WEFOUNDShakespeare and the Classics.


Enter KING HENRY V, GLOUCESTER, BEDFORD, EXETER, WARWICK, WESTMORELAND, and Attendants KING HENRY V Where is my gracious Lord of Canterbury?
EXETER Not here in presence.
KING HENRY V Send for him, good uncle.
WESTMORELAND Shall we call in the ambassador, my liege?
KING HENRY V Not yet, my cousin: we would be resolved,
Before we hear him, of some things of weight
That task our thoughts, concerning us and France.
Enter the ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY, and the BISHOP of ELY

Enter KING HENRY, BEDFORD, and GLOUCESTER KING HENRY V Gloucester, 'tis true that we are in great danger;
The greater therefore should our courage be.
Good morrow, brother Bedford. God Almighty!
There is some soul of goodness in things evil,
Would men observingly distil it out.
For our bad neighbour makes us early stirrers,
Which is both healthful and good husbandry:
Besides, they are our outward consciences,
And preachers to us all, admonishing
That we should dress us fairly for our end.
Thus may we gather honey from the weed,
And make a moral of the devil himself.
Enter ERPINGHAM

Enter the DAUPHIN, ORLEANS, RAMBURES, and others ORLEANS The sun doth gild our armour; up, my lords!
DAUPHIN Montez A cheval! My horse! varlet! laquais! ha!
ORLEANS O brave spirit!
DAUPHIN Via! les eaux et la terre.
ORLEANS Rien puis? L'air et la feu.
DAUPHIN Ciel, cousin Orleans.
Enter Constable

Enter KING HENRY V, GLOUCESTER, BEDFORD, EXETER, WARWICK, WESTMORELAND, and Attendants KING HENRY V Where is my gracious Lord of Canterbury?
EXETER Not here in presence.
KING HENRY V Send for him, good uncle.
WESTMORELAND Shall we call in the ambassador, my liege?
KING HENRY V Not yet, my cousin: we would be resolved,
Before we hear him, of some things of weight
That task our thoughts, concerning us and France.
Enter the ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY, and the BISHOP of ELY

Enter KING HENRY, BEDFORD, and GLOUCESTER KING HENRY V Gloucester, 'tis true that we are in great danger;
The greater therefore should our courage be.
Good morrow, brother Bedford. God Almighty!
There is some soul of goodness in things evil,
Would men observingly distil it out.
For our bad neighbour makes us early stirrers,
Which is both healthful and good husbandry:
Besides, they are our outward consciences,
And preachers to us all, admonishing
That we should dress us fairly for our end.
Thus may we gather honey from the weed,
And make a moral of the devil himself.
Enter ERPINGHAM

Enter the DAUPHIN, ORLEANS, RAMBURES, and others ORLEANS The sun doth gild our armour; up, my lords!
DAUPHIN Montez A cheval! My horse! varlet! laquais! ha!
ORLEANS O brave spirit!
DAUPHIN Via! les eaux et la terre.
ORLEANS Rien puis? L'air et la feu.
DAUPHIN Ciel, cousin Orleans.
Enter Constable

William Shakespeare [3] was born in Stratford-upon-Avon . His exact date of birth is not known—the baptismal record was dated 26 April 1564—but has been traditionally taken to be April 23, 1564, which is also the Feast Day of Saint George , the patron saint of England. He was the first son and the first surviving child in the family; two earlier children, Joan and Margaret, had died early. [4] A market town then of around 2000 residents about 100 miles (160 km) northwest of London, Stratford was a centre for the marketing, distribution, and slaughter of sheep, as well as for hide tanning and wool trading.

Shakespeare's father, prosperous at the time of William's birth, was appointed to several municipal offices and served as an alderman in 1565, culminating in a term as bailiff , the chief magistrate of the town council , in 1568. He fell upon hard times for reasons unclear to history beginning in 1576, when his son, William, was 12. [6] He was prosecuted for unlicensed dealing in wool and usury, and he mortgaged and subsequently lost some lands he had obtained through his wife's inheritance that would have been inherited by his eldest son. After four years of non-attendance at council meetings, he was finally replaced as burgess in 1586.

