crew about what exactly they’re looking for. And we readers know even more, since we’ve seen the first Prometheus movie. And, if we haven’t, Tobin does his best to explain what’s going on without spoiling things, or slowing them down. Though even then, having seen the movie, I found myself a little lost. But lost is OK, I guess; it helps add to the horror to come.


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