WEFOUNDThe Joyce Maynard Collection: Labor Day, The Good Daughters, and After Her


Still! There are quite a few things wrong with "The Good Daughters," having to do with character, plot, general interest and plausibility. It's the critic's job to say something about those things.

In 1949, in the course of a world-class hurricane, Edwin Plank, a New England farmer and volunteer fireman, sets out to clear a downed tree. He looks forward to getting home in time to make love to his wife, even though she's no erotic picnic. She has a "short, utilitarian body," and she's already thinking her own grumpy thoughts: "Her husband may bother her in bed tonight. She had been hoping the World Series would keep him occupied a while." But Edwin gets sidetracked.

The daughters are criminally slow on the uptake. Ruth's real mother is Val Dickerson; Dana's real mother is Connie Plank, a humorless woman who compulsively reads her Bible and seems always to be putting on pots of beans for everyone to eat, although the Plank family farm grows a vast array of tasty vegetables and, in particular, strawberries, which are reputed to be the best in the neighborhood.

Joyce Maynard’s newest book, “The Best of Us: A Memoir,” about finding and losing her husband, will be published next month by Bloomsbury USA.

Maynard has published novels in a wide range of literary genres, including fiction, young adult fiction , and true crime . Her sixth novel, Labor Day (2009), was adapted into the 2013 film of the same name , directed by Jason Reitman . Her most recent novels include The Good Daughters (2010), After Her (2013) and Under the Influence (2016).

Maynard was born in Durham, New Hampshire , the daughter of Fredelle (née Bruser), a journalist, writer, and English teacher, and Max Maynard, a painter and professor of English. [2] Her father was born in India to English missionary parents and later moved to Canada; her mother was born in Saskatchewan to Jewish immigrants from Russia. [4] [5]

Maynard and Salinger exchanged letters. After her freshman year at Yale, she moved into his house in Cornish, New Hampshire . [2] Salinger and his wife had divorced in 1967. While living with him for ten months, Maynard wrote her first book, a memoir titled Looking Back: A Chronicle of Growing Up Old in the Sixties , which was published in 1973 soon after Maynard and Salinger ended their relationship.

Still! There are quite a few things wrong with "The Good Daughters," having to do with character, plot, general interest and plausibility. It's the critic's job to say something about those things.

In 1949, in the course of a world-class hurricane, Edwin Plank, a New England farmer and volunteer fireman, sets out to clear a downed tree. He looks forward to getting home in time to make love to his wife, even though she's no erotic picnic. She has a "short, utilitarian body," and she's already thinking her own grumpy thoughts: "Her husband may bother her in bed tonight. She had been hoping the World Series would keep him occupied a while." But Edwin gets sidetracked.

The daughters are criminally slow on the uptake. Ruth's real mother is Val Dickerson; Dana's real mother is Connie Plank, a humorless woman who compulsively reads her Bible and seems always to be putting on pots of beans for everyone to eat, although the Plank family farm grows a vast array of tasty vegetables and, in particular, strawberries, which are reputed to be the best in the neighborhood.

Joyce Maynard’s newest book, “The Best of Us: A Memoir,” about finding and losing her husband, will be published next month by Bloomsbury USA.

Still! There are quite a few things wrong with "The Good Daughters," having to do with character, plot, general interest and plausibility. It's the critic's job to say something about those things.

In 1949, in the course of a world-class hurricane, Edwin Plank, a New England farmer and volunteer fireman, sets out to clear a downed tree. He looks forward to getting home in time to make love to his wife, even though she's no erotic picnic. She has a "short, utilitarian body," and she's already thinking her own grumpy thoughts: "Her husband may bother her in bed tonight. She had been hoping the World Series would keep him occupied a while." But Edwin gets sidetracked.

The daughters are criminally slow on the uptake. Ruth's real mother is Val Dickerson; Dana's real mother is Connie Plank, a humorless woman who compulsively reads her Bible and seems always to be putting on pots of beans for everyone to eat, although the Plank family farm grows a vast array of tasty vegetables and, in particular, strawberries, which are reputed to be the best in the neighborhood.

Joyce Maynard’s newest book, “The Best of Us: A Memoir,” about finding and losing her husband, will be published next month by Bloomsbury USA.

Maynard has published novels in a wide range of literary genres, including fiction, young adult fiction , and true crime . Her sixth novel, Labor Day (2009), was adapted into the 2013 film of the same name , directed by Jason Reitman . Her most recent novels include The Good Daughters (2010), After Her (2013) and Under the Influence (2016).

Maynard was born in Durham, New Hampshire , the daughter of Fredelle (née Bruser), a journalist, writer, and English teacher, and Max Maynard, a painter and professor of English. [2] Her father was born in India to English missionary parents and later moved to Canada; her mother was born in Saskatchewan to Jewish immigrants from Russia. [4] [5]

Maynard and Salinger exchanged letters. After her freshman year at Yale, she moved into his house in Cornish, New Hampshire . [2] Salinger and his wife had divorced in 1967. While living with him for ten months, Maynard wrote her first book, a memoir titled Looking Back: A Chronicle of Growing Up Old in the Sixties , which was published in 1973 soon after Maynard and Salinger ended their relationship.

Maynard has published novels in a wide range of literary genres, including fiction, young adult fiction , and true crime . Her sixth novel, Labor Day (2009), was adapted into the 2013 film of the same name , directed by Jason Reitman . Her most recent novels include The Good Daughters (2010), After Her (2013) and Under the Influence (2016).