Before being allowed to perform for the general public, touring playing companies were required to present their play before the town council to be licensed. Players first acted in Stratford in 1568, the year that John Shakespeare was bailiff. [7] Before Shakespeare turned 20, the Stratford town council had paid for at least 18 performances by no fewer than 12 playing companies. [8]

William Shakespeare is one of the most famous authors of all time. 2016 marked the 400th anniversary of his death, his words have inspired and moved people from around the globe for centuries.

How much do we know about Shakespeare’s cultural background and influences and why his works have endured? To get a real sense of how the Bard’s world would have actually looked and felt, renowned Shakespearean academic Professor Jonathan Bate will be exploring the acclaimed collections of the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust. Professor Bate is also the Lead Educator, with Dr Paula Byrne, on the new Literature and Mental Health: Reading for Wellbeing FutureLearn course from Warwick.

Each week, Professor Bate will examine a particular play and a cultural theme alongside a selection of treasures from the Trust’s archives in Stratford-upon-Avon. Weekly learning material will be broken down into six video segments, each examining a variety of artefacts and play extracts. The course will open with an introduction to Shakespeare and his living and working environment, moving onto broader cultural themes and issues examined in his plays and ending with an exploration of his legacy.

Enter KING HENRY V, GLOUCESTER, BEDFORD, EXETER, WARWICK, WESTMORELAND, and Attendants KING HENRY V Where is my gracious Lord of Canterbury?
EXETER Not here in presence.
KING HENRY V Send for him, good uncle.
WESTMORELAND Shall we call in the ambassador, my liege?
KING HENRY V Not yet, my cousin: we would be resolved,
Before we hear him, of some things of weight
That task our thoughts, concerning us and France.
Enter the ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY, and the BISHOP of ELY

Enter KING HENRY, BEDFORD, and GLOUCESTER KING HENRY V Gloucester, 'tis true that we are in great danger;
The greater therefore should our courage be.
Good morrow, brother Bedford. God Almighty!
There is some soul of goodness in things evil,
Would men observingly distil it out.
For our bad neighbour makes us early stirrers,
Which is both healthful and good husbandry:
Besides, they are our outward consciences,
And preachers to us all, admonishing
That we should dress us fairly for our end.
Thus may we gather honey from the weed,
And make a moral of the devil himself.
Enter ERPINGHAM

Enter the DAUPHIN, ORLEANS, RAMBURES, and others ORLEANS The sun doth gild our armour; up, my lords!
DAUPHIN Montez A cheval! My horse! varlet! laquais! ha!
ORLEANS O brave spirit!
DAUPHIN Via! les eaux et la terre.
ORLEANS Rien puis? L'air et la feu.
DAUPHIN Ciel, cousin Orleans.
Enter Constable

William Shakespeare [3] was born in Stratford-upon-Avon . His exact date of birth is not known—the baptismal record was dated 26 April 1564—but has been traditionally taken to be April 23, 1564, which is also the Feast Day of Saint George , the patron saint of England. He was the first son and the first surviving child in the family; two earlier children, Joan and Margaret, had died early. [4] A market town then of around 2000 residents about 100 miles (160 km) northwest of London, Stratford was a centre for the marketing, distribution, and slaughter of sheep, as well as for hide tanning and wool trading.

Shakespeare's father, prosperous at the time of William's birth, was appointed to several municipal offices and served as an alderman in 1565, culminating in a term as bailiff , the chief magistrate of the town council , in 1568. He fell upon hard times for reasons unclear to history beginning in 1576, when his son, William, was 12. [6] He was prosecuted for unlicensed dealing in wool and usury, and he mortgaged and subsequently lost some lands he had obtained through his wife's inheritance that would have been inherited by his eldest son. After four years of non-attendance at council meetings, he was finally replaced as burgess in 1586.

Before being allowed to perform for the general public, touring playing companies were required to present their play before the town council to be licensed. Players first acted in Stratford in 1568, the year that John Shakespeare was bailiff. [7] Before Shakespeare turned 20, the Stratford town council had paid for at least 18 performances by no fewer than 12 playing companies. [8]

William Shakespeare is one of the most famous authors of all time. 2016 marked the 400th anniversary of his death, his words have inspired and moved people from around the globe for centuries.

How much do we know about Shakespeare’s cultural background and influences and why his works have endured? To get a real sense of how the Bard’s world would have actually looked and felt, renowned Shakespearean academic Professor Jonathan Bate will be exploring the acclaimed collections of the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust. Professor Bate is also the Lead Educator, with Dr Paula Byrne, on the new Literature and Mental Health: Reading for Wellbeing FutureLearn course from Warwick.

