WEFOUNDThe Roxburghe Library of Classics. Member's Edition De Luxe of the International Bibliophile Society, Complete 30 Volume Set


2012 is the 200th anniversary of the event that could be said to mark the start of the modern era of book collecting: the sale of the library of John Ker, 3rd Duke of Roxburghe. The sale of this extensive and masterfully assembled collection attracted the interest of every major book collector in Britain, its praises having lately been sung in Thomas Dibdin’s Bibliomania, or Book-Madness (1809).

Almost 10% of the total selling price of the library was accounted for by the fierce bidding over the Valdarfer Boccaccio (1471), one of only two known copies. It sold (lot 6292) for £2260, a staggering price for a single book, and one not to be exceeded at auction for another 50 years. The book today resides in the John Rylands Library in Manchester, England. Houghton holds several books from the sale, including another Boccaccio, albeit one far more modestly priced (lot 6308).

To celebrate the sale of the Valdarfer Boccaccio, Dibdin held a dinner party on June 16, 1812 for a group of collectors that would become known as the Roxburghe Club . The club, now the oldest bibliophilic society in the world, likewise celebrates its 200th anniversary this year.

Free to the public thanks to the generous support of the NEH , UCSB , Making Publics , UT Dallas , UALR , and UCHRI .

2012 is the 200th anniversary of the event that could be said to mark the start of the modern era of book collecting: the sale of the library of John Ker, 3rd Duke of Roxburghe. The sale of this extensive and masterfully assembled collection attracted the interest of every major book collector in Britain, its praises having lately been sung in Thomas Dibdin’s Bibliomania, or Book-Madness (1809).

Almost 10% of the total selling price of the library was accounted for by the fierce bidding over the Valdarfer Boccaccio (1471), one of only two known copies. It sold (lot 6292) for £2260, a staggering price for a single book, and one not to be exceeded at auction for another 50 years. The book today resides in the John Rylands Library in Manchester, England. Houghton holds several books from the sale, including another Boccaccio, albeit one far more modestly priced (lot 6308).

To celebrate the sale of the Valdarfer Boccaccio, Dibdin held a dinner party on June 16, 1812 for a group of collectors that would become known as the Roxburghe Club . The club, now the oldest bibliophilic society in the world, likewise celebrates its 200th anniversary this year.

Free to the public thanks to the generous support of the NEH , UCSB , Making Publics , UT Dallas , UALR , and UCHRI .

In some parts of the country, £3.25 million is not a lot of money. Take Chiswick, for example – you’d need that much and an extra £100,000 to afford this four-bed semi .

Nice as that house is, it’s not a patch on The Roxburghe, which is on the market via Savills for £3,250,000 . It’s an early-19th century mansion of grand style with 22 bedrooms, five reception rooms and a glass-and-wood entertaining space for which the word ‘conservatory’ doesn’t really seem adequate.

Yet the house – which has been run for many years as a country hotel – is only the start of the tale, for the property also includes almost 300 acres of land on which sits one of Scotland’s finest inland golf courses, The Roxburghe.

2012 is the 200th anniversary of the event that could be said to mark the start of the modern era of book collecting: the sale of the library of John Ker, 3rd Duke of Roxburghe. The sale of this extensive and masterfully assembled collection attracted the interest of every major book collector in Britain, its praises having lately been sung in Thomas Dibdin’s Bibliomania, or Book-Madness (1809).

Almost 10% of the total selling price of the library was accounted for by the fierce bidding over the Valdarfer Boccaccio (1471), one of only two known copies. It sold (lot 6292) for £2260, a staggering price for a single book, and one not to be exceeded at auction for another 50 years. The book today resides in the John Rylands Library in Manchester, England. Houghton holds several books from the sale, including another Boccaccio, albeit one far more modestly priced (lot 6308).

To celebrate the sale of the Valdarfer Boccaccio, Dibdin held a dinner party on June 16, 1812 for a group of collectors that would become known as the Roxburghe Club . The club, now the oldest bibliophilic society in the world, likewise celebrates its 200th anniversary this year.