WEFOUNDAfrican Art Now: Masterpieces from the Jean Pigozzi Collection


Contemporary art in Nigeria is at the cusp of an explosion. Over the last two decades, there has been a paradigm shift in artistic practices in the country and in the embrace of new modes of expression. A new generation of emerging artists adopt a conceptual framework and the tools to use art as a vehicle for cultural expression and social change . Gone are the compartmentalized restrictions of medium specificity and a strict embrace of a mastery of technical skill. Contemporary artists in Nigeria today adopt a hybrid discipline of artistic forms, one where the conceptual threads of their message are articulated, debated, and made paramount. 

Participating Artists: Joseph Eze, Ike Francis, Taiye Idahor, Obinna Makata, Chike Obeagu, Demola Ogunajo, Richardson Ovbiebo, Alafuro Sikoki, Stephen Arueze Ubaka, Bob-Nosa Uwagboe, Uche Uzorka 

AAF African Artists' Foundation
3b Isiola Oyekan close
Off Adeleke Adedoyin Street
Off Kofo Abayomi Street
Victoria Island, Lagos

Contemporary art in Nigeria is at the cusp of an explosion. Over the last two decades, there has been a paradigm shift in artistic practices in the country and in the embrace of new modes of expression. A new generation of emerging artists adopt a conceptual framework and the tools to use art as a vehicle for cultural expression and social change . Gone are the compartmentalized restrictions of medium specificity and a strict embrace of a mastery of technical skill. Contemporary artists in Nigeria today adopt a hybrid discipline of artistic forms, one where the conceptual threads of their message are articulated, debated, and made paramount. 

Participating Artists: Joseph Eze, Ike Francis, Taiye Idahor, Obinna Makata, Chike Obeagu, Demola Ogunajo, Richardson Ovbiebo, Alafuro Sikoki, Stephen Arueze Ubaka, Bob-Nosa Uwagboe, Uche Uzorka 

AAF African Artists' Foundation
3b Isiola Oyekan close
Off Adeleke Adedoyin Street
Off Kofo Abayomi Street
Victoria Island, Lagos

Any discussion of African art begs the question, What is African art? In the West, painting has enjoyed a privileged status both as an object and as the source of critical theory. In Africa, painting was an attribute of the applied arts or a means to decorate surfaces on sculpture, pottery, or architecture, such as on the walls of South African Ndebele homesteads.

Painting has a secure place in settled communities, but sub-Saharan Africa’s history is one of prolonged migrations and complex settlement patterns. Useful objects, such as pots, mats, clothes, stools, headrests, and spiritually important artifacts are portable; paintings and big sculptures are not. Westerners responded positively to civilizations that produced painting and sculpture. On first encountering African cultures, they applied their own values and decided that Africa had little or no “art.” Instead, it had “craft,” material culture objects studied as anthropological artifacts, and “idols” or “fetishes.”

Indigo Arts Gallery showcases the finest international folk and contemporary art. Regular exhibitions feature Haitian paintings, sculpture and vodou flags, Mexican prints and paintings, Nicaraguan "primitivista" paintings, Cuban self-taught artists, Indian folk paintings, West African barbershop signboards and African and Oceanic sculpture.

Indigo Arts Gallery
Crane Arts Building, Suite 104
1400 N. American St.
Philadelphia, PA 19122
Telephone number: 215-765-1041
Fax number: 215-765-1042
Email: CONTACT US
 

All photographs and text Copyright Indigo Arts Gallery, LLC., 1998-2017. Use without permission prohibited. Web hosting and development: Oculeum, LLC

Contemporary art in Nigeria is at the cusp of an explosion. Over the last two decades, there has been a paradigm shift in artistic practices in the country and in the embrace of new modes of expression. A new generation of emerging artists adopt a conceptual framework and the tools to use art as a vehicle for cultural expression and social change . Gone are the compartmentalized restrictions of medium specificity and a strict embrace of a mastery of technical skill. Contemporary artists in Nigeria today adopt a hybrid discipline of artistic forms, one where the conceptual threads of their message are articulated, debated, and made paramount. 

Participating Artists: Joseph Eze, Ike Francis, Taiye Idahor, Obinna Makata, Chike Obeagu, Demola Ogunajo, Richardson Ovbiebo, Alafuro Sikoki, Stephen Arueze Ubaka, Bob-Nosa Uwagboe, Uche Uzorka 

AAF African Artists' Foundation
3b Isiola Oyekan close
Off Adeleke Adedoyin Street
Off Kofo Abayomi Street
Victoria Island, Lagos

Any discussion of African art begs the question, What is African art? In the West, painting has enjoyed a privileged status both as an object and as the source of critical theory. In Africa, painting was an attribute of the applied arts or a means to decorate surfaces on sculpture, pottery, or architecture, such as on the walls of South African Ndebele homesteads.

Painting has a secure place in settled communities, but sub-Saharan Africa’s history is one of prolonged migrations and complex settlement patterns. Useful objects, such as pots, mats, clothes, stools, headrests, and spiritually important artifacts are portable; paintings and big sculptures are not. Westerners responded positively to civilizations that produced painting and sculpture. On first encountering African cultures, they applied their own values and decided that Africa had little or no “art.” Instead, it had “craft,” material culture objects studied as anthropological artifacts, and “idols” or “fetishes.”

Indigo Arts Gallery showcases the finest international folk and contemporary art. Regular exhibitions feature Haitian paintings, sculpture and vodou flags, Mexican prints and paintings, Nicaraguan "primitivista" paintings, Cuban self-taught artists, Indian folk paintings, West African barbershop signboards and African and Oceanic sculpture.

