WEFOUNDArchaeological manual


The term 'textile' is applied to woven objects and also to fabrics which are the products of other kinds of interlacing of yarns, such as braiding, looping, knitting, lace making, and netting. The textile category also includes materials such as felts and non-woven materials in which the fibers gain coherence by a process other than spinning.

1. Organic: Because textiles are organic, they are subject to attack by molds and bacteria. Decomposition is greatest in situations that favor the growth of these organisms, such as damp heat, stagnant air, and contact of the material with vegetable matter. Attack by destructive insects may also be encountered.

2. Physical: Excessive heat causes desiccation and embrittlement; exposure to ultra-violet light causes a type of deterioration known as 'tendering,' as well as the photochemical degradation of susceptible dyes.

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The term 'textile' is applied to woven objects and also to fabrics which are the products of other kinds of interlacing of yarns, such as braiding, looping, knitting, lace making, and netting. The textile category also includes materials such as felts and non-woven materials in which the fibers gain coherence by a process other than spinning.

1. Organic: Because textiles are organic, they are subject to attack by molds and bacteria. Decomposition is greatest in situations that favor the growth of these organisms, such as damp heat, stagnant air, and contact of the material with vegetable matter. Attack by destructive insects may also be encountered.

2. Physical: Excessive heat causes desiccation and embrittlement; exposure to ultra-violet light causes a type of deterioration known as 'tendering,' as well as the photochemical degradation of susceptible dyes.