WEFOUNDFear: Short and Gruesome Tales of the Undead


T he Murders In The Rue Morgue by Edgar Allan Poe, considered to be the first modern detective story, was published in the USA on April 20, 1841. In this article, first published in January 2009, author Joanne Harris celebrates the psychological complexity of his Gothic tales.

I first became acquainted with the works of Edgar Allan Poe when I was eight or nine years old, and was immediately intrigued, partly because I’d been told the book was unsuitable and partly by the illustration on the cover, depicting a key moment from The Murders in the Rue Morgue. 

In it, a giant ape brandishes an open razor in one hand and a torn-out clump of long blonde hair in the other. Its eyes roll so horribly, its teeth are bared so enticingly that I read the story, then the whole collection, with the result that I had nightmares for weeks and my mother thereafter banned all books of horror and fantasy from the house.  That was my first introduction to Poe, and it was to lead to an enduring – if stormy – love affair.

Impalement , as a method of execution and also torture , is the penetration of a human by an object such as a stake, pole, spear, or hook, often by complete or partial perforation of the torso . It was used particularly in response to "crimes against the state" and regarded across a number of cultures as a very harsh form of capital punishment and recorded in myth and art . Impalement was also used during wartime to suppress rebellion , punish traitors or collaborators, and as a punishment for breaches of military discipline.

Offenses where impalement was occasionally employed include: contempt for the state's responsibility for safe roads and trade routes by committing highway robbery or grave robbery , violating state policies or monopolies, or subverting standards for trade. Offenders have also been impaled for a variety of cultural, sexual and religious reasons.

References to impalement in Babylonia and the Neo-Assyrian Empire are found as early as the 18th century BC. Within the Ottoman Empire , this form of execution continued into the 20th century.

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As much as we'd like to believe what Braveheart and Return of the Jedi have told us, real-world battles are rarely won by the ragtag team of underdogs. Tanks beat horses, guns beat spears.

The Swiss are truly a slippery breed. With their endless supply of clocks, pocketknives and chocolates, they have managed to outlast just about every dictator/emperor/Hitler in history. What gives? What makes them too good for our friendship?

T he Murders In The Rue Morgue by Edgar Allan Poe, considered to be the first modern detective story, was published in the USA on April 20, 1841. In this article, first published in January 2009, author Joanne Harris celebrates the psychological complexity of his Gothic tales.

I first became acquainted with the works of Edgar Allan Poe when I was eight or nine years old, and was immediately intrigued, partly because I’d been told the book was unsuitable and partly by the illustration on the cover, depicting a key moment from The Murders in the Rue Morgue. 

In it, a giant ape brandishes an open razor in one hand and a torn-out clump of long blonde hair in the other. Its eyes roll so horribly, its teeth are bared so enticingly that I read the story, then the whole collection, with the result that I had nightmares for weeks and my mother thereafter banned all books of horror and fantasy from the house.  That was my first introduction to Poe, and it was to lead to an enduring – if stormy – love affair.

Impalement , as a method of execution and also torture , is the penetration of a human by an object such as a stake, pole, spear, or hook, often by complete or partial perforation of the torso . It was used particularly in response to "crimes against the state" and regarded across a number of cultures as a very harsh form of capital punishment and recorded in myth and art . Impalement was also used during wartime to suppress rebellion , punish traitors or collaborators, and as a punishment for breaches of military discipline.

Offenses where impalement was occasionally employed include: contempt for the state's responsibility for safe roads and trade routes by committing highway robbery or grave robbery , violating state policies or monopolies, or subverting standards for trade. Offenders have also been impaled for a variety of cultural, sexual and religious reasons.

References to impalement in Babylonia and the Neo-Assyrian Empire are found as early as the 18th century BC. Within the Ottoman Empire , this form of execution continued into the 20th century.

T he Murders In The Rue Morgue by Edgar Allan Poe, considered to be the first modern detective story, was published in the USA on April 20, 1841. In this article, first published in January 2009, author Joanne Harris celebrates the psychological complexity of his Gothic tales.

I first became acquainted with the works of Edgar Allan Poe when I was eight or nine years old, and was immediately intrigued, partly because I’d been told the book was unsuitable and partly by the illustration on the cover, depicting a key moment from The Murders in the Rue Morgue. 

In it, a giant ape brandishes an open razor in one hand and a torn-out clump of long blonde hair in the other. Its eyes roll so horribly, its teeth are bared so enticingly that I read the story, then the whole collection, with the result that I had nightmares for weeks and my mother thereafter banned all books of horror and fantasy from the house.  That was my first introduction to Poe, and it was to lead to an enduring – if stormy – love affair.


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