Each week, Professor Bate will examine a particular play and a cultural theme alongside a selection of treasures from the Trust’s archives in Stratford-upon-Avon. Weekly learning material will be broken down into six video segments, each examining a variety of artefacts and play extracts. The course will open with an introduction to Shakespeare and his living and working environment, moving onto broader cultural themes and issues examined in his plays and ending with an exploration of his legacy.

The University of Warwick will host an international conference on Shakespeare and the Law from 9-11 July 2007 in association with Warwick Law School and The Capital Centre partnership between The University of Warwick and the Royal Shakespeare Company. The conference will provide a unique forum for scholarly discourse between the major humanities disciplines of law, literature and the performing arts. Confirmed speakers include several leading figures in Shakespearean Scholarship, theatre and the field of law and humanities.

We look forward to welcoming you to the University of Warwick for a full programme of scholarly and social events in the summer of 2007.

We invite you to personally participate in the life of the Folger Shakespeare Library by making a tax-deductible donation to the institution.

The Folger is looking for exceptionally qualified individuals who are committed to the mission, vision, and values of our organization. 

Since William Shakespeare lived more than 400 years ago, and many records from that time are lost or never existed in the first place, we don't know everything about his life. For example, we know that he was baptized in Stratford-upon-Avon, 100 miles northwest of London, on April 26, 1564. But we don't know his exact birthdate, which must have been a few days earlier.

Enter KING HENRY V, GLOUCESTER, BEDFORD, EXETER, WARWICK, WESTMORELAND, and Attendants KING HENRY V Where is my gracious Lord of Canterbury?
EXETER Not here in presence.
KING HENRY V Send for him, good uncle.
WESTMORELAND Shall we call in the ambassador, my liege?
KING HENRY V Not yet, my cousin: we would be resolved,
Before we hear him, of some things of weight
That task our thoughts, concerning us and France.
Enter the ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY, and the BISHOP of ELY

Enter KING HENRY, BEDFORD, and GLOUCESTER KING HENRY V Gloucester, 'tis true that we are in great danger;
The greater therefore should our courage be.
Good morrow, brother Bedford. God Almighty!
There is some soul of goodness in things evil,
Would men observingly distil it out.
For our bad neighbour makes us early stirrers,
Which is both healthful and good husbandry:
Besides, they are our outward consciences,
And preachers to us all, admonishing
That we should dress us fairly for our end.
Thus may we gather honey from the weed,
And make a moral of the devil himself.
Enter ERPINGHAM

Enter the DAUPHIN, ORLEANS, RAMBURES, and others ORLEANS The sun doth gild our armour; up, my lords!
DAUPHIN Montez A cheval! My horse! varlet! laquais! ha!
ORLEANS O brave spirit!
DAUPHIN Via! les eaux et la terre.
ORLEANS Rien puis? L'air et la feu.
DAUPHIN Ciel, cousin Orleans.
Enter Constable

William Shakespeare [3] was born in Stratford-upon-Avon . His exact date of birth is not known—the baptismal record was dated 26 April 1564—but has been traditionally taken to be April 23, 1564, which is also the Feast Day of Saint George , the patron saint of England. He was the first son and the first surviving child in the family; two earlier children, Joan and Margaret, had died early. [4] A market town then of around 2000 residents about 100 miles (160 km) northwest of London, Stratford was a centre for the marketing, distribution, and slaughter of sheep, as well as for hide tanning and wool trading.

Shakespeare's father, prosperous at the time of William's birth, was appointed to several municipal offices and served as an alderman in 1565, culminating in a term as bailiff , the chief magistrate of the town council , in 1568. He fell upon hard times for reasons unclear to history beginning in 1576, when his son, William, was 12. [6] He was prosecuted for unlicensed dealing in wool and usury, and he mortgaged and subsequently lost some lands he had obtained through his wife's inheritance that would have been inherited by his eldest son. After four years of non-attendance at council meetings, he was finally replaced as burgess in 1586.

