WEFOUNDStories From America's Best Comics #11: Classic Comics from the Golden Age


Earlier this week, political leaders in Washington, D.C., launched a plan to ban millionaires from accessing food stamps. It sounded good, as if those More »

Voices of Poverty began in 2011. It was conceived by author and founder Sasha Abramsky, as a part of a project, funded by the Open Society Foundations' Special Fund for Poverty Alleviation, to chronicle hardship in 21st century America. More »

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Copyright © 2011, Voices of Poverty. All Rights Reserved.

Earlier this week, political leaders in Washington, D.C., launched a plan to ban millionaires from accessing food stamps. It sounded good, as if those More »

Voices of Poverty began in 2011. It was conceived by author and founder Sasha Abramsky, as a part of a project, funded by the Open Society Foundations' Special Fund for Poverty Alleviation, to chronicle hardship in 21st century America. More »

Press | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Copyright © 2011, Voices of Poverty. All Rights Reserved.

Tales of Two Cities
The Best and Worst of Times in Today’s New York
Edited by John Freeman
Paperback ($20), E-book ($12),
Print + E-book ($25)

Old Demons, New Deities
Twenty-One Short Stories from Tibet
Edited by Tenzin Dickie
Paperback ($18), E-book ($10),
Print + E-book ($24)

“A penetrating multidisciplinary collection attacking today’s social fissures of privilege and inequality [with a] uniformly high quality of contributors. Most address the topic obliquely, avoiding bombast in favor of grounded social narrative or the perspective offered by formative experience… Urgent, worthy reportage from our fractious, volatile social and cultural moment.”
— Kirkus

On the 50th anniversary of the War on Poverty, we  asked  Al Jazeera America readers to weigh in on what poverty means to them and how they would (and do) survive at the federal poverty level. Some readers explained how living in poverty would change their life, while others shared their personal stories of the challenges they face each day.

"I do live on the lowest income [listed by the federal government]. I was middle class, went to college, and worked for years before the surprise outsourcing of my work. Then my own business slowed due to housing loss and health problems, and now I'm caring for relative with cancer. I have now lived on my own, homeless (out of car or couch surfing) for several years. I am 48 years old. I survive by eating a lot of Top Ramen.

"Wishing I was more eloquent with my wording, but here it goes. I live off grid. I supply all of my own needs. I do not receive food stamps or federal assistance. I am getting heath insurance for the first time in a couple decades. I use solar, catchment water and wood for heating. Poverty isn't a bad thing, It just shows you what you really need, not what is to be desired. My motto: 'have what you need and need what you have'." 

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Earlier this week, political leaders in Washington, D.C., launched a plan to ban millionaires from accessing food stamps. It sounded good, as if those More »

Voices of Poverty began in 2011. It was conceived by author and founder Sasha Abramsky, as a part of a project, funded by the Open Society Foundations' Special Fund for Poverty Alleviation, to chronicle hardship in 21st century America. More »

Press | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Copyright © 2011, Voices of Poverty. All Rights Reserved.

Tales of Two Cities
The Best and Worst of Times in Today’s New York
Edited by John Freeman
Paperback ($20), E-book ($12),
Print + E-book ($25)

Old Demons, New Deities
Twenty-One Short Stories from Tibet
Edited by Tenzin Dickie
Paperback ($18), E-book ($10),
Print + E-book ($24)

“A penetrating multidisciplinary collection attacking today’s social fissures of privilege and inequality [with a] uniformly high quality of contributors. Most address the topic obliquely, avoiding bombast in favor of grounded social narrative or the perspective offered by formative experience… Urgent, worthy reportage from our fractious, volatile social and cultural moment.”
— Kirkus

On the 50th anniversary of the War on Poverty, we  asked  Al Jazeera America readers to weigh in on what poverty means to them and how they would (and do) survive at the federal poverty level. Some readers explained how living in poverty would change their life, while others shared their personal stories of the challenges they face each day.

"I do live on the lowest income [listed by the federal government]. I was middle class, went to college, and worked for years before the surprise outsourcing of my work. Then my own business slowed due to housing loss and health problems, and now I'm caring for relative with cancer. I have now lived on my own, homeless (out of car or couch surfing) for several years. I am 48 years old. I survive by eating a lot of Top Ramen.

"Wishing I was more eloquent with my wording, but here it goes. I live off grid. I supply all of my own needs. I do not receive food stamps or federal assistance. I am getting heath insurance for the first time in a couple decades. I use solar, catchment water and wood for heating. Poverty isn't a bad thing, It just shows you what you really need, not what is to be desired. My motto: 'have what you need and need what you have'." 

Earlier this week, political leaders in Washington, D.C., launched a plan to ban millionaires from accessing food stamps. It sounded good, as if those More »

Voices of Poverty began in 2011. It was conceived by author and founder Sasha Abramsky, as a part of a project, funded by the Open Society Foundations' Special Fund for Poverty Alleviation, to chronicle hardship in 21st century America. More »

Press | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Copyright © 2011, Voices of Poverty. All Rights Reserved.

Tales of Two Cities
The Best and Worst of Times in Today’s New York
Edited by John Freeman
Paperback ($20), E-book ($12),
Print + E-book ($25)

Old Demons, New Deities
Twenty-One Short Stories from Tibet
Edited by Tenzin Dickie
Paperback ($18), E-book ($10),
Print + E-book ($24)

“A penetrating multidisciplinary collection attacking today’s social fissures of privilege and inequality [with a] uniformly high quality of contributors. Most address the topic obliquely, avoiding bombast in favor of grounded social narrative or the perspective offered by formative experience… Urgent, worthy reportage from our fractious, volatile social and cultural moment.”
— Kirkus


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