Maynard was born in Durham, New Hampshire , the daughter of Fredelle (née Bruser), a journalist, writer, and English teacher, and Max Maynard, a painter and professor of English. [1] [2] Her father was born in India to English missionary parents and later moved to Canada; her mother was born in Saskatchewan to Jewish immigrants from Russia. [3] [4] [5]

Maynard and Salinger exchanged letters. After her freshman year at Yale, she moved into his house in Cornish, New Hampshire . [6] [2] Salinger and his wife had divorced in 1967. While living with him for ten months, Maynard wrote her first book, a memoir titled Looking Back: A Chronicle of Growing Up Old in the Sixties , which was published in 1973 soon after Maynard and Salinger ended their relationship.

Still! There are quite a few things wrong with "The Good Daughters," having to do with character, plot, general interest and plausibility. It's the critic's job to say something about those things.

In 1949, in the course of a world-class hurricane, Edwin Plank, a New England farmer and volunteer fireman, sets out to clear a downed tree. He looks forward to getting home in time to make love to his wife, even though she's no erotic picnic. She has a "short, utilitarian body," and she's already thinking her own grumpy thoughts: "Her husband may bother her in bed tonight. She had been hoping the World Series would keep him occupied a while." But Edwin gets sidetracked.

The daughters are criminally slow on the uptake. Ruth's real mother is Val Dickerson; Dana's real mother is Connie Plank, a humorless woman who compulsively reads her Bible and seems always to be putting on pots of beans for everyone to eat, although the Plank family farm grows a vast array of tasty vegetables and, in particular, strawberries, which are reputed to be the best in the neighborhood.

Joyce Maynard’s newest book, “The Best of Us: A Memoir,” about finding and losing her husband, will be published next month by Bloomsbury USA.

Maynard has published novels in a wide range of literary genres, including fiction, young adult fiction , and true crime . Her sixth novel, Labor Day (2009), was adapted into the 2013 film of the same name , directed by Jason Reitman . Her most recent novels include The Good Daughters (2010), After Her (2013) and Under the Influence (2016).

Maynard was born in Durham, New Hampshire , the daughter of Fredelle (née Bruser), a journalist, writer, and English teacher, and Max Maynard, a painter and professor of English. [2] Her father was born in India to English missionary parents and later moved to Canada; her mother was born in Saskatchewan to Jewish immigrants from Russia. [4] [5]

Maynard and Salinger exchanged letters. After her freshman year at Yale, she moved into his house in Cornish, New Hampshire . [2] Salinger and his wife had divorced in 1967. While living with him for ten months, Maynard wrote her first book, a memoir titled Looking Back: A Chronicle of Growing Up Old in the Sixties , which was published in 1973 soon after Maynard and Salinger ended their relationship.

Maynard has published novels in a wide range of literary genres, including fiction, young adult fiction , and true crime . Her sixth novel, Labor Day (2009), was adapted into the 2013 film of the same name , directed by Jason Reitman . Her most recent novels include The Good Daughters (2010), After Her (2013) and Under the Influence (2016).

Maynard was born in Durham, New Hampshire , the daughter of Fredelle (née Bruser), a journalist, writer, and English teacher, and Max Maynard, a painter and professor of English. [1] [2] Her father was born in India to English missionary parents and later moved to Canada; her mother was born in Saskatchewan to Jewish immigrants from Russia. [3] [4] [5]

Maynard and Salinger exchanged letters. After her freshman year at Yale, she moved into his house in Cornish, New Hampshire . [6] [2] Salinger and his wife had divorced in 1967. While living with him for ten months, Maynard wrote her first book, a memoir titled Looking Back: A Chronicle of Growing Up Old in the Sixties , which was published in 1973 soon after Maynard and Salinger ended their relationship.

New York Times bestselling author of Labor Day
With a New Preface

When it was first published in 1998, At Home in the World set off a furor in the literary world and beyond. Joyce Maynard's memoir broke a silence concerning her relationship—at age eighteen—with J.D. Salinger, the famously reclusive author of The Catcher in the Rye, then age fifty-three, who had read a story she wrote for The New York Times in her freshman year of college and sent her a letter that changed her life. Reviewers called her book "shameless" and "powerful" and its author was simultaneously reviled and cheered.

THE HOUSE WHERE I grew up, in Durham, New Hampshire, is the only one on the street with a fence surrounding it. That fit. Our family—my mother, my father, my older sister,...

Joyce Maynard 's essays have appeared in magazines and newspapers for five decades. She is the author of four works of nonfiction and nine novels, including After Her , To Die For, and Labor Day , which was the basis of the 2013 major motion picture of the same name.

Still! There are quite a few things wrong with "The Good Daughters," having to do with character, plot, general interest and plausibility. It's the critic's job to say something about those things.

In 1949, in the course of a world-class hurricane, Edwin Plank, a New England farmer and volunteer fireman, sets out to clear a downed tree. He looks forward to getting home in time to make love to his wife, even though she's no erotic picnic. She has a "short, utilitarian body," and she's already thinking her own grumpy thoughts: "Her husband may bother her in bed tonight. She had been hoping the World Series would keep him occupied a while." But Edwin gets sidetracked.

The daughters are criminally slow on the uptake. Ruth's real mother is Val Dickerson; Dana's real mother is Connie Plank, a humorless woman who compulsively reads her Bible and seems always to be putting on pots of beans for everyone to eat, although the Plank family farm grows a vast array of tasty vegetables and, in particular, strawberries, which are reputed to be the best in the neighborhood.


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