WEFOUNDAIDS to Classical Study: A Manual of Composition and Translation from English Into Latin and Greek, and from Latin and Greek Into English, with ... Translations and Questions (Classic Reprint)


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As the season of cramming and finals approaches, Trojans can get help with a healthy, easily accessible study aid — classical music.

It’s a solution available 24/7 at Classical
 KUSC in Los Angeles or Classical KDFC in San Francisco. Listen either on the radio or live-streamed at kusc.org or kdfc.com. There’s a new version of KUSC’s free app  and one for KDFC to use on mobile devices.

A number of academic studies recently zeroed in on classical music, showing that 
listening benefits the brain, sleep patterns, the immune system and stress levels — all helpful when 
facing those all-important end-of-semester tests.

STANFORD, Calif. - Using brain images of people listening to short symphonies by an obscure 18th-century composer, a research team from the Stanford University School of Medicine has gained valuable insight into how the brain sorts out the chaotic world around it.

The research team showed that music engages the areas of the brain involved with paying attention, making predictions and updating the event in memory. Peak brain activity occurred during a short period of silence between musical movements - when seemingly nothing was happening.

Beyond understanding the process of listening to music, their work has far-reaching implications for how human brains sort out events in general. Their findings are published in the Aug. 2 issue of Neuron .

Please choose whether or not you want other users to be able to see on your profile that this library is a favorite of yours.

Please choose whether or not you want other users to be able to see on your profile that this library is a favorite of yours.

As the season of cramming and finals approaches, Trojans can get help with a healthy, easily accessible study aid — classical music.

It’s a solution available 24/7 at Classical
 KUSC in Los Angeles or Classical KDFC in San Francisco. Listen either on the radio or live-streamed at kusc.org or kdfc.com. There’s a new version of KUSC’s free app  and one for KDFC to use on mobile devices.

A number of academic studies recently zeroed in on classical music, showing that 
listening benefits the brain, sleep patterns, the immune system and stress levels — all helpful when 
facing those all-important end-of-semester tests.


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