WEFOUNDCrocodiles Say


Stare into the jaws of a crocodile and it might be the last thing you see. Their formidable jaws can snap our bones like twigs.

Each time a crocodile attacks a person, the media paints a picture of fearsome aggressive beasts that reign terror on unsuspecting victims.

These stories are enough to put you off ever coming close to where they live. But for many people, the risk of being attacked by a crocodile is part of everyday life. Knowing more about the patterns involved in such attacks could save more of us and them.

Stare into the jaws of a crocodile and it might be the last thing you see. Their formidable jaws can snap our bones like twigs.

Each time a crocodile attacks a person, the media paints a picture of fearsome aggressive beasts that reign terror on unsuspecting victims.

These stories are enough to put you off ever coming close to where they live. But for many people, the risk of being attacked by a crocodile is part of everyday life. Knowing more about the patterns involved in such attacks could save more of us and them.

Many people are unaware that there's a difference between alligators and crocodiles and use both terms interchangeably to describe any large water-dwelling lizard with big teeth. What they don't realize is that, despite some similarities, the two reptiles don't look or behave the same. They also belong to different biological families.

Once you understand the differences, it is actually pretty easy to tell them apart. I explore each of these differences in detail below.

The alligator's bite is more powerful because its jaw is specialized for breaking open things like turtle shells, while the crocodile’s snout is more suited to hunting general prey including fish, reptiles, and mammals.

Stare into the jaws of a crocodile and it might be the last thing you see. Their formidable jaws can snap our bones like twigs.

Each time a crocodile attacks a person, the media paints a picture of fearsome aggressive beasts that reign terror on unsuspecting victims.

These stories are enough to put you off ever coming close to where they live. But for many people, the risk of being attacked by a crocodile is part of everyday life. Knowing more about the patterns involved in such attacks could save more of us and them.

Many people are unaware that there's a difference between alligators and crocodiles and use both terms interchangeably to describe any large water-dwelling lizard with big teeth. What they don't realize is that, despite some similarities, the two reptiles don't look or behave the same. They also belong to different biological families.

Once you understand the differences, it is actually pretty easy to tell them apart. I explore each of these differences in detail below.

The alligator's bite is more powerful because its jaw is specialized for breaking open things like turtle shells, while the crocodile’s snout is more suited to hunting general prey including fish, reptiles, and mammals.

As the horrific propaganda of sustainable use of native wildlife continues, and those people pushing it continue to attack me and threaten us, our world's precious wildlife is suffering as a result.

Now for the worst possible news - BUSHMEAT! As a result of established wildlife and conservation organisations backing the sustainable use of wildlife and actually supporting the 'killing' of native wildlife, they have created a market. Third world nations now see examples of modern nations supporting killing, eating and wearing wildlife for money, so now they're doing it. The latest and most horrendous markets created are in Africa, South America and Asia where enforcement of laws is impossible and even though the animals may be protected, the policing agencies have neither the money or power to do anything. So mass wildlife slaughter takes place unchecked.

"Sustainable Use" of native wildlife in so-called modern nations like Australia and the U.S.A. has inadvertently created a multi-million dollar 'bushmeat' industry, where local people kill native wildlife for meat, skins and products. Please don't blame the local people; it's not their fault! They're simply hunting for much needed money. The greatest wildlife perpetrators of today's world are those behind the driving force of "Sustainable Use."


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