Indigo Arts Gallery
Crane Arts Building, Suite 104
1400 N. American St.
Philadelphia, PA 19122
Telephone number: 215-765-1041
Fax number: 215-765-1042
Email: CONTACT US
 

All photographs and text Copyright Indigo Arts Gallery, LLC., 1998-2017. Use without permission prohibited. Web hosting and development: Oculeum, LLC

National Museum of African Art
950 Independence Avenue, SW
Washington, DC

This exhibition features 100 objects by 28 contemporary African artists representing 15 African countries from the Contemporary African Art Collection of Swiss entrepreneur and photographer Jean Pigozzi. A selection of paintings, photographs, drawings, sculptures, and mixed media and video installations include works by international artists -- such as painter Cheri Samba and photographer Seydou Keita -- as well as many lesser-known, self-taught artists.

This auction is now finished. If you are interested in consigning in future auctions, please contact the specialist department . If you have queries about lots purchased in this auction, please contact customer services .

This auction is now finished. If you are interested in consigning in future auctions, please contact the specialist department . If you have queries about lots purchased in this auction, please contact customer services .

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Contemporary art in Nigeria is at the cusp of an explosion. Over the last two decades, there has been a paradigm shift in artistic practices in the country and in the embrace of new modes of expression. A new generation of emerging artists adopt a conceptual framework and the tools to use art as a vehicle for cultural expression and social change . Gone are the compartmentalized restrictions of medium specificity and a strict embrace of a mastery of technical skill. Contemporary artists in Nigeria today adopt a hybrid discipline of artistic forms, one where the conceptual threads of their message are articulated, debated, and made paramount. 

Participating Artists: Joseph Eze, Ike Francis, Taiye Idahor, Obinna Makata, Chike Obeagu, Demola Ogunajo, Richardson Ovbiebo, Alafuro Sikoki, Stephen Arueze Ubaka, Bob-Nosa Uwagboe, Uche Uzorka 

AAF African Artists' Foundation
3b Isiola Oyekan close
Off Adeleke Adedoyin Street
Off Kofo Abayomi Street
Victoria Island, Lagos

Any discussion of African art begs the question, What is African art? In the West, painting has enjoyed a privileged status both as an object and as the source of critical theory. In Africa, painting was an attribute of the applied arts or a means to decorate surfaces on sculpture, pottery, or architecture, such as on the walls of South African Ndebele homesteads.

Painting has a secure place in settled communities, but sub-Saharan Africa’s history is one of prolonged migrations and complex settlement patterns. Useful objects, such as pots, mats, clothes, stools, headrests, and spiritually important artifacts are portable; paintings and big sculptures are not. Westerners responded positively to civilizations that produced painting and sculpture. On first encountering African cultures, they applied their own values and decided that Africa had little or no “art.” Instead, it had “craft,” material culture objects studied as anthropological artifacts, and “idols” or “fetishes.”

Indigo Arts Gallery showcases the finest international folk and contemporary art. Regular exhibitions feature Haitian paintings, sculpture and vodou flags, Mexican prints and paintings, Nicaraguan "primitivista" paintings, Cuban self-taught artists, Indian folk paintings, West African barbershop signboards and African and Oceanic sculpture.

Indigo Arts Gallery
Crane Arts Building, Suite 104
1400 N. American St.
Philadelphia, PA 19122
Telephone number: 215-765-1041
Fax number: 215-765-1042
Email: CONTACT US
 

All photographs and text Copyright Indigo Arts Gallery, LLC., 1998-2017. Use without permission prohibited. Web hosting and development: Oculeum, LLC

National Museum of African Art
950 Independence Avenue, SW
Washington, DC

This exhibition features 100 objects by 28 contemporary African artists representing 15 African countries from the Contemporary African Art Collection of Swiss entrepreneur and photographer Jean Pigozzi. A selection of paintings, photographs, drawings, sculptures, and mixed media and video installations include works by international artists -- such as painter Cheri Samba and photographer Seydou Keita -- as well as many lesser-known, self-taught artists.

Contemporary art in Nigeria is at the cusp of an explosion. Over the last two decades, there has been a paradigm shift in artistic practices in the country and in the embrace of new modes of expression. A new generation of emerging artists adopt a conceptual framework and the tools to use art as a vehicle for cultural expression and social change . Gone are the compartmentalized restrictions of medium specificity and a strict embrace of a mastery of technical skill. Contemporary artists in Nigeria today adopt a hybrid discipline of artistic forms, one where the conceptual threads of their message are articulated, debated, and made paramount. 

Participating Artists: Joseph Eze, Ike Francis, Taiye Idahor, Obinna Makata, Chike Obeagu, Demola Ogunajo, Richardson Ovbiebo, Alafuro Sikoki, Stephen Arueze Ubaka, Bob-Nosa Uwagboe, Uche Uzorka 

AAF African Artists' Foundation
3b Isiola Oyekan close
Off Adeleke Adedoyin Street
Off Kofo Abayomi Street
Victoria Island, Lagos

Any discussion of African art begs the question, What is African art? In the West, painting has enjoyed a privileged status both as an object and as the source of critical theory. In Africa, painting was an attribute of the applied arts or a means to decorate surfaces on sculpture, pottery, or architecture, such as on the walls of South African Ndebele homesteads.

Painting has a secure place in settled communities, but sub-Saharan Africa’s history is one of prolonged migrations and complex settlement patterns. Useful objects, such as pots, mats, clothes, stools, headrests, and spiritually important artifacts are portable; paintings and big sculptures are not. Westerners responded positively to civilizations that produced painting and sculpture. On first encountering African cultures, they applied their own values and decided that Africa had little or no “art.” Instead, it had “craft,” material culture objects studied as anthropological artifacts, and “idols” or “fetishes.”


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