Before being allowed to perform for the general public, touring playing companies were required to present their play before the town council to be licensed. Players first acted in Stratford in 1568, the year that John Shakespeare was bailiff. [7] Before Shakespeare turned 20, the Stratford town council had paid for at least 18 performances by no fewer than 12 playing companies. [8]

Enter KING HENRY V, GLOUCESTER, BEDFORD, EXETER, WARWICK, WESTMORELAND, and Attendants KING HENRY V Where is my gracious Lord of Canterbury?
EXETER Not here in presence.
KING HENRY V Send for him, good uncle.
WESTMORELAND Shall we call in the ambassador, my liege?
KING HENRY V Not yet, my cousin: we would be resolved,
Before we hear him, of some things of weight
That task our thoughts, concerning us and France.
Enter the ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY, and the BISHOP of ELY

Enter KING HENRY, BEDFORD, and GLOUCESTER KING HENRY V Gloucester, 'tis true that we are in great danger;
The greater therefore should our courage be.
Good morrow, brother Bedford. God Almighty!
There is some soul of goodness in things evil,
Would men observingly distil it out.
For our bad neighbour makes us early stirrers,
Which is both healthful and good husbandry:
Besides, they are our outward consciences,
And preachers to us all, admonishing
That we should dress us fairly for our end.
Thus may we gather honey from the weed,
And make a moral of the devil himself.
Enter ERPINGHAM

Enter the DAUPHIN, ORLEANS, RAMBURES, and others ORLEANS The sun doth gild our armour; up, my lords!
DAUPHIN Montez A cheval! My horse! varlet! laquais! ha!
ORLEANS O brave spirit!
DAUPHIN Via! les eaux et la terre.
ORLEANS Rien puis? L'air et la feu.
DAUPHIN Ciel, cousin Orleans.
Enter Constable

William Shakespeare [3] was born in Stratford-upon-Avon . His exact date of birth is not known—the baptismal record was dated 26 April 1564—but has been traditionally taken to be April 23, 1564, which is also the Feast Day of Saint George , the patron saint of England. He was the first son and the first surviving child in the family; two earlier children, Joan and Margaret, had died early. [4] A market town then of around 2000 residents about 100 miles (160 km) northwest of London, Stratford was a centre for the marketing, distribution, and slaughter of sheep, as well as for hide tanning and wool trading.

Shakespeare's father, prosperous at the time of William's birth, was appointed to several municipal offices and served as an alderman in 1565, culminating in a term as bailiff , the chief magistrate of the town council , in 1568. He fell upon hard times for reasons unclear to history beginning in 1576, when his son, William, was 12. [6] He was prosecuted for unlicensed dealing in wool and usury, and he mortgaged and subsequently lost some lands he had obtained through his wife's inheritance that would have been inherited by his eldest son. After four years of non-attendance at council meetings, he was finally replaced as burgess in 1586.

Before being allowed to perform for the general public, touring playing companies were required to present their play before the town council to be licensed. Players first acted in Stratford in 1568, the year that John Shakespeare was bailiff. [7] Before Shakespeare turned 20, the Stratford town council had paid for at least 18 performances by no fewer than 12 playing companies. [8]

William Shakespeare is one of the most famous authors of all time. 2016 marked the 400th anniversary of his death, his words have inspired and moved people from around the globe for centuries.

How much do we know about Shakespeare’s cultural background and influences and why his works have endured? To get a real sense of how the Bard’s world would have actually looked and felt, renowned Shakespearean academic Professor Jonathan Bate will be exploring the acclaimed collections of the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust. Professor Bate is also the Lead Educator, with Dr Paula Byrne, on the new Literature and Mental Health: Reading for Wellbeing FutureLearn course from Warwick.

Each week, Professor Bate will examine a particular play and a cultural theme alongside a selection of treasures from the Trust’s archives in Stratford-upon-Avon. Weekly learning material will be broken down into six video segments, each examining a variety of artefacts and play extracts. The course will open with an introduction to Shakespeare and his living and working environment, moving onto broader cultural themes and issues examined in his plays and ending with an exploration of his legacy.

The University of Warwick will host an international conference on Shakespeare and the Law from 9-11 July 2007 in association with Warwick Law School and The Capital Centre partnership between The University of Warwick and the Royal Shakespeare Company. The conference will provide a unique forum for scholarly discourse between the major humanities disciplines of law, literature and the performing arts. Confirmed speakers include several leading figures in Shakespearean Scholarship, theatre and the field of law and humanities.

We look forward to welcoming you to the University of Warwick for a full programme of scholarly and social events in the summer of 2007.


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